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Upcoming SAI Events


Wed, September 26, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S020 Belfer

The Riyaaz Qawwali Ensemble: A Journey of Cultures and Faiths Through Qawwali

The Riyaaz Qawwali ensemble was established on a college campus in the US 12 years ago. Since then, it has toured the country, debuting in Europe in 2017. Artistic Director and founder of Riyaaz Qawwali, Sonny Mehta, will share his personal story from learning classical music to performing qawwali, the musical genre commonly associated with the Sufi tradition in South Asia. He will demonstrate the basics of qawwali, unfolding the relevant musical elements, poetry and important performance aspects. With the backdrop of the history of qawwali in the US, he will share Riyaaz Qawwali’s journey and how the ensemble has found its voice through performances – breaking, in the process, cultural and religious barriers.

Muslim Societies in South Asia Series, chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard Univerity

Co-sponsored by The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program and the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education

https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif

 

START
Wed, Sep 26, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Sep 26, 2018 at 07:30pm

COST: Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Thu, September 27, 2018 from 06:00pm - 08:00pm  /  India International Center  /  Kamala Devi Complex  /  Seminar Hall 3

Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis

Join us for our ongoing India Seminar Series to discuss the growing challenge of Water Fluorosis, in a discussion titled, ‘Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis’

There are about 66 million people in India suffering from toxic levels of fluoride in their drinking water, these are mostly poor people in rural communities in dry / arid area that must depend of groundwater as their drinking water source. Fluoride is a vicious toxic ion in the sense that it affects and attacks the poor far more aggressively that it affects those nutritionally better off. It also is very effective in ruining the lives of very young people who then suffer from serious bone deformation (skeletal fluorosis) and its harmful economic, social, and psychological effects.

The panelists for this discussion include,

 – Dr. Andrew Z. Haddad- ITRI-Rosenfeld Postdoctoral Fellow, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

 – Srikrishna Sridhar Murthy- Founder and CEO, Sattva Consulting

 – Dr. Sunderrajan Krishnan- Executive Director, INREM Foundation

To RSVP write to mittalinsitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu and confirm your presence at the event.

START
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 08:00pm

Fri, September 28, 2018 from 03:00pm - 05:00pm  /  Harvard Book Store

Book Talk | Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries with Tarun Khanna

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and Harvard Book Store welcome TARUN KHANNA—the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School—for a discussion of his latest book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries.

About Trust

Entrepreneurial ventures often fail in the developing world because of the lack of something taken for granted in the developed world: trust. Over centuries, the developed world has built customs and institutions such as enforceable contracts, an impartial legal system, and credible regulatory bodies—and even unofficial but respected sources of information such as Yelp and Consumer Reports—that have created a high level of what scholar and entrepreneur Tarun Khanna calls “ambient trust.”

This is not the case in the developing world. But Khanna shows that rather than become casualties of mistrust, smart entrepreneurs can adopt the mindset that, like it or not, it’s up to them to weave their own independent web of trust—with their employees, their partners, their clients, their customers, and society as a whole. This can be challenging, and it requires innovative approaches in places where the level of societal mistrust is so high that an official certification of quality simply arouses suspicion—and lowers sales! Using vivid examples from Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and elsewhere, Khanna’s stories show how entrepreneurs can build on existing customs and practices instead of trying to push against them. He highlights the role new technologies can play (but cautions that these are not panaceas) and explains how entrepreneurs can find dependable partners in national and local governments to create impact at scale.

As far back as the 18th century, Adam Smith recognized trust as what Khanna calls “the hidden engine of economic progress.” “Frankness and openness conciliate confidence,” Smith wrote. “We trust the man who seems willing to trust us.” That kind of confidence is critical to entrepreneurial success, but in the developing world, entrepreneurs have to establish it through their own efforts. As Khanna puts it, “The entrepreneur must not just create, she must create the conditions to create.”

START
Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 03:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 05:00pm

COST: Free

VENUE
Harvard Book Store

ADDRESS
1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138

Tue, October 2, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  Barker Center 110

Book Talk | Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries with Tarun Khanna

Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School on his new book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries in conversation with Caroline Elkins, Professor of History and African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Free and open to the public; seating is limited.

