Venue Information


CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Events at this Venue

Movie Screening by IndiaGSD: India Untouched

START
Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 4, 2018

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Even after 70 years of India’s emancipation it has remained plagued by the caste system and untouchability is its worst form of manifestation. Critically acclaimed director Stalin K looks at the insidious ways in which the social marginalization of a quarter of India’s population is sustained with the collusion of state agencies.      

 

[read more on IMDb http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1552060/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

Rethinking Dalit Feminism

START
Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 06:15pm

END
Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 08:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Speaker: Cynthia Stephen, Independent Researcher on gender, poverty, development and policy issues. 

Light refreshments will be served. 

Arts at SAI Seminar: Tea Tales of Bangladesh

START
Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Faiham Ebna Sharif, SAI Visiting Artist

Chair: Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Comments by: Alison Nordström, Curator and Historian of Photography

SAI Visiting Artist Faiham Ebra Sharif is a is a freelance multimedia journalist and photographer. He will discuss his current project, Cha Chakra: Tea Tales of Bangladesh, which sheds light on the plight of the tea garden workers of Bangladesh who are among the lowest paid and most vulnerable laborers in the world yet are strangely invisible to the global media. This project aims to collect the undocumented history of the global tea industry through photography, oral histories, and archival materials

Dreams of Independence: Vernacular Nationalism Among the Mizos of Northeast India

START
Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 12:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Roluahpuia, the Mittal Institute’s Raghunathan Family Fellow, will discuss his research into the relationship between orality and nationalism at two levels through the lens of the Mizo case in northeast India. The first level surrounds the process of creating a vernacular language, involving the reframing and reconstruction of nationalist ideas. The second is the irrepressibility of the oral vernacular against the state’s violent response to the nationalist movement. As a result, the “vernacularization” of nationalist ideas reveals peoples’ agency to construct their own sense and understanding of the nation.

This discussion will be chaired by Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs in the Department of History at Harvard University.

Lunch and refreshments will be served.

Book Talk: The Future Is Asian

START
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Parag Khanna, Managing Partner of FutureMap, will discuss his new book entitled “The Future Is Asian,” in a talk chaired by Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at Harvard Business School and Director of The Mittal Institute. 
 
This event is co-sponsored with the Harvard University Asia Center.
 
About the book:
 
“The ‘Asian Century‘ is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia—linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. From investment portfolios and trade wars to Hollywood movies and holiday travels, no aspect of life is immune from Asianization.
 
“Dr. Parag Khanna’s latest book, “The Future Is Asian,” presents this irrepressible global Asianization through detailed analysis, data and maps of Asia’s major markets and their combined impact on global economy, society and governance. With his trademark conceptual clarity and on-the-ground reportage, Khanna provides essential guidance for executives as they look to hedge their China exposure and capture the next big commercial opportunities across Asia from real estate and retail to finance and technology, and attract Asian capital and talent into their operations at home and abroad. With his intimate knowledge of Asian history and geopolitics, he also paints a compelling vision of a balanced global system of shared responsibilities across America, Europe and Asia.” (Parag Khanna, 2019)
 

The First Battlefield of Western Nuclear Competition: India and Light Water Reactors, 1955–1963

START
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

This event is co-hosted by the Asia Center and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.

As part of the Asia Center’s Science and Technology Seminar Series, Professor Jayita Sarkar of the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University will discuss nuclear policy in India.

After President Eisenhower’s 1953 “Atoms for Peace” proposal at the United Nations General Assembly, U.S. technological superiority in nuclear technologies became a powerful tool of U.S. foreign policy in the form of civil nuclear assistance. American light water reactor sales were offered to Western Europe, Asia and elsewhere under Section 123 of the 1954 U.S. Atomic Energy Act, thereby, making General Electric, Westinghouse, Babcock & Wilcox and Combustion Engineering the major reactor suppliers in the world. Both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations were anxious about the impact of an imminent Chinese nuclear weapons test on non-Communist and non-aligned India.

Policymakers in Washington, therefore, decided that the best chance of stalling Indian nuclear proliferation was to offer American power reactors that could help demonstrate the peaceful nuclear capability of the democratic Asian country, in sharp contrast to the military capability of the authoritarian Chinese communist state. Moreover, U.S. reactors would allow U.S. access and oversight on India’s nuclear program through safeguards. This led to the first bilateral reactor agreement between the United States and India leading to U.S. supply of two light water reactors built in Tarapur.

Notwithstanding the Indian Atomic Energy Commission’s opposition to safeguards, its chairman Homi J. Bhabha accepted the US offer because of the generous financial package that it accompanied, thereby, beating the offer of reactors without safeguards from the French Commissariat a l’emergie atomique. After India’s 1974 nuclear explosion, the US supplied light water reactors became tools of U.S. nonproliferation policy toward the Indian Atomic Energy Commission.

Victor Seow, Assistant Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, will chair this lecture. 

2019 Summer Grants Open House

START
Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

The Mittal Institute’s summer student grant applications for 2019 are now open. If you’re a Harvard undergraduate or graduate student looking to fund your researchinternship, or language study in South Asia this summer, the deadline to apply for a grant is February 8. Come hear about The Mittal Institute’s funding opportunities for Summer 2019.

At our Open House, you can get all of your questions answered about the grants and the application process. Join us to learn more and enjoy some delicious South Asian food. RSVP to our event on Facebook!

Please note: This opportunity is only available to current Harvard students.

The Great Indian Migration Wave

START
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST   Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Join visiting scholar Chinmay Tumbe and moderator Ian Talbot for a discussion about the great Indian Migration wave.  In this seminar, Tumbe provides an overview of his book, India Moving: A History of Migration, that attempts to explain when, how and why people have moved to, from and within the subcontinent over centuries. It reveals one of the world’s largest, longest and on-going episodes of labour migration, referred to as the Great Indian Migration Wave, and its significance in modern Indian history. It provides a new perspective on the migration of business communities both within and outside India. It shows how 25 million people who trace their roots to India in the past three centuries, were dispersed across the world from Japan to Jamaica and why internal diasporas matter as much as international diasporas. It documents the mass migrations caused by multiple Partitions, refugee crises and other displacements in Indian history and their disproportionate impact on particular communities. And finally, it provides a perspective on migration and development, in history and in 21st century India.

Chinmay Tumbe is faculty member of the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad and the 2018 Alfred D. Chandler Jr International Visiting Scholar in Business History at Harvard Business School. He works on migration, cities, firms and history. He chairs the IIMA Archives initiative and coordinates the History Internship series at IIMA. An alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science and the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, he has been a faculty member at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyderabad and was the 2013 Jean Monnet Fellow at the Migration Policy Centre, European University Institute, Florence, Italy. He has published widely on migration for a decade and has served on policymaking groups.

Rohingya Persecution in Myanmar: Evidence and Accountability

START
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) surveyed leaders from 604 Rohingya hamlets in Myanmar’s Rakhine state encompassing more than 916,000 people. The findings, coupled with in-depth interviews and forensic medical examinations of Rohingya survivors, point to a widespread and systematic pattern of targeted violence – including rapes and killings of women, men, and children – that drove more than 720,000 Rohingya into neighboring Bangladesh. Dr. Parveen Parmar and Dr. Jen Leigh will present the findings of these studies.