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SAI Event Type : Student Seminar


The Past, Present and Potential Future of Coal in India

START
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

India’s coal industry is highly contested today. Between the immediacy of coal shortages, the transition to renewable energy, and air pollution problems, the long history of the coal industry and India’s deep economic and social dependence on the fuel gets lost in conversation. In this talk, Rohit will give a brief historical sketch of the Indian coal industry, and discuss some of the reasons why Coal India as both a company and a developmental actor has persisted, and is likely to persist in the near future. In particular, he will discuss the political and financial adaptations of the Indian coal industry since its nationalization in the early 1970s and some of the characteristics which differentiate it from other PSUs.

 


Non-Caste Societies, Epistemology, and Challenges in India: A Tribal Indian’s Perspective

START
Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 08:00pm

As part of the Ambedkar Lecture Series, Dr. Raile Rocky Ziipao (Raghunathan Family Fellow, The Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University; Member, Tribal Intellectual Collective India) will speak on the topic of “Non-Caste Societies, Epistemology, and Challenges in India: A Tribal Indians Perspective.”


India Conference 2018

START
Sat, Feb 10, 2018

END
Sun, Feb 11, 2018

Conference Poster with pictures of the speakers

The India Conference is one of the largest student-run conferences focusing on India in the USA. It takes place at the Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School, and is organized by graduate students at Harvard University.

In 2018, the India Conference will be celebrating its 15th anniversary. The conference will bring together business leaders, entertainment professionals, government officials, philanthropists and many others.

SAI is a co-sponsor of this event.

Conference Website

List of Speakers


Crossroads Summer Program

The Crossroads Summer Program is a fully-funded introduction to Harvard and American university culture for students from the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, and Africa, who are the first in their families to attend college and may also be facing challenging financial and social circumstances. Leading Harvard faculty will teach an intensive, multidisciplinary four-day curriculum in Dubai, for up to 60 accomplished, motivated youth.


Archive Making and Archival Silences in Mughal Punjab

START
Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
William James Hall, 1550

ADDRESS
William James Hall, 1550
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge MA

Cosponsored Event

Speaker:

Purnima Dhavan,  Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies, Howard and Frances Keller Endowed Professor in History at University of Washington

Moderators:
Sunil Sharma, Professor of Persian & Indian Literatures at Boston University
Neelam Khoja, Ph.D. Candidate Histories and Cultures of Muslim Societies at Harvard University

Lahore, the major urban hub and occasional seasonal capital of the Mughal Empire, has a well-documented history of Persian literary production. The historical roots of a local literary vernacular, and in particular Punjabi, is far less documented and somewhat opaque. Written in several scripts and never fully formalized into a regular orthography and grammar during this early period, Punjabi had a robust presence in every day settings, yet has left a slender archival presence. In this paper, I will contrast a well-known cluster of Persian scholars from seventeen-century Punjab with less familiar regional networks to demonstrate how Persian learning and literacy had intimate but complicated connections with Punjabi literary culture. Both archival presence and silence hint at more fruitful ways of thinking about the literary practices of Punjabi scholarly communities as well as the circulation of their efforts in overlapping circles.

Organized by the South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop 
Co-Sponsored by the Harvard South Asia Institute 


Old Stories in New Moments: Digambara Jain Rāmāyaṇa Literature in Early Modernity

START
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Gregory Clines, Ph.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Catherine HartmannPh.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion

The fifteenth-century author Brahma Jinadāsa, a member of the Digambara Balatkāra Gaṇa, is credited with composing over eighty works in both Sanskrit and Old Gujarati. One of those compositions was the Padmapurāṇa, a Jain version of the story of Rāma composed in Sanskrit. In the introduction to the work, Jinadāsa acknowledges that his Padmapurāṇa is based off of the acclaimed poet Raviṣeṇa’s seventh-century work of the same name. This talk examines the relationship between the two works, analyzing the literary changes that Jinadāsa makes to his precursor’s text and the social implications of those changes.