 

About Trust

Entrepreneurial ventures often fail in the developing world because of the lack of something taken for granted in the developed world: trust. Over centuries, the developed world has built customs and institutions such as enforceable contracts, an impartial legal system, and credible regulatory bodies—and even unofficial but respected sources of information such as Yelp and Consumer Reports—that have created a high level of what scholar and entrepreneur Tarun Khanna calls “ambient trust.”

This is not the case in the developing world. But Khanna shows that rather than become casualties of mistrust, smart entrepreneurs can adopt the mindset that, like it or not, it’s up to them to weave their own independent web of trust—with their employees, their partners, their clients, their customers, and society as a whole. This can be challenging, and it requires innovative approaches in places where the level of societal mistrust is so high that an official certification of quality simply arouses suspicion—and lowers sales! Using vivid examples from Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and elsewhere, Khanna’s stories show how entrepreneurs can build on existing customs and practices instead of trying to push against them. He highlights the role new technologies can play (but cautions that these are not panaceas) and explains how entrepreneurs can find dependable partners in national and local governments to create impact at scale.

As far back as the 18th century, Adam Smith recognized trust as what Khanna calls “the hidden engine of economic progress.” “Frankness and openness conciliate confidence,” Smith wrote. “We trust the man who seems willing to trust us.” That kind of confidence is critical to entrepreneurial success, but in the developing world, entrepreneurs have to establish it through their own efforts. As Khanna puts it, “The entrepreneur must not just create, she must create the conditions to create.”

START
Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 07:30pm

COST: Free

Wed, October 3, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  India International Center: Annexe Building: Lecture Room- I  /  New Delhi

Gender, Violence and Vulnerabilities of Adolescents in India

 

As part of our ongoing India Seminar Series, we are partnering with the Center on Gender Equity and Health, UC San Diego for a talk titled, ‘Gender, Violence and Vulnerabilities of Adolescents in India’ by Dr. Anita Raj, Tata Chancellor Professor of Medicine, Director of Center on Gender Equity & Health (Department of Medicine), UC San Diego. Dr. Raj will present research on adolescent risk for early marriage, family violence and sexual assault, and the role these have on mental health concerns for both adolescent girls and boys. Policy and program implications based on these findings will be discussed.

To RSVP write to mittalinsitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu and confirm your presence at the event.

 

START
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 07:30pm

Thu, October 4, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

India-Pakistan Crises: Risks, Opportunities, and Options for US Crisis Management

In this seminar, with support from the Harvard University Asia Center, Dr. Yusuf will present his research on US role in India-Pakistan crisis management captured in his latest book Brokering Peace in Nuclear Environments: U.S. Crisis Management in South Asia . The book proposes an original theory, brokered bargaining, to study regional nuclear crises and specifically US role in crisis management. Drawing upon India-Pakistan crises since their nuclear tests in 1998 (Kargil, 2001-02 standoff, Mumbai, surgical strikes episode 2016, etc.), he will explain the risks of India-Pakistan crises and how they intersect with US and other great power interests and for India and Pakistan’s ability to make strategically independent decisions in times of crises. He will also discuss the prospects of future crises versus dispute resolution between these two South Asian nuclear rivals.

About the Speaker:

Moeed W. Yusuf is the associate vice president of the Asia center at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Before joining USIP, Yusuf was a fellow at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University, and concurrently a research fellow at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center at Harvard Kennedy School. He has also worked at the Brookings Institution. In 2007, he co-founded Strategic and Economic Policy Research, a private sector consultancy firm in Pakistan. Yusuf has also consulted for a number of Pakistani and international organizations including the Asian Development Bank, World Bank, and the Stockholm Policy Research Institute, among others.

Yusuf is teaching peacebuilding at George Washington University and Boston University this summer. He has previously taught at Boston University and Quaid-e-Azam University. He writes regularly for Dawn, Pakistan’s leading English daily.

Yusuf’s books South Asia 2060: Envisioning Regional Futures (Adil Najam and Moeed Yusuf, eds.) and Getting it Right in Afghanistan (Scott Smith, Moeed Yusuf, and Colin Cookman, eds.) were published by Anthem Press, UK and U.S. Institute of Peace Press respectively in 2013. He is also the editor of Pakistan’s Counter-terrorism Challenge (Georgetown University Press, 2014) and Insurgency and Counterinsurgency in South Asia: From a Peacebuilding Lens (U.S. Institute of Peace Press, 2014). Yusuf has served on a number of important task forces, advisory councils, working groups, and governing boards, both in the U.S. and Pakistan. In 2013, he was selected to Nobel laureate, Pugwash International’s ‘Council’ (governing body) and subsequently became the youngest member ever to be included in its global executive committee to serve a six-year term.

