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SAI Event Topic : Current Events

Afghanistan’s Next Transition: How we got here, and what comes next

START
Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 12:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

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This Harvard University panel, co-sponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies’ Negotiation Task Force, will explore the lead up to the collapse of the Afghan government, as well as what the new Taliban regime means for the future of the country and its people.

Moderator

Arvid Bell, Director, Negotiation Task Force, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies; Lecturer, Government Department, Harvard University.

Panelists

Anand Gopal, Journalist and Author

Fara Abbas, Fellow, Negotiation Task Force, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University; Former Director of Programs, National Security Council, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Philipp Ackermann, Director General, Africa, Latin America, Near and Middle East, German Ministry of Foreign Affairs

 


India at 75: The Global Roots of Independence

START
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

5:30 PM IST – 7:00 PM IST / 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM ET 

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Since independence in 1947, India has played a considerable role in shaping the world. But the world also played a considerable role in shaping Indian independence. As India approaches the 75th anniversary of its freedom, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, in association with the Harvard Club of India, presents a webinar on how the anti-colonial struggle developed beyond India’s borders, in diaspora settlements and with non-Indian partners. This webinar brings together three scholars—all with previous or current Harvard connections—to examine the overseas careers of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay, Mahendra Pratap, and J.J.Singh.

This event is part of Harvard Worldwide Week, an annual weeklong celebration of the university’s global breadth and depth.

Moderator

Dinyar PatelAssistant Professor, History, SP Jain Institute of Management and Research Affiliate, Mittal Institute, Harvard University

Speakers


Nico Slate
, Professor and Department Head, Department of History, Carnegie Mellon University

Carolien Stolte, Senior Lecturer in History at Leiden University, The Netherlands


Implications: Regional Perspectives on the US Withdrawal from Afghanistan

START
Fri, Sep 10, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Sep 10, 2021 at 10:30am

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An Asia Beyond the Headlines Seminar Series 

Panelists: 

  • Shirin Jaafari, Reporter, The World, USA  
  • Shubhanga Pandey, Chief Editor, Himal Southasian, Sri Lanka 
  • Nasim Zehra, Author/Columnist; National Security Expert; Senior Anchor/Analyst, Channel 24, Pakistan 

Moderator: 

James Robson, James C. Kralik, and Yunli Lou Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations; Harvard College Professor; Victor and William Fung Director, Asia Center, Harvard University

Biographies:

Shirin Jaafari is a reporter for The World, a public radio program based in the US. Her reporting focuses on the Middle East and Afghanistan. Most recently, she was in Afghanistan to cover the US withdrawal. Shirin has also reported from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. Before joining The World, Shirin worked for the BBC in Washington DC.

Shubhanga Pandey is the chief editor of Himal Southasian, a digital publication of South Asian politics, history, and culture. He has also written for other publications, including The World Politics Review, London Review of Books, Jacobin, and The Caravan.

Nasim Zehra is a national security specialist and a prominent journalist. As a columnist, television host, and teacher, with extensive experience in the development field, she writes and lectures widely on national security and global politics. She is the author of From Kargil to the Coup (2018). Ms. Zehra has been a Fellow and is currently an Associate at the Harvard University Asia Center. She was also a visiting lecturer at the Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad; National University of Science and Technology; and at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. Ms. Zehra has served in an honorary capacity in the following committees/positions: the President‘s Advisory Committee on Foreign Affairs and national security (2001), member of Kashmir Committee ( 2002), and Pakistan‘s Special Envoy on UNSC reforms for Canada & Latin America (June 2005). Ms. Zehra holds an MBA from Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, and a Master’s degree in Law & Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, USA.

James Robson is the James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and the William Fung Director of the Harvard University Asia Center. He has served as the Chair of the Regional Studies East Asia M.A. program. He teaches East Asian religions, in particular Daoism, Chinese Buddhism, and Zen, as well as the sophomore tutorial for concentrators. Robson received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Stanford University in 2002, after spending many years researching in China, Taiwan, and Japan. He specializes in the history of medieval Chinese Buddhism and Daoism and is particularly interested in issues of sacred geography, local religious history, and Chan/Zen Buddhism. He has been engaged in a long-term collaborative research project with the École Française d’Extrême-Orient studying local religious statuary from Hunan province. He is the author of Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak [Nanyue 南嶽] in Medieval China (Harvard, 2009), which was awarded the Stanislas Julien Prize for 2010 by the French Academy of Inscriptions and Belles-Lettres and the 2010 ToshihideNumata Book Prize in Buddhism. Robson is also the author of “Signs of Power: Talismanic Writings in Chinese Buddhism” (History of Religions 48:2), “Faith in Museums: On the Confluence of Museums and Religious Sites in Asia” (PMLA, 2010), and “A Tang Dynasty Chan Mummy [roushen] and a Modern Case of Furta Sacra? Investigating the Contested Bones of Shitou Xiqian.” His current research includes a long-term project on the history of the confluence of Buddhist monasteries and mental hospitals in East Asia.

Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center; Co-sponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


An Epidemiological Perspective on Whether There Will Be a Third Wave of COVID-19 in India?

START
Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 09:45am

6:30pm IST // 9:00am EST

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As India experiences substantive health and socioeconomic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, the webinar proposes to focus on emerging COVID-19 variants, how vaccines can adapt to these new variants, and how India can mitigate a potential third wave.

Keeping in mind the scale and severity of infection, the COVID-19 vaccines provide hope and are being accelerated at an unprecedented pace in India with a wide variety of scientists continuing to develop new vaccine technologies globally. With vaccines in our armor, the world is expecting to ‘return to pre-COVID times’ but a clear timeline is not available. Through the webinar organized by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health – India Research Center, Project SANCHAR, and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, we aim to interview Dr. William Hanage and Dr. Chandrakant Lahariya on the steps India can take to return to normal.

Speakers

William P. Hanage, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Bill Hanage is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Center for Communicable Diseases at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research and teaching focus on the epidemiology of infectious disease and evolution of infectious agents. He received his PhD from Imperial College London. He joined the faculty at HSPH in 2010. He has made seminal contributions to the study of diverse pathogens, both bacteria and viruses, and has special interest in evolution in response to interventions such as vaccination or antimicrobials, using laboratory based and computational methods.

Chandrakant Lahariya, Physician-Epidemiologist and Public Policy and Health Systems Expert
Dr. Lahariya is a medical doctor and one of India’s leading public policy, vaccines and health systems experts. He has worked with academic institutions and the World Health Organization for more than 13 years. His work focuses on vaccines and vaccination programs, health system strengthening and universal health coverage. In the field of disease outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics, his work is an eclectic mix of academic research, public policy formulation and field implementation. He is amongst the leading Indian experts in the COVID-19 pandemic preparedness and response. 

Moderator

Divya Rajagopal, Former Senior Assistant Editor, Economic Times

Sponsored by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health India Research Center; Project SANCHAR (Science and News: Communicating Health and Research); and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University, Harvard Global Research Support Centre India


The COVID-19 Crisis in India: What is the Way Forward?

START
Thu, May 13, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Thu, May 13, 2021 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

5:30-7:00 pm IST/ 8:00-9:30 am ET

Register here for the talk
Stream the talk on YouTube

Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System Public Webinar Series, in collaboration with Lancet COVID-19 Commission India Task Force

Panelists:

  • Gagandeep Kang, Professor of Microbiology, Department of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College
  • Peter Piot, Director and Handa Professor of Global Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 
  • Gautam Menon, Professor of Physics and Biology, Ashoka University
  • K. Sujatha Rao, Former Secretary of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India 
  • K Srinath Reddy, President, Public Health Foundation of India

Moderator:

Sarah Jacob, Editor/Anchor of ‘We The People’ on NDTV

Description: 

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral endeavor that aims to lay out a citizens’ roadmap to achieving universal health coverage for the people of India. Our new webinar series is intended to serve as a platform for public health discourse in India, and a means for academics, practitioners and the public to engage on substantive and timely issues regarding universal health coverage in India.

The Lancet COVID-19 Commission is an interdisciplinary initiative across the health sciences, business, finance, and public policy that was launched in July 2020. It has four themes: to propose recommendations on how best to suppress the epidemic; to address the humanitarian crises arising from the pandemic; addressing the financial and economic crises resulting from the pandemic; and rebuilding an inclusive, fair, and sustainable world. The work of the Commission is supported by twelve Task Forces, in areas ranging from vaccine development, to humanitarian relief strategies, to safe workplaces, to global economic recovery. The India Task Force of the COVID-19 Commission is the only country-specific Task Force, set up in recognition of the unique challenges that India faces in the context of COVID-19.

