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Mobile Technology Summer Program Final Presentation

START
Mon, Sep 21, 2015 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Sep 21, 2015 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

SAI Special Event

This summer, with support from Harvard’s President’s Innovation Fund for International Experiences, SAI ran an 8-week summer program in India for Harvard College students to explore the potential of mobile technology to enable economic and social mobility, which combined academic coursework and experiential learning. The program culminated in a final project, which the students will present on campus at this interactive event, with feedback from the faculty leaders.

Students:

Diane JungHuman Development and Regenerative Biology, Harvard College ‘17

Kais Khimji, Social Studies, Harvard College,  ‘17

Pradeep Niroula, Government, Harvard College ‘18

Eshaan PatheriaApplied Math & Computer Science, Harvard College ‘18

Faculty:

Satchit Balsari, FXB Research Fellow, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights; Director, Weill Cornell Medical College Global Emergency Medicine Program

Malavika JayaramFellow,  Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University; Fellow, Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore

Tarun Khanna, Director of the South Asia Institute;  Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor,  Harvard Business School

JP Onnela,  Assistant Professor at the Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health

Read more about the program.

The Idea of the Universal Human: Kuvempu on Self, Society, and Politics

START
Fri, May 1, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, May 1, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

SAI South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Chandan Gowda, Professor of Sociology, Azim Premji University

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

Kuvempu (1904-1994), the famous Kannada literary figure, observed, “The Veda is an unfinished book.”  Influenced by the vedantic thought of Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, Swami Vivekananda, and Sri Aurobindo, Kuvempu did not consider the Vedas and the Upanishads as texts of Brahminical orthodoxy; instead, for him, they constituted India’s common spiritual heritage that both provided moral guidance and allowed for their own renewal in relation to contemporary politics.  Kuvempu’s critiques of caste and religious orthodoxy were inseparable from his concerns with reconstructing the “Bharatiya” philosophical heritage.  This paper reconstructs Kuvempu’s ethics of self-making and their epistemic and social significance through an examination of his ideal of Vishvamanava (“Universal Human”) and its embodiment in a few of his writings and in Mantra Mangalya, a new form of marriage that he introduced in 1966.

The Future of Capitalism in India

START
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Prasannan Parthasarathi, Professor of History, Boston College

Amit Basole, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts-Boston

Discussant: Sanjay G ReddyAssociate Professor of Economics and Co-Academic Director of the India-China Institute, The New School for Social Research

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

What are the historical roots of the economic and ecological crises associated with neoliberal capitalism in contemporary India?  How might we imagine alternative visions of development, which might work to ameliorate problems of jobless growth, agricultural decline, and ecological destruction?  This panel discussion will address these questions through explorations of economic and ecological transformations in nineteenth-century India (Prasannan Parthasarathi) and contemporary approaches to sustainable development drawing on immanent knowledge and collectivities (Amit Basole).  The presentations will offer reflections on the possible futures of capitalism, development, and ecology in India.

Co-sponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies and the Harvard US-India Initiative (HUII)

 

Language of Metaphysics, Language for Politics: Some Lessons from Allama Prabhu’s Vacanas

START
Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi, Assistant Professor of History, Karnataka State Open University.

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

The seminar will focus on the vacanas of Allama Prabhu, the 12th century vacanākara (maker of vacanas) and mystic. More specifically, the seminar will discuss Allama’s attitude towards language, especially its ability to describe the transcendental, and his distinctive mode of composing vacanas. Allama doesn’t believe that anubhāva, the mystical divine experience, can be articulated through poetry, and thus sets up for his poetry an impossibility as its task: articulation of the inarticulable. Allama develops a distinctive style by deploying Tantric vocabulary, and by using allusive propositions.

Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi’s reading of Allama’s vacanas will center around two themes. First, what we may learn from Allama’s attitude towards language especially in presenting the transcendental through poetry? Sobhi consider this to be a particularly salient question in the context of political Hindutva, and Allama’s reluctance to use language to speak about Siva might offer us new ways of discussing religion in the political sphere. Sobhi’s second theme focuses on his use of allusive propositions as a formal method to think about the world. Unlike Nāgārjuna or Digñāga, Allama is not a formal, systematic thinker. His engagement of other Indian intellectuals and their ideas is through the vacana mode. Are there any philosophical and hermeneutical lessons in Allama’s poetry?

