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SAI Event Region : India


The Right to Health and Universal Health Coverage

START
Mon, Oct 18, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Mon, Oct 18, 2021 at 09:30am

5:30 pm to 7:00 pm IST / 8:00 am to 9:30 am ET

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Stream the talk on YouTube 

The webinar is a joint Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System event with the Centre for Health Equity, Law and Policy on the interlinkages between right to health and universal health coverage. The panel will discuss the right to health as a foundational framework for design and implementation of universal health coverage, with particular emphasis on marginalized contexts, and social determinants of health. As a Citizens’ Commission, we invite the public to participate in the discussion, provide input and engage with the panelists.

Panelists:

Dr. Dainius Puras, Former UN Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health (2014-2020)

Dr. Gita Sen, Director & Distinguished Professor, Ramalingaswami Centre on Equity & Social Determinants of Health (RCESDH), Public Health Foundation of India, Bangalore  

Meera Sanghamitra, National Alliance of People’s Movements and Telangana Hijra Intersex Transgender Samiti 

Vivek Divan, Coordinator, Centre for Health Equity Law and Policy, Indian Law Society, Pune 

Moderator:

Shivangi Rai, Deputy Coordinator, Centre for Health Equity Law and Policy, Indian Law Society, Pune    

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral endeavor that aims to lay out a citizens’ roadmap to achieving universal health coverage for the people of India. Our new webinar series is intended to serve as a platform for public health discourse in India, and a means for academics, practitioners and the public to engage on substantive and timely issues regarding universal health coverage in India.

The Centre for Health Equity Law and Policy, established by the Indian Law Society, uses the law as a tool for health transformation, embedding its work in the right to health as envisaged within India’s constitutional framework and her international commitments. It advocates for equity and justice in health through generation, sharing and use of knowledge that informs related law and policy.


Mittal Institute Student Grants Open House

START
Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 05:30pm

END
Mon, Oct 4, 2021

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

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Come learn about funding opportunities available to Harvard students interested in South Asia! The Mittal Institute supports undergraduate and graduate students in a wide variety of disciplines with grants for internships, language study, and research. Winter Term applications are due on October 22. Join us on October 4 either in-person at CGIS S250 or register to attend virtually at bit.ly/2ZBHSoB. 


India at 75: The Global Roots of Independence

START
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

5:30 PM IST – 7:00 PM IST / 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM ET 

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Since independence in 1947, India has played a considerable role in shaping the world. But the world also played a considerable role in shaping Indian independence. As India approaches the 75th anniversary of its freedom, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, in association with the Harvard Club of India, presents a webinar on how the anti-colonial struggle developed beyond India’s borders, in diaspora settlements and with non-Indian partners. This webinar brings together three scholars—all with previous or current Harvard connections—to examine the overseas careers of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay, Mahendra Pratap, and J.J.Singh.

This event is part of Harvard Worldwide Week, an annual weeklong celebration of the university’s global breadth and depth.

Moderator

Dinyar PatelAssistant Professor, History, SP Jain Institute of Management and Research Affiliate, Mittal Institute, Harvard University

Speakers


Nico Slate
, Professor and Department Head, Department of History, Carnegie Mellon University

Carolien Stolte, Senior Lecturer in History at Leiden University, The Netherlands


Indian Political Thought in the Global Age

START
Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 01:00pm

VENUE
Webinar


9:30-10:30 pm IST / 12:00-1:00 pm ET

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The Association for Global Political Thought (AGPT) presents “Indian Political Thought in the Global Age.” The event is part of the Association for Global Political Thought’s (AGPT) Seminar Series. Professor Shruti Kapila (Faculty of History & Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University) will discuss the intellectual origins and global contexts of her new book, Violent Fraternity: Indian Political Thought in the Global Age, as well as her thoughts on the state and future of Indian political thought. Kelvin Ng (History Department, Yale University) will comment and respond, with an emphasis on Islam, Civil War and modern republican sovereignty in South Asia. 

Speakers

  • Professor Shruti Kapila is an intellectual historian and political thinker, currently University Lecturer in History and Convenor, History and Politics Tripos in the Faculty of History, and Fellow at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University.  
  • Kelvin Ng (History Department, Yale University) Kelvin Ng is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at Yale University. His research interests broadly lie in the history of imperialism and anti-imperialism in the early-twentieth-century Indian Ocean circuit.  