He holds a Masters in International Relations and PhD in Political Science from Boston Universit

START
Thu, Oct 4, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Thu, Oct 4, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Tue, October 9, 2018 from 06:00pm - 08:00pm  /  Barker Center 110

Panel Discussion: Democracy in Distress in South Asia

Panelists

Sugata Bose
Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Rohit De
Assistant Professor of History, Yale University

Sreenivasan Jain
Anchor and Managing Editor, New Delhi Television Limited (NDTV)

Ayesha Jalal
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Tufts University

Moderator

Homi Bhabha
Director, Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard

START
Tue, Oct 9, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 9, 2018 at 08:00pm

COST: Free

Wed, October 10, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

The Great Indian Migration Wave

Join visiting scholar Chinmay Tumbe and moderator Ian Talbot for a discussion about the great Indian Migration wave.  In this seminar, Tumbe provides an overview of his book, India Moving: A History of Migration, that attempts to explain when, how and why people have moved to, from and within the subcontinent over centuries. It reveals one of the world’s largest, longest and on-going episodes of labour migration, referred to as the Great Indian Migration Wave, and its significance in modern Indian history. It provides a new perspective on the migration of business communities both within and outside India. It shows how 25 million people who trace their roots to India in the past three centuries, were dispersed across the world from Japan to Jamaica and why internal diasporas matter as much as international diasporas. It documents the mass migrations caused by multiple Partitions, refugee crises and other displacements in Indian history and their disproportionate impact on particular communities. And finally, it provides a perspective on migration and development, in history and in 21st century India.

Chinmay Tumbe is faculty member of the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad and the 2018 Alfred D. Chandler Jr International Visiting Scholar in Business History at Harvard Business School. He works on migration, cities, firms and history. He chairs the IIMA Archives initiative and coordinates the History Internship series at IIMA. An alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science and the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, he has been a faculty member at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyderabad and was the 2013 Jean Monnet Fellow at the Migration Policy Centre, European University Institute, Florence, Italy. He has published widely on migration for a decade and has served on policymaking groups.

START
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST: Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Mon, October 15, 2018 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm

The Emerging Markets Technological Revolution: Financial Inclusion & Development Through Digitization

POSTPONED- Please check back for rescheduled date in October

Nadeem Hussain, founder of Telenor Microfinance Bank, is globally recognized for his dedication and service to financial inclusion. He has chaired the United Nation’s MDG Session on Financial Inclusion, is a frequent speaker at international forums on branchless banking and microfinance, and has held numerous board and committee positions in the sector. He will discuss the technological revolution taking place across emerging markets, analogous to the 19th century Industrial Revolution in the West in terms of the transformational impact on development and society.

Chair: Asim KhwajaSumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard University 

START
Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 05:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 07:00pm

Fri, October 19, 2018 at 02:00pm  /  Watson Institute at Brown University

Does Rising Education Lead Changing Gender Norms in India?

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Sonalde Desai, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland

Sonalde Desai is a demographer whose work deals primarily with social inequalities in developing countries with a particular focus on gender and class inequalities. She studies inequalities in education, employment and maternal and child health outcomes by locating them within the political economy of the region. While much of her research focuses on South Asia, she has also engaged in comparative studies across Asia, Latin America and Sub Saharan Africa. She has published articles in a wide range of sociological and demographic journals including American Sociological Review, Demography, Population and Development Review and Feminist Studies. Professor Desai is currently examining changes in the nature and composition of Indian middle classes in the context of India’s movement from state-capitalism to market-capitalism and increasing involvement in the global economy.

