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Upcoming SAI Events

Who Should Own Road Safety? Tackling a Hidden Pandemic

START
Thu, May 30, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, May 30, 2019 at 08:00pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
India International Centre
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India

In the past decade, over 1.3 million people have been killed in road crashes in India. Ten times more have been left seriously injured or permanently disabled. The issue has emerged as the single biggest killer of young people in India (15-45 age group). Given the multiplicity of agencies and overlapping responsibilities, where should the accountability lie and who should own the issue to resolve it? Are there learnings from dealing with other epidemics that can be applied to road crashes?

This and more in our next India Seminar Series event with Piyush Tewari, Founder and CEO of SaveLIFE Foundation, a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and Former Mason Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School. Priyank Narayan, Director of the Centre for Entrepreneurship at Ashoka University will moderate the discussion.

The lecture will begin at 6.30 pm (High tea will be served at 6.00 pm).

SAI Events Archive

23rd Annual Harvard India Poetry Meeting

START
Sun, May 19, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Sun, May 19, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

The theme for this year’s India Poetry Reading is “Compassion.” This annual event celebrates India’s contribution to the field of literature and invites local poets to recite original compositions in the language of their choosing. 

This event is presented in partnership with the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University and South Asian Poets of New England.

Please contact Bijoy Misra (bmisra@fas.harvard.edu) or Chandu Shah (bostonwale@gmail.com) for more information.

The Covenant of Love: The Poetry, Music and Spirituality of South Asian Muslim Cultures

START
Sun, May 5, 2019 at 07:00pm

END
Sun, May 5, 2019 at 08:30pm

COST   General public: $10
Students and Harvard ID holders: Free

Misaq-e-Ishq means The Covenant of Love and during this event Ali Asani ’77 (professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures at Harvard); Pakistani pop star and author Ali Sethi ’06; and vocalist, guitarist and Grammy Award-winning producer Noah Georgeson will bring alive through musical performance, the poetic consciousness of several legendary South Asian mystic poets.

The Art of the Ghazal: Ali Sethi and Ali Asani

START
Fri, May 3, 2019 at 05:00pm

END
Fri, May 3, 2019 at 07:00pm

VENUE
Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall

ADDRESS
Fong Auditorium
Boylston Hall
Harvard Yard
Cambridge, MA

In this demonstration, Pakistani musical sensation Ali Sethi and Harvard Professor Ali Asani will take you into the lyrical world of ghazals. The ghazal originated in Arabia in the 7th century and developed into a significant literary genre in Persian, Urdu, and other South Asian languages. It may be understood as a poetic expression of loss and romantic love, often associated with traditions of spirituality in South Asia.

Experience the emotional journey of Sufi music through performance and demonstration as Sethi and  Asani trace the history, evolution, and form of popular Urdu ghazals to date. All texts will be translated into English so everyone can be fully immersed in the art of the ghazal.

Hinduism in Nepal: The Ritual Dimension

START
Thu, May 2, 2019

END
Fri, May 3, 2019

VENUE
Science Center Hall A

ADDRESS
Science Center Hall A
Harvard University
Cambridge MA 02138

As part of the Nepal Studies Program, Professor Michael Witzel from Harvard University will lead a conference titled “Hinduism in Nepal: The Ritual Dimension.” Ritual has played a major role in Hindu societies, from the Vedas to modern times, and it has been particularly prominent in Nepalese society. It accompanies individuals from morning until night, from birth to death, and it shapes the customs of society throughout the year. This conference will explore some of the rituals, past and present, that are typical for Nepal. Stress is put on the extensive documentation that has been carried out over the past few decades, with a particular focus on fire rituals.

Engaging with India: Engaging with Feminism

START
Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 07:30pm

COST   Free

VENUE
Harvard University
Loeb House

ADDRESS
Harvard University
Loeb House
17 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA
02138

Engaging with India: Engaging with Feminism and the Passion of “The Before Midnight’s Children”

Speaker: Devaki Jain, Economist, Writer, and Recipient of the Padma Bhushan Award

The Harish C. Mahindra Lecture Series is given in honor of the late Harish C. Mahindra, a distinguished alumnus of Harvard College and a visionary leader of business and industry in India. The lecture is an important component in continuing the education and understanding of the challenges facing South Asia, and provides an ideal forum for the next generation of global leadership.