Art, Communities, and Museums

START
Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 05:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

S. Mukherjee, Director General & Secretary, Board of Trustees, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya

Chair: Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Mr. Mukherjee’s presentation will include an overview of issues concerning museums in South Asia, and he will also discuss his experience transforming his museum, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, into a civic node for all types of civic events and discussions.

Mr. Sabyasachi Mukherjee is Director General of the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (formerly Prince of Wales Museum of Western India) and Director of the Postgraduate (Diploma) Program in Museology and Art Conservation at the CSMVS Institute, University of Mumbai.  Under his leadership from 2007, CSMVS has undergone extensive modernization, including refurbishment of the museum’s main building and the establishment of a conservation center, new galleries and digital and educational initiatives.  Mr. Mukherjee has organized numerous art exhibitions and has overseen publications, conservation projects, exchange programs and archive projects in partnership with museums worldwide.  A frequent lecturer and active member of many professional committees, Mr. Mukherjee has been a fellow of the Nehru Trust and the Salzburg Global Seminar.  He holds an MA in Museology and an MA in Ancient Indian History, Culture and Archaeology from Maharaja Sayajirao University.

Art and the Science of Facial Surgery

START
Fri, Mar 14, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 14, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138


VENUE
CGIS South, S450

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S450
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Global Health Seminar

Dr. Paul C. SalinsMedical Director & Vice President, Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center and Narayana Hrudayalaya Multi Specialty Hospital

Chair: Jinah KimAssistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

For more than 30 years, Dr. Salins has modified, rebuilt and deconstructed faces, some to create harmony, others to restore normalcy, and few to meet an individuals expectation. Yet, great art uncovers faces which fascinates, captivates and powerfully communicates, whether ugly or beautiful, harmonious or full of discord. The real face that in art becomes manifested seems to elude the surgeon, condemning his efforts to boring repetitions of aesthetic ideas. Can this gulf be bridged, and as mankind as we know changes, will art define the new faces we shall seek?

The Beautification of Postwar Colombo

START
Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Urbanization Seminar

Jonathan Spencer, Professor of the Anthropology of South Asia & Head of School of Social and Political Science, Social Anthropology, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh

Chair: Charles Hallisey, Yehan Numata Senior Lecturer on Buddhist Literatures, Harvard Divinity School

Since the end of the country’s 30-year civil war in 2009, the Sri Lankan armed forces have continued to grow despite the absence of obvious military threats to the government. Under the guidance of the President’s brother, the Ministry of Defence now plays a leading role in town planning through the Urban Development Authority (which is formally part of the Ministry). Colombo has seen an aggressive programme of improvement, which started with a “war” on alleged underworld figures, has taken in the eviction of hawkers from pedestrian spaces, the creation of new leisure areas, and now would seem to involve the clearance of “sub-standard” housing, especially in places like Slave Island, an historically dense and religiously and culturally mixed area near the city centre. This talk will explore the different kinds of politics that may be at work in this moment, and ask what the project of “beautifying” Colombo might tell us about the political dynamics of postwar Sri Lanka.

Cosponsored with the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation

India’s Foreign Policy and Regional Multilateralism

START
Thu, Sep 19, 2013 at 12:30pm

END
Thu, Sep 19, 2013 at 02:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Harvard South Asia Institute Book Talk

Arndt Michael, University of Freiburg
Chair: Tarun Khanna, Director, South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Winner of the Association of Third World Studies’ Cecil B. Currey Book Award and the German-Indo Society’s Gisela Bonn Award 2013

“Arndt Michael, India’s Foreign Policy and Regional Multilateralism (UK: Palgrave, MacMillan, 2013). It is an important topic especially with regard to the developing world.  It is logically written and allows even non-specialists to grasp the basic topic.  It is based on thorough knowledge of the existing literature and incorporates significant new original materials that make this a must read. Indeed, it provides a tight and clear analysis that provides important concepts that build a foundation for the future study of the general topic. Worth reading, especially if you are interested in modern Indian foreign policy.  To be sure, it is a topic Americans should be interested in, most especially our leaders!” Dr. William Head, Chair of the Selection Committee, Cecil B. Currey Book Award