 

Location: 

Birkelund Board Room, Watson Institute

111 Thayer Street, Providence, Rhode Island

START
Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 19, 2018

VENUE
Watson Institute at Brown University

ADDRESS
Watson Institute at Brown University, 111 Thayer Street Providence, RI

Mon, October 22, 2018 - Fri, October 26, 2018

Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

For more information, please visit https://worldwide.harvard.edu/worldwide-week

 

START
Mon, Oct 22, 2018

END
Fri, Oct 26, 2018

Thu, October 25, 2018 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm

Missing Matrons in a History of Wealth

Indrani Chatterjee, Professor of History, University of Texas at Austin

Chair: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, Harvard University

 

START
Thu, Oct 25, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Thu, Oct 25, 2018 at 07:00pm

COST: Free

Tue, October 30, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S030

Visiting Artist Program Lecture

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute’s Visiting Artist Fellowship (VAF) is an eight-week research fellowship at Harvard that connects artists from South Asia to Harvard’s intellectual resources. The Fellowship provides a platform for conducting independent research that explores critical issues in South Asia through the lens of art and design. The program welcomes applications from mid-career artists in South Asia to come to Harvard University to participate in interdisciplinary discourse with students and faculty on global issues relevant to South Asia.

In this lecture, these fellows will discuss the work they have created over the past year, and comment on their experience during their time in Cambridge.

START
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Wed, October 31, 2018 from 04:00pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel Concourse

Center for Government & International Studies Trick or Treat!

Explore the globe this Halloween!

  • Visit the international centers in CGIS South and CGIS Knafel (1730 and 1737 Cambridge Street)
  • Learn more about programs and funding opportunities
  • Enjoy some delicious holiday treats

 

Participating centers: Asia Center, Center for African Studies, Committee on Regional Studies East Asia, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, History Department, Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Korea Institute, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

START
Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST: Free

VENUE
CGIS Knafel Concourse

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Fri, November 2, 2018 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

Join Vijayendra Rao in a seminar discussing his paper “Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Analysis of Indian Village Assemblies” (Co-authored with R. Parthasarathy and N. Palaniswamy).

Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, a Lead Economist in the Research Department of the World Bank, integrates his training in economics with theories and methods from anthropology, sociology and political science to study the social, cultural, and political context of extreme poverty in developing countries.

He leads the Social Observatory, an inter-disciplinary effort to improve the conversation between citizens and governments. It does this – first – by improving the quality of civic action by strengthening forums for deliberation and developing tools to facilitate collective action, and – second – by building the “adaptive capacity” of large-scale anti-poverty projects;  i.e. the ability of projects to make everyday decisions, and modify project design, on the basis of high-quality descriptive, evaluative and process-oriented information.

His research has spanned a wide variety of subjects including participatory development, deliberative democracy, the rise in dowries in India, the determinants and consequences of domestic violence, the economics of sex work, public celebrations, and culture and development policy.

 

The paper he will be discussing during this seminar can be accessed here

START
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Wed, November 7, 2018 - Thu, November 8, 2018

Urban Resilience Asia Pacific Conference 2018

While urbanisation brings unprecedented social and economic opportunity, it also increases the threat of disasters, with greater concentrations of people living in dangerous places, such as those living in coastal areas, on land that floods, or on marginalised land.

Asia Pacific is one of the world’s fastest urbanising regions. It is also home to the largest number of people living in low-income settlements. The region is susceptible to a wide range of natural hazards, including flood, windstorms, earthquake, volcano, tsunami and landslide. Climate change is also expected to contribute to sea level rise, stronger windstorms and higher temperatures, increasing urban risk and exacerbating migration.

To address this, Sustainable Development Goal 11 has identified resilience as a key approach for creating inclusive, safe and sustainable cities.

This two-day conference invites practitioners, researchers and decision-makers from all disciplines to present, discuss, debate and recommend realizable social, physical, political and economic measures that build resilience in the Asia Pacific region. The guiding question is, how can vulnerable, low-income neighborhoods in fast-growing cities in the Asia Pacific region become more resilient to disasters and climate change?

For more information or to register, please visit https://www.urap2018.com/registration-2/

 

START
Wed, Nov 7, 2018

END
Thu, Nov 8, 2018

Mon, November 19, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Urbanization Seminar: Mrinalini Rajagopalan

Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of History of Art & Architecture, University of Pittsburgh, is a historian of India’s built environment and is particularly interested in the impact of colonialism and nationalism on the architectural, urban, and preservation cultures of modern South Asia. Her first monograph Building Histories: The Archival and Affective Lives of Five Monuments in Modern Delhi (University of Chicago Press, 2016) traces the modern lives of five medieval monuments in India’s capital city, Delhi, and brings attention to their contested histories, unexpected uses, and ideological appropriations by state and non-state actors. This book received the Alice Davis Hitchcock Award from the Society of Architectural Historians in 2018.

