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Upcoming SAI Events


Mon, November 19, 2018 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Delhi Modern: Five Short Stories of a City

Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Associate Professor, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh

Chaired by Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University

How do we tell little histories of grand cities? How do we tell big histories of modest monuments? How can we present alternate histories of a city that has heretofore been told through emperors, colonizers and ambitious architects; monumental mosques, revered tombs, and royal forts; and of extensive urban planning schemes stretching over seven hundred years. What of the poets, travelers, soldiers, refugees, dissidents, archaeologists, and nationalists who lived and worked in Delhi as the city grew around them and sometimes with little regard to them? What can we say about the affective landscape of a city that was the locus of the anger of colonial retribution, the hubris of imperial building, the violence of Partition, the nostalgia of preservation, and the pride of Hindu nationalism? These are the tasks of my presentation, which places subaltern agents and emotional affects as crucial vectors in the building and destruction of Delhi between 1857 and 2000. In doing so, I present alternate urban histories of Delhi that substantially expands the corpus of the city’s makers and their motivations.

START
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Tue, November 27, 2018 from 06:00pm - 08:30pm  /  India International Centre  /  Kamala Devi Complex

Meritocracy: Perspectives from China Past and Present

How should societies identify and promote merit?  Enabling all people to fulfill their full potential and ensuring that competent and capable leaders are selected to govern are central challenges for any society. Failure to meet these challenges can have enormous costs, for individuals and for societies as a whole.  The richness of China’s historical experience and its distinctive current practices offer useful tools for reflection and comparative analysis.  Does the case of China offer any lessons – positive or negative – for India to consider?

START
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 08:30pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India


VENUE
Kamala Devi Complex

Sat, December 8, 2018 at 04:00pm

Symposium: Trace: Artisanal Intelligence, Material Agency, and Ritual Technology in South Asian Art

The ‘material turn’ in art history opened new avenues for research with fresh approaches that shift our attention from considering an object as a static thing in an absolute state to putting more emphasis on the process of making and its use and reuse. A chipped area in a miniature painting is no longer an unfortunate loss but a site of excavation for information about material conditions of production and use, while unfinished surface in a stone sculpture provides a laboratory to explore artisans’ hands at work. This symposium brings together scholars whose research embraces methodological interventions and theoretical implications of art history’s material turn in the field of South Asian art and architecture, mostly focusing on the period between 500 CE and 1500CE.  Thematically organized, papers demonstrate how attending to thingness and the process of making helps reveal hitherto invisible connections across time and space.  Going beyond the rubric of material agency, papers also explore the importance of considering somatic intelligence and ritual technology that developed to activate power and sacrality of objects and buildings in Indic religious contexts. Further consideration of ritual knowledge helps situate the trace of time left in matter through artistic mediations in historical and experiential contexts.

Symposium organizer: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, Harvard University

Keynote Speaker: Vidya Dehejia, Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Columbia University

START
Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Sat, Dec 8, 2018

SAI Events Archive


Fri, November 16, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Transcultural Attractions: American Photographs of an Indian Dancer

AJAY SINHA, Professor of Art History, Mount Holyoke College

Chair: JINAH KIM, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture and Faculty Director, Arts @ Mittal Institute

 

In the Spring of 1938, an Indian dancer, Ram Gopal, posed in a variety of fantastical costumes for the American photographer, Carl Van Vechten, in New York City. Studying over 100 large-size photographs resulting from the photoshoot, the lecture builds an illustrated story of their mutual fascination and exchange, triggered by the camera. The remarkable images, now part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, Yale University, show traces of the myriad, transcultural relations being performed during the photoshoot. They reveal an interplay of differing investments in the image when we ask:  What does the Indian dancer show the camera;  what does the American photographer see through his lens?  Their visual exploration helps us elaborate on an underrepresented history of exchanges between the cultural worlds of India and the U.S. in early-20th century.

START
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Thu, November 15, 2018 at 10:00am to
Fri, November 16, 2018 at 04:00pm  /  William James Hall, 1550

Situating Empire: The Great War and Its Aftermaths

“Situating Empire: The Great War and Its Aftermath” is a two-day graduate student conference. The conference concerns the role of World War I in political and spatial (re)configurations of empire. They keynote address features Professor Heather Streets Salter in conversation with Antoinette Burton.

View the schedule here

START
Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 10:00am

END
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
William James Hall, 1550

ADDRESS
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge MA

Wed, November 14, 2018 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  Thompson Room, Barker Center

From Lahore With Love

Musician and author Ali Sethi (Harvard ‘06) demonstrates and discusses the many ways in which Sufi poets and musicians have encoded a subversive ambiguity into South Asia’s religious-cultural ethos.