The first webinar in the series is a joint event with the Lancet COVID-19 Commission India Task Force and will be a panel discussion about the devastating COVID-19 pandemic surge in India – focusing on the short and long-term actions that are needed to address the impact. Leading experts from the medical, scientific, and public policy community will discuss the lessons that need to be learnt and propose what the next steps should be to respond to, and improve, the situation in India. As a Citizens’ Commission, we invite the public to participate in the discussion, provide input and engage with the panelists.


Advancing Justice: Responses to Anti-Asian Racism in the U.S.

START
Thu, Apr 1, 2021 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 1, 2021 at 05:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

PANELISTS: 

Han Lu, Senior Policy Analyst, National Employment Law Project
christina ong, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh
Elena Shih, Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

 

MODERATOR: 

Vivian Shaw, College Fellow, Department of Sociology, Harvard University; Co-Principal Investigator, AAPI COVID-19 Project

 

Han Lu’s work at the National Employment Law Project focuses on how inequalities of nationhood, carceral punishment, and the workplace shape one another. Prior to his work at NELP, Han was a line defender at the Orleans Public Defenders. He is a first-generation college graduate. Prior to law school, Han worked as a defense investigator for the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights, the juvenile public defender in his hometown of New Orleans.

christina ong is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh studying the development of Asian America in the 1960s-1980s through an in-depth case study of New York City’s the Basement Workshop. She also serves as the Project Manager and Qualitative Committee Co-Lead for the AAPI COVID-19 Project, a multidisciplinary mixed-methods study on how COVID-19 is impacting AAPI lives in the United States. Her research interests span topics related to diaspora, racial justice, and transnational feminisms.

Vivian Shaw is a College Fellow in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University and the Lead Researcher (co-PI) for the AAPI COVID-19 Project, a multi-method investigation into the impacts of the pandemic on the lives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Texas at Austin with graduate portfolios in Asian American Studies and Women’s & Gender Studies. From 2018-2019, Vivian was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Weatherhead Center for International Relations’ Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, also at Harvard.

Elena Shih is the Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University, where she directs a human trafficking research cluster through Brown’s Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice. Shih’s book project, “Manufacturing Freedom: Trafficking Rescue, Rehabilitation, and the Slave Free Good” (under contract with University of California Press), is a global ethnography of the transnational social movement to combat human trafficking in China, Thailand, and the United States. Shih is an outreach organizer with Red Canary Song, a grassroots coalition of massage workers, sex workers, and allies in New York City.

Co-sponsors: Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights​, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard-Yenching Institute, Korea Institute, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs


“Practically No Habitation”: The Yanadi Community and the Colonial Violence of Spaceflight

START
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 01:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

SPEAKER: Asif Siddiqi, Professor of History, Fordham University

The Indian state’s broken pacts with Indigenous communities, the so-called ‘scheduled tribes’ or Adivasi, resulted in massive displacements in the name of environmental, territorial, and infrastructural sovereignty, yet none have given rise to such troubling paradoxes as those implemented to build rocket launch sites. To make way for a new space center in Andhra Pradesh, in 1970, the government of India forcibly removed and resettled a large population of Yanadi people. More than fifty years later, the profound and permanent disruptions caused by this dislocation continue to reverberate in the deep social and economic precarity of the Yanadi. I recover this story as a starting point to highlight two broader intersecting frames. The first positions India’s emergent technoscientific projects in the decades after independence as reproducing certain forms of violence redolent of colonial science. The second finds echoes of such violence in infrastructural entanglements across the world in places like Algeria, Kenya, California, Kazakhstan, the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and elsewhere. I argue that the violence of displacement, dislocation, and damage, accompanied by local resistance, were not appendices to the long history of spaceflight but fundamental to it, as space activities unfolded through deeply colonial-minded practices. Moreover, I argue that such initiatives functioned squarely within the modernist aspirations of individual states, the international scientific community, and often, ordinary people, activated by the desires and promise that space exploration invoked.

Asif Siddiqi is Professor of History at Fordham University, where he works on the global history of science and technology in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Science and Technology in Asia Seminar Series is sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and convened by Victor Seow, Assistant Professor of History of Science.


The US Election’s Impact on South Asia

START
Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 02:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 03:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/99466323023
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/V_OIBk8x9uo

Ronak Desai, Research Associate at the Mittal Institute, will moderate a discussion between Nirupama Rao, Former Foreign Secretary of India, and Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT, as they explore how the potential outcomes of the US presidential election may impact the region of South Asia.