She is currently developing two new research projects. The first traces the built works of Begum Samru—a wealthy dowager who rose from modest beginnings as a dancing girl to become the independent ruler of a prosperous territory in nineteenth-century North India. The second, and more ambitious project, investigates the various architectural products built, commissioned, and patronized by the Tata Corporation during India’s long twentieth-century transformation from a European colony to a socialist nation and most recently to an economically-liberal state eager to participate in global markets.

START
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Sat, December 8, 2018 at 04:00pm

Symposium: Trace: Artisanal Intelligence, Material Agency, and Ritual Technology in South Asian Art

The ‘material turn’ in art history opened new avenues for research with fresh approaches that shift our attention from considering an object as a static thing in an absolute state to putting more emphasis on the process of making and its use and reuse. A chipped area in a miniature painting is no longer an unfortunate loss but a site of excavation for information about material conditions of production and use, while unfinished surface in a stone sculpture provides a laboratory to explore artisans’ hands at work. This symposium brings together scholars whose research embraces methodological interventions and theoretical implications of art history’s material turn in the field of South Asian art and architecture, mostly focusing on the period between 500 CE and 1500CE.  Thematically organized, papers demonstrate how attending to thingness and the process of making helps reveal hitherto invisible connections across time and space.  Going beyond the rubric of material agency, papers also explore the importance of considering somatic intelligence and ritual technology that developed to activate power and sacrality of objects and buildings in Indic religious contexts. Further consideration of ritual knowledge helps situate the trace of time left in matter through artistic mediations in historical and experiential contexts.

Symposium organizer: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, Harvard University

Keynote Speaker: Vidya Dehejia, Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Columbia University

START
Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Sat, Dec 8, 2018

SAI Events Archive


Mon, September 24, 2018 from 04:00pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

Book Launch | Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India

Benjamin Siegel, an assistant professor of History at Boston University and a former fellow at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, will discuss his new book “Hungry Nation: Food Famine, and the making of Modern India”, alongside commentators Prakash Humar, an associate professor of History and Asian Studies at Penn State University, and Rachel Berger, and associate professor of History at Concordia University.

About the Book:

This ambitious new account details independent India’s struggle to overcome famine and malnutrition in the twentieth century. Siegel explains the historical origins of contemporary India’s malnutrition epidemic, showing how food and sustenance moved to the center of nationalist thought in the final years of colonial rule. Hungry Nation interrogates how citizens and politicians contested the meanings of nation building and citizenship through food, and how these contestations receded in the wake of the Green Revolution. This is the story of how Indians challenged meanings of welfare and citizenship across class, caste, region, and gender in a new nation-state.

 

Sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

START
Mon, Sep 24, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Sep 24, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Thu, September 20, 2018 - Sat, September 22, 2018

Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon

There are very few signs that slums will transition out of the urban landscape in the foreseeable future. Even after more than one and a half centuries of policy interventions, starting from efforts to address the effects of industrialization in Europe, slums persist in almost every geography on the planet. Slums are not only visible in the Global South, but are reappearing in old and new manifestations in the Global North. Their persistence can be linked to a number of political and economic failures to effectively address poverty and inequality, distorted land markets, and systemic social exclusion. These failures are, in turn, rooted in the very way policymakers, global media, and intellectuals conceptualize and represent how, why, and by whom slums are produced, maintained, and reproduced. Slums continue to be imagined as urban aberrations, something that falls outside of (or delinked from) urban ecologies.

Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon is a symposium being held at Harvard University from September 20-22, 2018 that will challenge participants to discuss the range of perceptions and systemic changes needed to re-imagine integrative urban and social landscapes, as well as the labor and land markets that most often underpin the formation of slums. Organized by the Harvard Graduate School of Design Department of Urban Planning and DesignHarvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, and Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the symposium seeks to advance new policy, financial, design, and educational tools that can both improve existing slums and generate alternatives to future ones.