 


Strength in Numbers: How Women’s Networks Close India’s Political Gender Gap

START
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Soledad PrillamanPh.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Zeynep Pamuk, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University

In India there persists a striking gender gap in political participation and representation, despite several decades of targeted policy interventions. Women’s political participation is important not only on normative grounds of inclusion, but because we know that when women do participate, politics changes. Prillaman presents a theoretical model of political behavior in rural India which argues that women’s lack of political participation is the result of coordinated political behavior in the household. Prillaman then argues and shows that women’s access to networks of other women is one channel through which we can see a shift towards a gender-inclusive equilibrium, even when resource allocations, social norms, and household dynamics would suggest otherwise.


Citizenship Denied: A Microhistory of Indian Immigration in the Early Twentieth Century

START
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Hardeep Dhillon, PhD Candidate, Dept. of History, Harvard University; SAI Graduate Student Associate

Discussants:

Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

In the early twentieth century, immigration from Asia to the U.S. propelled local, national, and global questions on race, labor, imperialism, and citizenship. This talk will present a microhistory of these events.


Summer Grant Opportunities Open House

START
Thu, Jan 26, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Jan 26, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Come hear about SAI Summer Funding opportunities, including research and internship grants, and ask any last minute questions about the application process.

Deadline to apply: February 15, 2017


Getting Better: Stories from KEM Hospital and GS Medical College, India

START
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 07:00pm

VENUE
14 Story Street, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
Cambridge, MA

Student Event

Join us for a film screening, dinner, & discussion with Gulserene Dastur, the filmmaker, & Dr. David Jones, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine

“The Hospital that never turns anyone away”: A 2200 bed, state-run hospital which treats 1.7 million people a year – overcrowded, used and abused, KEM Hospital is the last resort for the destitute. On an average day, the hospital admits 230 in-patients, treats 560 emergency patients, operates on 150 patients, and sees 5800 out-patients. “Getting Better” was born out of 2 years of extensive research and 4 years of shooting, and is a snapshot into a system where “nothing is easy, but nothing is impossible.”

Cosponsored with the Harvard Global Health Institute


Afghan Refugees Left Behind – Crisis in Europe

START
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 05:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 06:30pm

VENUE
Gutman Conference, Center Area 2

ADDRESS
Gutman Conference, Center Area 2
Harvard Graduate School of Education
Cambridge, MA 02138

Student Event

Alexandra Chen, PhD student, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Zhoal Atif, Graduate of Harvard Graduate School of Education

Alexandra Chen is a child protection and mental health specialist working with refugees in conflict and post-conflidt zones. Alexandra has worked over the las several years in the Middle East and Africa, most recently as a mental health and psychosocial advisor to the UN on the Syria crisis. Zohal Atif is a graduate of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her focus is on education for refugees in conflict and post-conflict zones. In the summer of 2016 she worked with Afghan and Syrian refugees in Greece.

Light refreshments will be served.

Hosted by Harvard Students for Afghanistan


Gandhi’s Forgotten Campaign: The Abolition of Indenture and the Mahatma

START
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Student Event

Presented by the South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop

Mrinalini SinhaAlice Freeman Palmer Professor of History; Professor (by courtesy) of English and Women’s Studies; Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows (2015-), University of Michigan

Respondents:

Sunil AmrithMehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of History

Mou BanerjeePhD Candidate, Dept. of History, Harvard University

Cosponsored by the South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop and the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute

The indentured labor system, which had been put in place in the aftermath of Atlantic slavery to replace emancipated African slaves with indentured Indians on colonial plantations overseas, came under widespread attack by the early decades of the 20th century. M.K. Gandhi’s involvement in the movement for the abolition of indenture, or what following the abolition of Atlantic slavery has been called the “second abolition,” helped launch his political career in India. Yet the campaign against indenture occupies an obscure and undigested role in the scholarship on Gandhi and on modern India. What might it mean to restore abolitionism to its role in the advent of Gandhi’s career in India? What might abolitionism tell us about Gandhi’s signature concepts of swaraj and satyagraha? This talk will shed light on the abolition movement in India and explore its implications for understanding Gandhi’s politics.


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