Select Page

Events

SAI Event Topic : Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Crisis and Credibility: The Politics of Ideas in India and Developing Democracies

START
Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 8, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S450

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S450
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Dr. Bilal A. Baloch is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science & Economics and a Lecturer and Regional Director in South Asia, Middle East and North Africa at The Joseph H. Lauder Institute, Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania.

At CASI, Bilal focuses on the political economy of government behavior in India and other developing democracies. Here, he is revising his doctoral dissertation, Crisis, Credibility, and Corruption: How Ideas and Institutions Shape Government Behavior in India, into a monograph. Bilal has presented academic papers at several international conferences, including the annual meetings of the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. In addition to his scholarly publications, his commentary has appeared in a number of outlets, including: The GuardianForeign Policy, The Washington Post, and The Hindu. (Source)

In this lecture, Bilal will go beyond the claim that ideas matter in Indian politics, and will identify which set of ideas, as well as how these ideas shape political behavior during a credibility crisis. He will examine two main credibility crisis moments in contemporary Indian history: that which led to the declaration of an internal emergency and suspension of civil liberties by the ruling Congress government in 1974-1975; and the crisis milieu which led to policy paralysis within the UPA government in 2011-2012. This argument draws upon over 120 interviews with state elites, including prime ministers, cabinet ministers, party leaders, senior bureaucrats, and others.


Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics Series: Is Nationalism a Democratic Resource? Evidence from India and Malaysia

START
Fri, Feb 23, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 23, 2018

VENUE
Watson Institute at Brown University

ADDRESS
Watson Institute at Brown University
111 Thayer Street
Providence, RI

As part of the Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics series, Dr. Maya Tudor will use evidence from India and Malaysia to discuss the origins of stable, democratic and effective states across the developing world.


Enfranchising Your Own? Experimental Evidence on Bureaucrat Diversity and Election Bias

START
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Yusuf Neggers, Postdoctoral Fellow, Watson Institute, Brown University

Simon Chauchard, Assistant Professor of Government Department, Dartmouth College

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Read the seminar paper.

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

 


The Lessons Private Schools Teach: Using a Field Experiment to Understand the Effects of Private Schools on Political Behavior

START
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Emmerich Davies Escobar, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard University Graduate School of Education 

Bryce Millett Steinberg, Postdoctoral Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

Read the seminar paper.


Armed Politics: Violence, Order, and the State in Southern Asia

START
Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
MIT Lucian Pye Conference Room

ADDRESS
MIT
Lucian Pye Conference Room, E40-495
1 Amherst Street
Cambridge, MA

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Paul Staniland, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

Paul Staniland is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Chicago, where he codirects the Program on International Security Policy. He is a cofounder of the Program on Political Violence. His research focuses on political violence, international security, and state formation, primarily in South and Southeast Asia. His book, Networks of Rebellion: Explaining Insurgent Cohesion and Collapse, was published by Cornell University Press in 2014. He is currently writing a book about armed politics and the state in southern Asia.

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies


Who Influences Voters in Rural India? An Experimental Approach

START
Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Simon Chauchard, Assistant Professor of Government Department, Dartmouth College

Chair: Ashutosh VarshneySol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies


New Potions in Old Bottles: Explaining the Differential Control of Smallpox in 19th Century Canton and Calcutta

START
Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K354
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Prerna SinghMahatma Gandhi Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Chair: Ashutosh VarshneySol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

Read a summary of the event here.


Neighborhood Sanitation and Infant Mortality (Livestream)

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 04:00pm

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Dean Spears, Rice Institute

Dean Spears is the Executive Director of the RICE Institute. Dean’s research focuses on children’s health and human capital, which these days often means height, sanitation, and social forces in Indian households and villages. He has also done research about population issues in social welfare and about decision-making, in particular decision-making by poor people and the social psychology of interaction between richer and poorer people. Dean has worked in El Salvador, India, and South Africa. His is originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma and has an MA in International Studies from the University of Oklahoma. He has an MPA in Development Studies and a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. He is currently a visiting economist at the Economic and Planning Unit of the Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi.

This event will be livestreamed. Click here to watch.

Cosponsored with co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown, the Weatherhead Center and the MIT Center for International Studies.

 


East India Company Revisited

START
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Atul KohIi, David K.E. Bruce Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.


Voters and Foreign Policy: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Pakistan

START
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Christopher ClaryPostdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University

In traditional surveys in Pakistan, the vast majority of respondents identify India as an enemy and a serious threat to Pakistan. Do these beliefs affect voter choices? In a novel survey experiment, we find that voters punish politicians who advocate a friendly policy toward India, but only modestly. Candidate attitudes toward India were the least meaningful characteristic for voter choice among five characteristics tested.

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.


Why Regional Parties? Clientelism, Elites, and the Indian Party System

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K354
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Adam Ziegfeld, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Today, regional parties in India win nearly as many votes as national parties. Ziegfeld questions the conventional wisdom that regional parties in India are electorally successful because they harness popular grievances and benefit from strong regional identities. Rather, in democracies where patronage, vote buying, and electoral handouts are common, regional parties are successful because they represent expedient options for office-seeking politicians.

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.