Moderators

  • Hansong Li is a political theorist and historian of political, economic, and legal thought at the Department of Government, the Joint Centre for History and Economics, the Minda de Gunzburg Centre for European Studies, and the Mittal Institute for South Asia at Harvard University. 
  • Yi Ning Chang is a PhD student in political theory at the Department of Government at Harvard University. Her research focuses on postcolonial theory and the history of political thinking on race, capitalism, and the modern state in modern Southeast Asia. 

This event is sponsored by Harvard University’s Asia Center.


ScienSpur: Information Session on Courses in Life Sciences

START
Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

5:30pm-7:00pm IST // 8:00am-9:30am EST

Register here

ScienSpur and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University are hosting a virtual information session on the upcoming fall semester courses in Life Sciences on September 24, 2021, from 5.30 pm to 7 pm (IST). Kindly register and confirm your presence.

Scienspur, co-founded by, Nagaraju Dhanyasi (Harvard Post-doctoral fellow) and Vinay Vikas (Sr. Associate Scientist at a biopharma industry) provides courses in STEM education to economically disadvantaged students attending public colleges and universities in India. It aims to nourish the scientific curiosity in students and to equip them to become globally competitive to pursue their dreams in higher education.

The courses shall be taught to undergraduate and masters students free of cost by post-doctoral and independent researchers from world class institutions. Applications for the fall semester courses in Life Sciences are being accepted till September 30, 2021. 


Art Walk: Liminal Worlds by Sunanda Khajuria

START
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 05:00pm

END
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 07:00pm

5:00-7:00PM IST

RSVP here by 4pm Friday, Sept 10

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute in association with the Harvard Club of India is hosting an immersive art walk at the exhibition themed, Liminal Worlds, featuring the artwork of a former Visiting Artist Fellow at Harvard University, Sunanda Khajuria. Explore the transient, dream-like worlds of Sunanda Khajuria and hear her speak about her work and journey as an artist on Saturday, September 11, 2021, from 5 pm to 7 pm. Since the exhibition is a limited capacity event, kindly RSVP and confirm your presence by 4 pm on Friday, September 10, 2021.

Venue

Art Heritage, 205, Tansen Marg, Triveni Kala Sangam, Mandi House, New Delhi, Delhi 110001

About the Artist

Sunanda Khajuria is a visual artist who is deeply inspired by Chinese traditional painting techniques and draws her imagery from both the terrain of ethereal memory as well as from actual, physical landscapes she has visited. Through her psychedelic and startling dreamscapes, she attempts to create liminal spaces, capturing the experience of being ‘in transit.’ Using a lexicon of symbols, and visual metaphors, she skillfully interweaves images of transition and mobility and places them in a non-perspectival liminal space.


Entangled Histories: The Bamiyan Buddhas—Past, Present, and Future

START
Wed, Sep 22, 2021 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Sep 22, 2021 at 08:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

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Western scholarship has focused on the monumental sculptures in Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Valley as Buddhas created in the late sixth and early seventh centuries. This lecture tells an alternative story based on Islamic sources from the tenth to the twentieth century, which saw these sculptures not as Buddhas but as legendary heroes representing the mythic conversion of the Bamiyan Valley to Islam. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the Taliban destroyed the sculptures—as Buddhas. After the fall of the Taliban, the sculptures’ entangled histories and the viewpoints of multiple stakeholders posed challenges for the global debate on how best to memorialize the destroyed images. Now that the Taliban has again taken power, the question is: what is Bamiyan’s future?

Speakers:

Deborah Klimburg-Salter, University Professor of Art History, emerita, University of Vienna, Austria, and Associate, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Masanori Nagaoka, Programme Specialist for Culture, UNESCO Office in Cambodia

This talk will take place online via Zoom. Free admission, but registration is required. To register, please complete this online form. Please read these instructions on how to join a meeting on Zoom. For general questions, email am_register@harvard.edu.

The Harvard Art Museums are committed to accessibility for all visitors. For anyone requiring accessibility accommodations for our programs, please contact us at am_register@harvard.edu at least 48 hours in advance.


Political Misinformation in India: Evidence from Experimental Solutions

START
Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 24, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

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Dr. Sumitra Badrinathan is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Oxford. In May 2021, she received a PhD in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include studying misinformation, media effects and political behavior, with a regional focus on India.