A diverse group of academic, policy, design and media experts, as well as community representatives will bridge historically siloed narratives about slums and discuss innovative ways to address them.

Confirmed speakers include: 

  • Somsook Boonyabancha, Asian Coalition for Housing Rights
  • Martha Chen, Harvard Kennedy School and WIEGO
  • Michael Cohen, The New School
  • Alejandro de Castro Mazarro, Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development (2019)
  • Fernando de Mello, URBEM Institute of Urbanism and Studies for the Metropolis
  • Alejandro Echeverri, Center for Urban and Environmental Studies of EAFIT University; Former Loeb Fellow
  • Brodwyn Fischer, University of Chicago
  • George Galster, Wayne State University
  • Sumila Gulyani, The World Bank
  • Alejandro Haiek Coll, LAB.PRO.FAB
  • Chris Herbert and David Luberoff, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies
  • João Marcos de Almeida Lopes and Luiza Sassi, Usina Centro de Trabalho para o Ambiente Habitado
  • Jorge Francisco Liernur, University Torcuato di Tella
  • Ranjani Mazumdar, Jawaharlal Nehru University
  • George McCarthyEnrique Silva, and Martim O. Smolka, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
  • Rahul Mehrotra, Harvard Graduate School of Design and RMA Architects
  • Sheela Patel, Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centres
  • Janice Perlman, The Mega-Cities Project
  • Edgar Pieterse, African Centre for Cities
  • Lyvia Rodriguez, Executive Director, El Cano Martin Pena ENLACE Project
  • Michael Uwemedimo, Collaborative Media Advocacy Platform and University of Roehampton
  • Charlotte Vorms, University of Paris
  • Peter Ward and Jacob Wegmann, University of Texas at Austin
  • Theresa Williamson, Catalytic Communities
  • Nicholas You, Global Business Alliance
  • M. Lorena Zárate, Habitat International Coalition

The symposium, which is free and open to the public (registration required), will be held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and the Harvard Center for Government and International Studies (CGIS). It starts on the evening of Thursday, September 20, with a keynote about the representation of slums in film and media at the Harvard GSD and continues on Friday and Saturday, September 21 and 22 at CGIS with full days of presentations and discussions.

REGISTER TO ATTEND (Registration closes September 19.)

FULL AGENDA

Co-Sponsor(s): Lincoln Institute of Land Policy , Harvard Graduate School of Design Department of Urban Planning, Loeb Fellowship

Schedule:

September 20: 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm

September 21: 8:00 am – 9:00 pm

September 22: 8:00 am – 7:00 pm

 

START
Thu, Sep 20, 2018

END
Sat, Sep 22, 2018

Wed, September 19, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Prevention Science in Child Protection: An Indian Case Study

This seminar, with support from the Harvard University Asia Center, will explore the early findings of a research project that examines community-level strategies to prevent violence, abuse, and exploitation of children in India.

START
Wed, Sep 19, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Sep 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST: Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Fri, September 7, 2018 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Constructing a Majority: A Micro-Level Study of Voting Patterns in Indian Elections

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Francesca R. Jensenius, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Oslo, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs

Chair: Emmerich Davies, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

 

Francesca Jensenius specializes in comparative politics, comparative political economy, and research methods, with a regional focus on South Asia and Latin America. Her main research interest is how institutional design and electoral dynamics affect different types of inequality. In the book Social Justice through Inclusion: The Consequences of Electoral Quotas in India (OUP 2017), she explored long-term effects of electoral quotas for the Scheduled Castes in India. In current projects she focus on the relationship between political institutions, electoral dynamics, and local-level development patterns in India, as well as on a how legal regimes and legal change across the world differentially affect women and other marginalized communities.

START
Fri, Sep 7, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 7, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Wed, September 5, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South Concourse

Welcome Back Mixer

Celebrate the start of the school year with the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute. Meet our team and learn about funding opportunities that are available to students and fellows, and see about the various South Asia-related students group at Harvard. There will be free tea and snacks, and all are welcome!

START
Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST: Free

VENUE
CGIS South Concourse
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Mon, August 27, 2018 from 05:30pm - 07:30pm  /  Bengaluru  /  Microsoft Research

Fireside Chat with Tarun Khanna & Manish Sabharwal

Join the Harvard Business School India Research Centre and the HBS Club of India for a Fireside Chat with Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, HBS, and Manish Sabharwal, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman, TeamLease for a conversation about Prof. Khanna’s recent book, Trust: Creating the Foundations for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries.