 

Moderator
  • Ronak Desai, Associate, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute
Speakers
  • Nirupama Rao, Former Foreign Secretary, India
  • Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Impact of COVID-19 on Mental Health in China, India, and the United States

START
Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 08:15pm

END
Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 09:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register to join: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_clDc-z0UQsuNO0ykYoNf5g

Moderator

  • Arthur Kleinman, Professor of Medical Anthropology, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Panelists

  • Xiao Shuiyuan, Professor, Central South University, Xianya School of Public Health
  • Yifeng Xu, President, Shanghai Mental Health Center; Head & Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine; Director, WHO/Shanghai Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Mental Health
  • Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health and Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Professor, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Co-Founder and Member of Managing Committee, Sangath
  • Karestan Koenen, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Host and Commentator

  • Winnie Yip, Professor of Global Health Policy and Economics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Director, Harvard China Health Partnership; Acting Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

This is a Fairbank Center Director’s Seminar. This event is sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Harvard China Health Partnership, and co-sponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.


The Future of Higher Education

START
Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 08:00am

END
Fri, Aug 7, 2020

What does the future of internationalization in higher education look like after the global pandemic? Trends in higher education have for a long time pointed toward ever greater internationalization of student enrollments, teaching staff, curricular content, and research networks. The general consensus is that this has been for the good: young people enjoy richer learning opportunities and institutions are stronger and more diverse. Moreover, internationalization has accelerated the advancement of scholarship in every field and discipline, leading most surveys of higher education to rely on some measure of “globalization” in determining their rankings.

Today, however, the future of international higher education suddenly seems much less certain. By forcing a halt to nearly all international travel, the pandemic has interrupted the normal movement of people within and between the world’s universities, isolating us from one another in unprecedented ways. Even before the emergence of the SARS-CoV2 virus, resurgent nationalism and xenophobia around the world were already leading some to question the value of a globalized system of higher education, and of globalization more generally. 

Dr. Mark C. Elliott, Vice Provost for International Affairs at Harvard University will discuss how the twin forces of the COVID-19 pandemic and politics has and will impact the future of international higher education.


Webinar: Science, Business, and Vaccine Development to Combat the Pandemic

START
Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 08:30am

END
Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 09:45am

Panelists

  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School & Director, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University
  • Gagandeep Kang, Executive Director, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute & Vice Chairperson of The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations
  • Umang Vohra, Managing Director & Global Chief Executive Officer, Cipla Ltd.
  • David E. Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics & Demography, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Through the lens of a contemporary case study, Harvard Business School Professor Tarun Khanna will share the geo-politics of how vaccines are developed, the funding and distribution methods that are critical to the effort, and the global alliances that facilitate this in the world today. He will speak with Dr. Gagandeep Kang, Executive Director, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute & Vice Chairperson of The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations; Umang Vohra, Managing Director & Global Chief Executive Officer, Cipla Ltd, and Dr. David E. Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics & Demography, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in a discussion on the South Asia context.

The objective is to share the mechanics and commerce of vaccine development and the critical role that science and business can play in combating pandemics such as COVID-19. The intent is to foster a collaborative and synchronous effort among science, business, and government to find synergies and solutions as they navigate the current challenges. How does one forge worldwide alliances in healthcare? How can science, business, government, and society collaborate on healthcare imperatives? How does one resolve the logistics and equity of vaccine distribution, and how can credibility and trust be built? This interactive conversation will be presented via Zoom web-conference. 


COVID-19: Reopening — Public Health and the Economy

START
Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 12:30pm

END
Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 02:00pm

Watch live on YouTube

As global economies gradually reopen, how are governments balancing economic recovery with concerns for public health? This event brings together scholars from economics, public health, and political science to discuss how different regions of the globe are approaching the complex demands of reopening.

  • Speakers
    Chi-Man (Winnie) Yip, Professor of the Practice of International Health Policy and Economics, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Joseph Allen, Assistant Professor of Exposure Assessment Science, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Judyth Twigg, Professor of Political Science, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Karl Lauterbach, Professor of Health Economics and Epidemiology, University of Cologne
  • Yasheng Huang, Epoch Foundation Professor of International Management and Faculty Director of Action Learning, MIT Sloan School of Management

Co-sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian StudiesFairbank Center for Chinese StudiesDavid Rockefeller Center for Latin American StudiesLakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the China Health Partnership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

For more information, please call 617-495-4037.