Sumitra’s dissertation evaluates the effectiveness of interventions to combat political misinformation in India and the power of partisanship and motivated reasoning to affect information processing. To shed light on these questions, her research has focused on techniques to fight fake news on WhatsApp and digital literacy trainings to decrease vulnerability to misinformation. Her work has appeared in academic journals such as the American Political Science Review well as popular press such as The Washington Post. Methodologically, Sumitra uses experimental and survey methods to study the relationship between newer forms of media like WhatsApp and their effect on trust in news, polarization, political participation, and quality of democracy.

Originally from Mumbai, India, Sumitra holds an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in Psychology from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

A Joint Sem­i­nar on South Asian Pol­i­tics co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown, the Weatherhead Center and South Asia Institute at Harvard and the MIT Center for International Studies


The Past and Future of India-China Relations

START
Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 10:00am

END
Fri, Oct 29, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

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Join Kanti Prasad Bajpai, Vijay Gokhal, and Shivshankar Menon, Tanvi Madan and Taylor Fravel to discuss relations between China and India.

Chair: Vipin Narang, MIT

Vijay Gokhale is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie India.  Mr. Gokhale retired from the Indian Foreign Service in January 2020 after a diplomatic career that spanned thirty-nine years. From January 2018 to January 2020, he served as the foreign secretary of India. 

Prior to his term as foreign secretary, Mr. Gokhale had served as India’s high commissioner to Malaysia from January 2010 to October 2013, as ambassador of India to the Federal Republic of Germany from October 2013 to January 2016, and as ambassador of India to the People’s Republic of China from January 2016 to October 2017. He has served as head of the India-Taipei Association, in Taiwan, from July 2003 to January 2007. During his time in the headquarters of the Ministry of External Affairs, he has also worked in key positions in the East Asia Division, including as the joint secretary (Director General) for East Asia from March 2007 to December 2009. 

In his new book, ‘The Long Game: How the Chinese Negotiate with India’, Gokhale unpacks the dynamics of India-China relations through the prism of six historical and recent events. The book gives a practitioner’s insight into strategies, tactics, and tools that China uses for diplomatic negotiations.

Shivshankar Menon is a Distinguished Fellow at CSEP and a Visiting Professor at Ashoka University. His long career in public service spans diplomacy, national security, atomic energy, disarmament policy, and India’s relations with its neighbours and major global powers. Menon served as national security advisor to the Indian Prime Minister from January 2010 to May 2014. He currently serves as chairman of the advisory board of the Institute of Chinese Studies in New Delhi. He was also a Distinguished Fellow with Brookings India. He is the author of “Choices: Inside the Making of Indian Foreign Policy” published by the Brookings Press and Penguin Random House in 2016. His new book, “India and Asian Geopolitics; The Past, Present” is likely to be out in 2021.

Menon has previously served as foreign secretary of India from October 2006 to August 2009 and as ambassador and high commissioner of India to Israel (1995-1997), Sri Lanka (1997-2000), China (2000-2003) and Pakistan (2003-2006). From 2008 to 2014, he was also a member of India’s Atomic Energy Commission. A career diplomat, he also served in India’s missions to the International Atomic Energy Agency in Geneva and the United Nations in New York.

In his new book, India and Asian Geopolitics: The Past, PresentMenon traces India’s approach to the shifting regional landscape since its independence in 1947. From its leading role in the “nonaligned” movement during the cold war to its current status as a perceived counterweight to China, India often has been an after-thought for global leaders—until they realize how much they needed it.

Kanti Prasad Bajpai is a Professor of Asian Studies at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and the Director of the Centre on Asia and Globalisation.Bajpai is an expert on a range of policy issues, including international relations theory, international security, regional cooperation in South Asia, and Indian security and foreign policy.

Previously, he was Professor of International Politics, Jawaharlal Nehru University and Professor in the Politics and International Relations of South Asia, Oxford University. From 2003 to 2009, he was Headmaster, The Doon School, India. He taught at the Maharajah Sayajirao University of Baroda, and has held visiting appointments at Wesleyan University, Columbia University, and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He has also held visiting appointments at the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace, Notre Dame University, the Brookings Institution, and the Australian Defence Force Academy. Most recently, he was Distinguished Fellow, Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses, New Delhi. Kanti writes a regular column for the Times of India (New Delhi).

In his new book, India Versus China : Why they are not friends, Bajpai decodes the complex history of India–China relations and argues that the path ahead is a difficult one that could see more military confrontations, including violent border clashes. Crucial to the relationship will be India’s ability to reduce the enormous gap with China in economic, military, and even soft power.

