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Events at this Venue

Fellows Seminar: The Question of Tribes in Northeast India

START
Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Ziipao posits that road building has always been an act of power, which has at different times been leveraged to smooth relationships, secure borders, (dis)connect people, enable trade, create spaces of contestation, or dilute boundaries between varied ethnic groups.

Colossus: Delhi in Theory

START
Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

India’s National Capital Region now includes parts of four states and about 30 million people. It is in the vanguard of global urban change of a particular type—the rise of the colossal metropolis. What do we know and can say about its spatial structure (and change) and social structure (and change)? How well does existing “urban theory” prepare us for Delhi? To what extent does Delhi prepare us for a new “urban theory”? How much of it is global, how much Indian, and how much just Delhi itself?

South Asia Without Borders Seminar: Divine Kingdoms of the Western Himalaya: From Subjects to Citizens

START
Tue, Mar 20, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 20, 2018 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Professor Sax will discuss the pre-colonial society of the Western Himalayas, which consisted of small territories ruled by local devatas (Hindu deities) through their oracles. He will provide ethnographic details of the system as it still exists, paying special attention to how it has adapted to the modern, secular Indian republic.

Cleaning Up India? Obstacles and Assets

START
Mon, Mar 19, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Mar 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Assa Doron, Australian National University
Robin Jeffrey, Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore
Chair: Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Waste of a Nation: Garbage and Growth in India (Harvard UP, 2018) examines national assets and obstacles for achieving a cleaner India. The authors argue that obstacles that appear unique to India are volume, density, and the caste system. The authors will also discuss India’s assets, including old practices of frugality; recycling; global experience and science; and dynamic entrepreneurs, officials, NGOs, and citizens.

 

 

 

Book Talk: India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971

START
Fri, Sep 22, 2017 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Sep 22, 2017

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

A book talk on India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971
Dr. Arjun Subramaniam, Asia Center Fellow; former Faculty Member, National Defence College, New Delhi; retired Air Vice Marshal, Indian Air Force

Chair/Discussant: Professor Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

An Asia Center Fellows Seminar; co-sponsored by the South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Old Stories in New Moments: Digambara Jain Rāmāyaṇa Literature in Early Modernity

START
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Gregory Clines, Ph.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Catherine HartmannPh.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion

The fifteenth-century author Brahma Jinadāsa, a member of the Digambara Balatkāra Gaṇa, is credited with composing over eighty works in both Sanskrit and Old Gujarati. One of those compositions was the Padmapurāṇa, a Jain version of the story of Rāma composed in Sanskrit. In the introduction to the work, Jinadāsa acknowledges that his Padmapurāṇa is based off of the acclaimed poet Raviṣeṇa’s seventh-century work of the same name. This talk examines the relationship between the two works, analyzing the literary changes that Jinadāsa makes to his precursor’s text and the social implications of those changes.