This year, Devaki Jain will be giving the Mahindra Lecture. Devaki Jain is an Indian economist and writer who has made significant contributions to feminist economics, social justice, and women’s empowerment in India. In 2006, she was awarded the Padma Bhushan — the third-highest civilian honor from the Government of India — for her contributions to society. In this lecture, she will weave her own personal story into the political story of India and discuss her engagement with public life, activism, and her current work in feminist economics.

A reception will follow the lecture. This event is free and open to the public. 

Film Screening: Amar Kanwar — Such a Morning

START
Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 07:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 09:00pm

COST   $12

Amar Kanwar (b. 1964) is a New Delhi-based filmmaker and artist whose work has powerfully mined the potential of a slower, drifting method of moving image to forge a politically charged and engaged mode of gently expanded cinema. Kanwar’s critically acclaimed yet fiercely debated Such a Morning hovers on the border between magical realist allegory and slow cinema trance film with an almost Calvino-like fable of a renowned mathematician impulsively abandoning his university post, without explanation, to hibernate in a train car abandoned deep in a lush forest.

Artist Talk: Amar Kanwar

START
Thu, Apr 18, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 18, 2019 at 08:00pm

Amar Kanwar presents an artist talk. The following evening on Friday, April 19, 7 pm, Such a Morning will be screened at the Harvard Film Archive.

Both Amar Kanwar programs are presented in collaboration with The Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard Film Archive, Film Study Center, and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University.

Book Talk: Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia

START
Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Dr. Shenila Khoja-Moolji is Assistant Professor of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at Bowdoin College. Her work examines the interplay of gender, race, religion, and power in transnational contexts, particularly in relation to Muslim populations.

Dr. Khoja-Moolji is the author of Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia. She combines historical and cultural analyses with ethnography to examine the meaning of the “educated girl” figure in colonial India and postcolonial Pakistan. Through her work, she has deepened the scholarship on the evolving politics of educational reform and development campaigns. Dr. Khoja-Moolji argues that advocacy for women’s and girl’s education is not simply about access, but more concerned with producing ideal Muslim women and girls with specific relationships to patriarchy, paid work, Islam, and the nation-state. As such, the discourse on girl’s and women’s education also encompasses issues in class relations, religion, and the nation.

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

South Asia Symposium: Challenges Facing the Leaders of Tomorrow

START
Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 09:00am

END
Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Starr Auditorium
Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
Starr Auditorium
Harvard Kennedy School
79 J. F. Kennedy Street,
Cambridge, MA

The South Asian countries are tied through a common heritage and similar socio-economic problems. However, despite its geopolitical sensitivity and human resource potential, there has been limited discussion on the possible areas of cooperation and barriers to such cooperation in the South Asian region. With the proposed USA withdrawal from Afghanistan and recent tensions between India and Pakistan, the conversation on South Asia has never been more relevant than it is today.

This event is co-sponsored by the South Asia Engagement group, the Centre for Economic Research in Pakistan, and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute. 

De Facto Suffrage: A Field Experiment to Improve Women’s Turnout in Pakistan’s General Elections

START
Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 12, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Sarah Khan, Postgraduate Associate, Yale MacMillan Center

Sarah Khan is a postgraduate associate at the Yale MacMillan Center. Her research interests lie at the intersection of gender and comparative politics, with a regional specialization in South Asia. In her work, she explores gender gaps in political preferences, and the barriers to women’s participation and substantive representation in Pakistan. Additionally, she explores questions related to the prevention of violence against women. Her research has been generously supported by grants from the American Institute of Pakistan Studies, the Abdul Jameel Poverty Action Lab (JPAL) Governance Initiative, and the National Science Foundation.

Khan has worked with Ali Cheema, Shandana Mohmand, and Asad Liaqat to research potential pathways to increasing women’s voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, culminating in a paper entitled “Exercising Her Right: Civic and Political Action as Pathways for Increasing Women’s Turnout in Pakistan.” According to the team, “there is a large and persistent gender gap in voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, making for a heavily male-skewed electorate in all levels of Pakistani elections. This has implications both for the quality of democracy, and for women’s substantive representation in politics.”

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