START
Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 07:00pm

VENUE
Thompson Room
Barker Center

ADDRESS
12 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Wed, November 7, 2018 - Thu, November 8, 2018

Urban Resilience Asia Pacific Conference 2018

While urbanisation brings unprecedented social and economic opportunity, it also increases the threat of disasters, with greater concentrations of people living in dangerous places, such as those living in coastal areas, on land that floods, or on marginalised land.

Asia Pacific is one of the world’s fastest urbanising regions. It is also home to the largest number of people living in low-income settlements. The region is susceptible to a wide range of natural hazards, including flood, windstorms, earthquake, volcano, tsunami and landslide. Climate change is also expected to contribute to sea level rise, stronger windstorms and higher temperatures, increasing urban risk and exacerbating migration.

To address this, Sustainable Development Goal 11 has identified resilience as a key approach for creating inclusive, safe and sustainable cities.

This two-day conference invites practitioners, researchers and decision-makers from all disciplines to present, discuss, debate and recommend realizable social, physical, political and economic measures that build resilience in the Asia Pacific region. The guiding question is, how can vulnerable, low-income neighborhoods in fast-growing cities in the Asia Pacific region become more resilient to disasters and climate change?

For more information or to register, please visit https://www.urap2018.com/registration-2/

 

START
Wed, Nov 7, 2018

END
Thu, Nov 8, 2018

Sat, November 3, 2018 from 04:00pm - 06:00pm  /  East of Kailash  /  Garhi Ext  /  Lalit Kala Akademi Artist Studio  /  New Delhi

Artist Talk: Trauma and Memory – Healing through Art

As part of the Artist Talk in our India Seminar Series, we are collaborating with the Lalit Kala Akademi (LKA), Govt of India, to host Kabi Raj Lama, a Nepal-based artist and printmaker as well as a former Visiting Artist fellow at the Mittal Institute. Kabi Raj had two direct experiences confronting traumatic natural disasters: the 2011 Tsunami in Japan and the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal. The talk will include the artist’s realization that mental health is often ignored in the process of rebuilding after a natural disaster, and how art can be used as a form of healing from trauma. His work reflects the complexities of disasters through an intimate portrayal of personal encounters, and his current project takes his work to a completely new dimension of art therapy and scientific inquiry.

To RSVP email us at mittalinstitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu.

START
Sat, Nov 3, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Sat, Nov 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

Fri, November 2, 2018 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

Join Vijayendra Rao in a seminar discussing his paper “Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Analysis of Indian Village Assemblies” (Co-authored with R. Parthasarathy and N. Palaniswamy).

Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, a Lead Economist in the Research Department of the World Bank, integrates his training in economics with theories and methods from anthropology, sociology and political science to study the social, cultural, and political context of extreme poverty in developing countries.

He leads the Social Observatory, an inter-disciplinary effort to improve the conversation between citizens and governments. It does this – first – by improving the quality of civic action by strengthening forums for deliberation and developing tools to facilitate collective action, and – second – by building the “adaptive capacity” of large-scale anti-poverty projects;  i.e. the ability of projects to make everyday decisions, and modify project design, on the basis of high-quality descriptive, evaluative and process-oriented information.

His research has spanned a wide variety of subjects including participatory development, deliberative democracy, the rise in dowries in India, the determinants and consequences of domestic violence, the economics of sex work, public celebrations, and culture and development policy.

 

The paper he will be discussing during this seminar can be accessed here

START
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Thu, November 1, 2018 from 11:40am - 01:00pm  /  Taubman 102  /  WAPPP Cason Seminar Room

Does Group Farming Empower Rural Women? India’s Experience

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Development Economics and Environment, University of Manchester; Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor, University of Cambridge
 
Few programs for economically empowering rural women focus primarily on farming—the one occupation in which women have the most experience in largely agrarian economies. Thus, two Indian initiatives–in Telangana and Kerala– stand out. These initiatives are unique because they seek to improve women’s livelihoods within agriculture through an innovative institutional form, namely group farming. In this seminar, Bina Agarwal examines whether pooling land, labor, and capital and cultivating jointly, enables women farmers to overcome resource constraints and outperform individual male farmers in the same regions.

START
Thu, Nov 1, 2018 at 11:40am

END
Thu, Nov 1, 2018 at 01:00pm

Tue, October 30, 2018 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S030

In Focus

A panel discussion on capturing identity, everyday life and activism in South Asia through the digital lens.

 

PANELISTS

AMAN KALEEM and SAMSUL ALAM HELAM

Mittal Institute 2018-19 Visiting Artist Fellows

Chair: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture

START
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Mon, October 29, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:30pm  /  CGIS S 4th Floor Lobby

Visiting Artist Fellowship: Art Exhibition Opening Reception – Shaping the Ordinary through Love and Dreams, South Asian perspectives

Come and meet the Mittal Institute visiting artists, view their work, and grab a drink!

Artists include Aman Kaleem, a filmmaker, and Samsul Alam, a visual artist.

START
Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 06:30pm