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SAI Event Topic : Water & Climate Change

Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis

START
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 08:00pm

Join us for our ongoing India Seminar Series to discuss the growing challenge of Water Fluorosis, in a discussion titled, ‘Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis’

There are about 66 million people in India suffering from toxic levels of fluoride in their drinking water, these are mostly poor people in rural communities in dry / arid area that must depend of groundwater as their drinking water source. Fluoride is a vicious toxic ion in the sense that it affects and attacks the poor far more aggressively that it affects those nutritionally better off. It also is very effective in ruining the lives of very young people who then suffer from serious bone deformation (skeletal fluorosis) and its harmful economic, social, and psychological effects.

The panelists for this discussion include,

 – Dr. Andrew Z. Haddad- ITRI-Rosenfeld Postdoctoral Fellow, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

 – Srikrishna Sridhar Murthy- Founder and CEO, Sattva Consulting

 – Dr. Sunderrajan Krishnan- Executive Director, INREM Foundation

To RSVP write to mittalinsitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu and confirm your presence at the event.


Water and Climate Change Seminar Series

START
Wed, Oct 12, 2011 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 12, 2011 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Water as a Platform for Development: A Student Panel from a Summer in Pakistan

Chair: John Briscoe, Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering Harvard University
Harvard Student Panelists: Laila Kasuri, Anjali Lohani, Erum Khalid Sattar, and Hassaan Yousuf 

View the full discussion on Vimeo.


Water and Climate Change Seminar Series

START
Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

“Prehistorical and historical changes in hydrology and settlement in the Indian Subcontinent: What happened and what can we learn?”

Liviu GiosanAssociate ScientistGeology & Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Chair: John BriscoeProfessor of the Practice of Environmental Health, HSPH; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmenta Engineering, SEAS


Water and Climate Change Seminar Series

START
Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Himalayan Glaciers, Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security

 

Henry J. Vaux, Jr., Professor of Resource Economics, Emeritus Chair, Rosenberg International Forum on Water Policy, University of California Riverside

Chair: John BriscoeProfessor of the Practice of Environmental Health, HSPH; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, SEAS

Co-sponsored with the Harvard University Center for the Environment

Read about the event here!

Himalayan Glaciers, Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security from The South Asia Initiative on Vimeo.


Water and Climate Change Seminar Series

START
Fri, Feb 22, 2013 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 22, 2013 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

The Future of Water Security in the Indus River Basin: Risks and Opportunities


Casey Brown
Assistant Professor, College of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Chair: John BriscoeProfessor of the Practice of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Co-sponsored with the Harvard University Center for the Environment

The future of Pakistan is closely tied to the future of the Indus River.  Pakistan relies on the largest contiguous irrigation system in the world, the Indus Basin Irrigation System (IBIS) for its basic food security and water supply for all sectors of the economy. The agriculture sector supported by this system plays a critical role in the national economy and livelihoods of rural communities. Water security is thus critical to the future of Pakistan.  The Indus basin, like other complex river basins, faces a common set of institutional and policy challenges, including international treaty tensions over upstream development, sectoral conflicts across water, agriculture, environment, climate, and energy agencies at the national level, low water productivity in agriculture, and inter-provincial water competition.  Amid this context the basin faces a variable and potentially changing climate. The study uses a variety of methods to assess plausible futures for the Indus and Pakistan’s hydro-economy.  This study will present a hydro-economic model of the Indus River within Pakistan that simulates river and canal flows, water use and economic activities with a distributed, partial equilibrium model of the local scale agro-economic activities in the basin. Results suggest that the current governance mechanisms have significant effects on the provinces’ ability to adapt to changing climate conditions, inflicting different economic costs under both high and low flow conditions. Alternatively, a governance mechanism that prioritizes national scale water productivity over provincial and scale water allocation largely mitigates the effect of possible climate changes. Tradeoffs between the competing national and provincial scale are explored in the context of water governance mechanisms that facilitate adaptation to a changing climate.

For the write-up of this event, please click here.


Water and Climate Change

START
Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 12:30pm

END
Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 02:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Water Diplomacy in South Asia: Managing the Science, Policy and Politics of Water Networks through Negotiation

Shafiqul Islam, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering; Professor of Water Diplomacy, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Bernard M. Gordon, Senior Faculty Fellow in Engineering; Tufts University
Chaired by John Briscoe, Professor of the Practice of Environmental Health, HSPH; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, SEAS

Water Diplomacy in South Asia: Managing the Science, Policy and Politics of Water Networks through Negotiation fromSouth Asia Initiative on Vimeo.


Water and Climate Change Seminar Series

START
Fri, Feb 25, 2011 at 12:30pm

END
Fri, Feb 25, 2011 at 02:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Indus River Basin Research: Emerging Challenges and Directions

James Wescoat, Aga Khan Professor of Architecture, MIT
Chaired by John Briscoe, Professor of the Practice of Environmental Health, HSPH; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, SEAS


Water and Climate Change

START
Fri, Feb 11, 2011 at 12:30pm

END
Fri, Feb 11, 2011 at 02:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

How Climate in South Asia is Becoming a Water Issue

Adil Najam, Director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future; Professor of International Relations and Geography & Environment, Boston University
Chaired by John Briscoe, Professor of the Practice of Environmental Health, HSPH; Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, SEAS

Climate Change has usually been viewed as a ‘carbon management’ challenge, but our failure to mitigate global climate change is ushering in the necessity of adaptation to climate change. In South Asia – as elsewhere, but possibly more than in many other places – this means that climate change will increasingly become a water management challenge. Neither the global politics of climate change nor institutions within South Asia seem to be prepared for this. This seminar will broadly discuss the challenges of climate change, development and security with a particular focus on what this means for South Asia as a region and for water as an issue.

2/11/11 How Climate Change is Becoming a Water Issue from South Asia Initiative on Vimeo.