 

Agenda

5:30-6:00 PM Registration, Tea & Networking

6:00-7:00 PM Fireside Chat

7:00-7:30 PM Q & A

 

Please RSVP here

 

Location:

Microsoft Research
9, Vigyan, Lavelle Road, Ashok Nagar
Bengaluru, Karnataka 560001

START
Mon, Aug 27, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Mon, Aug 27, 2018 at 07:30pm

Sat, August 25, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:30pm  /  American Center  /  New Delhi

India Seminar Series: ‘Unspoken Story’

As part of our ongoing India Seminar Series, we are partnering with Sangath and It’s Ok To Talk for an event titled ‘Unspoken Story’ with Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School, in a conversation about mental health. This event is supported by Welcome Trust and the American Centre, and is also in partnership with Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS), USA.

 

 

 

START
Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 06:30pm

Thu, August 9, 2018 at 06:00pm  /  CSMVS Museum, Mumbai  /  Visitors' Centre Auditorium

Art and Science of the Forbes Pigment Collection | Color and Pigments in India Painting

Please join us for this two-part lecture cosponsored by Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) and supported by Jai & Sugandha Hiremath – Hikal Ltd. An invitation to this event may be found here

 

Art and Science of the Forbes Pigment Collection by Narayan Khandekar

Dr Narayan Khandekar tells us about the Forbes Pigment Collection. It will cover the reasons why Edward Waldo Forbes started collecting pigments, how the collection grew, new additions to the collection and how it is used now by using case studies from the activities of the Straus Centre for Conservation and Technical Studies.

Narayan Khandekar leads the Strauss Center’s conservation and research activities, as well as those for the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art. Specializing in the scientific analysis of paintings and painted surfaces, he has published extensively on the subject. He curates the Forbes Pigment Collection and the Gettens Collection of Binding Media and Varnishes.

Color and Pigments in Indian Painting by Jinah Kim

How blue is Krishna? Does the Sankrit term “kṛṣṇa” mean blue? Color experience is highly subjective, and color terms pose semiotic challenges. A fluid semantic range in Sanskrit makes it even more challenging to identify which color a color term denotes. Here, the data gleaned from scientific analysis of pigments and the study of material and physical aspects of paintings as objects can help unpack the role of artists in shaping the way we see color. Identifying pigments in use in Indian miniature painting and reading them in close comparison with the colors discussed in theoretical texts and artistic treatises, afford us a glimpse into artists’ intimate, embodied knowledge of each color’s material properties.  This talk will demonstrate how efforts to contextualize the analytical data on pigments with art historical questions can help advance our understanding of color and pigments in the history of painting beyond a matter of confirmation of a pigment’s use.

Jinah Kim is the Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture. Professor Kim’s research and teaching interests cover a broad range of topics with special interests in intertextuality of text-image relationship, art and politics, female representations and patronage, issues regarding re-appropriation of sacred objects, and post-colonial discourse in the field of South and Southeast Asian Art.

 

 

START
Thu, Aug 9, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Aug 9, 2018

VENUE
CSMVS Museum, Mumbai

ADDRESS
159-161 Mahatma Gandhi Road
Fort, Mumbai - 400023, Maharashtra, India


VENUE
Visitors' Centre Auditorium

Thu, July 19, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  India International Center: Annexe Building: Lecture Room- I  /  New Delhi

The Past, Present and Potential Future of Coal in India

 
India’s coal industry is highly contested today. Between the immediacy of coal shortages, the transition to renewable energy, and air pollution problems, the long history of the coal industry and India’s deep economic and social dependence on the fuel gets lost in conversation. In this talk, Rohit Chandra, a PhD graduate at the Harvard Kennedy School, gives a brief historical sketch of the Indian coal industry, and discusses some of the reasons why Coal India as both a company and a developmental actor has persisted, and is likely to persist in the near future. In particular, he will discuss the political and financial adaptations of the Indian coal industry since its nationalization in the early 1970s and some of the characteristics which differentiate it from other PSUs. 
 

START
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 07:30pm