A Joint Sem­i­nar on South Asian Pol­i­tics co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown, the Weatherhead Center and South Asia Institute at Harvard and the MIT Center for International Studies


Vaccinating India Against Covid: Lessons from History

START
Fri, Nov 19, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Nov 19, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

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Harish Naraindas is professor of sociology at Jawaharlal Nehru University, and honorary professor at the Alfred Deakin Institute, Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University. He was adjunct faculty at the University of Iowa (2004-19); joint-appointments professor of the Cluster of Excellence, University of Heidelberg (2008-12); visiting professor at the department of sociology, University of Freiburg (2009); and DAAD visiting professor at the department of anthropology, University of Heidelberg (2017). He works on the history and sociology of science and medicine and has published on a range of topics, including an epistemological history of tropical medicine, a comparative history of smallpox from the 18th to the 20th century, on the creolisation of contemporary Ayurveda, on spa medicine in Germany, on pregnancy and childbirth within the context of competing medical epistemes, and recently on how anthropology attempts to explain the non-human. He is currently working on AyurGenomics and P4 medicine; past-life aetiologies and therapeutic trance in German psychosomatic medicine; a multi-sited study of perinatal loss and bereavement in the Anglophone world; and on the pedagogy and practice of obstetrics in India. Among his recent publications are a co-edited special issue of Anthropology and Medicine called ‘The fragile medical: the slippery terrain between medicine, anthropology and societies’ (2017), and two co-edited books: Healing holidays: itinerant patients, therapeutic locales and the quest for health (London: Routledge, 2015), and Asymmetrical conversations: contestations, circumventions and the blurring of therapeutic boundaries (New York: Berghahn, 2014).

Discussant:
Prerna Singh, 
Brown University

A Joint Sem­i­nar on South Asian Pol­i­tics co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown, the Weatherhead Center and South Asia Institute at Harvard and the MIT Center for International Studies


How do Gender Quotas Impact Accountability?

START
Fri, Dec 3, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 3, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

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Zuheir Desai is an assistant Professor in the School of Global and Public Affairs at IE University. His research focuses on electoral competition and political accountability. His work spans both theoretical models of elections, voting, and policymaking, as well as empirical applications of these models on developing democracies such as Brazil and India. Previously, Desai was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University in the 2020-21 academic year. He received my Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Rochester in 2020.

A Joint Sem­i­nar on South Asian Pol­i­tics co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown, the Weatherhead Center and South Asia Institute at Harvard and the MIT Center for International Studies


An Epidemiological Perspective on Whether There Will Be a Third Wave of COVID-19 in India?

START
Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 09:45am

6:30pm IST // 9:00am EST

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As India experiences substantive health and socioeconomic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, the webinar proposes to focus on emerging COVID-19 variants, how vaccines can adapt to these new variants, and how India can mitigate a potential third wave.

Keeping in mind the scale and severity of infection, the COVID-19 vaccines provide hope and are being accelerated at an unprecedented pace in India with a wide variety of scientists continuing to develop new vaccine technologies globally. With vaccines in our armor, the world is expecting to ‘return to pre-COVID times’ but a clear timeline is not available. Through the webinar organized by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health – India Research Center, Project SANCHAR, and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, we aim to interview Dr. William Hanage and Dr. Chandrakant Lahariya on the steps India can take to return to normal.

Speakers

William P. Hanage, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Bill Hanage is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Center for Communicable Diseases at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research and teaching focus on the epidemiology of infectious disease and evolution of infectious agents. He received his PhD from Imperial College London. He joined the faculty at HSPH in 2010. He has made seminal contributions to the study of diverse pathogens, both bacteria and viruses, and has special interest in evolution in response to interventions such as vaccination or antimicrobials, using laboratory based and computational methods.

Chandrakant Lahariya, Physician-Epidemiologist and Public Policy and Health Systems Expert
Dr. Lahariya is a medical doctor and one of India’s leading public policy, vaccines and health systems experts. He has worked with academic institutions and the World Health Organization for more than 13 years. His work focuses on vaccines and vaccination programs, health system strengthening and universal health coverage. In the field of disease outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics, his work is an eclectic mix of academic research, public policy formulation and field implementation. He is amongst the leading Indian experts in the COVID-19 pandemic preparedness and response. 

Moderator

Divya Rajagopal, Former Senior Assistant Editor, Economic Times

Sponsored by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health India Research Center; Project SANCHAR (Science and News: Communicating Health and Research); and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University, Harvard Global Research Support Centre India