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SAI Event Type : Lecture


Gender Quotas and Political Inclusion in India’s Weakly Institutionalized Party System

START
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Tanushree Goyal is a fourth and final year PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. Goyal is also an academy scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Harvard University. Starting in Fall 2022, she will join Princeton University as an Assistant Professor in Politics and International Affairs.

Her research interests lie at the intersections of comparative politics, gender, and development with a regional focus in South Asia. Goyal’s dissertation uses natural, survey, and quasi-experiments to examine important questions in the field of representation and accountability and is set in the context of the World’s largest democracy: India. It shows how female politicians affect change by influencing intra-party politics in the context of India’s urban cities. Female politicians incorporate women as intermediaries and establish cross-electoral level networks to influence political campaigns and party decisions. This “representation from below” fundamentally alters party politics and democracy for good.


Policing and Gendered Cases in India

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Nirvikar Jassal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on gender, sexual violence, ethnic conflict and hate crime, and policing with a regional focus on South Asia. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Asian Survey and Journal of Asian Studies. He completed his PhD from the University of California—Berkeley in 2020, and previously worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and New York City government.


Capacity Beyond Coercion: Regulatory Pragmatism and Compliance Along the India-Nepal Border

START
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Susan L. Ostermann is Assistant Professor of Global Affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She completed her Ph.D. in the Travers Department of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She also holds a law degree from Stanford Law School and worked for several years as a practicing litigator, focusing on class actions and intellectual property disputes.

Employing both quantitative and qualitative methodology, Ostermann seeks to understand why we sometimes see compliance with regulations in very unlikely places: those in which the state is weak and actors, be they individuals or organizations, have strong incentives to break the law. Her dissertation develops the concept of regulatory pragmatism to explain variation in strategies used by both the Nepali and Indian states to secure compliance with conservation, education and child labor regulations under challenging conditions.

While Professor Ostermann’s research focuses mainly on regulatory compliance in South Asia, she is broadly interested in understanding norms and how they change. Towards this end, she has published papers on inter-caste marriage and the role of skin color in Indian politics. Her current projects are designed to explore the historical roots of conservatism in Indian political thought, the development and expansion of the Indian Election Commission, and variation in sex-ratios throughout the subcontinent. She has also published work on the Indian bureaucracy, state capacity in South Asia, and the 2014 Indian general election.

Ostermann’s work has been published in Asian Survey, Studies in Comparative International Development, the Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, Studies in Indian Politics and Law & Policy.


Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.


Business, Voters, and Distributive Politics in Developing Democracies

START
Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 4, 2020

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the event: https://bit.ly/32yhBGS

Gautam Nair, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, will explore the impact of business on developing democracies and inequality.

Gautam Nair is a a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he is a faculty affiliate of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and the Center for International Development. His research is in comparative and international political economy, and focuses primarily on the politics of democracy and redistribution. He has been published in The Journal of Politics and International Organization. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Leitner Political Economy Program at Yale.

This seminar series is co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown University, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

More Info: http://southasianpolitics.net/


Discrimination and Defiant Pride: How the Demand for Dignity Creates Slack for Poor Governance

START
Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the event: https://bit.ly/3iGc1YK

Incoming Assistant Professor of Government Mashail Malik will discuss how social identities shape and are shaped by political life.

Mashail Malik studies how social identities – such as ethnicity and class – both shape and are shaped by political life. Currently a Gerald J. Lieberman Fellow, a Ric Weiland Graduate Fellow, and a Dissertation Fellow at the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, Malik, will begin her appointment as Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard University in fall 2021. Her dissertation project is centered on the politics of ethnicity in Karachi – Pakistan’s largest megacity. Her research agenda further includes topics on political violence, state repression, civil-military relations, and the intersection of identity and economic conflict.

Discussant: Steven Rosenzweig, Boston University

This seminar series is co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown University, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

More Info: http://southasianpolitics.net/


Extreme Urbanism: A View on Afghanistan, Session 1

START
Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 10:30am

END
Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 11:45am

VENUE
Webinar

Session 1: Planning for Urban Afghanistan

This event belongs to a 3-part series. Information on the remaining two events in this series is soon to come.

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92465196034
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/HyDPSfZyGQQ

Until recently, Afghanistan was omnipresent in global news for the past two decades for all of the wrong reasons. As part of the Option studio, Extreme Urbanism VII: Imagining an Urban Future for Ishkashim, offered at the Harvard GSD in the fall of 2020, this workshop/lecture series aims to propose to interested audiences the opportunity to get an updated, informed view on the country.

Addressing primarily architectural, urban, and territorial aspects of Afghanistan, this cycle of talks aims to create a platform where varied topics ranging from vernacular architecture and building traditions to infrastructure and cultural specificities are discussed in conjunction with issues related to historic settlements and contemporary planning in Afghanistan. The speakers will include academics from Harvard University and Kabul University, in addition to global experts, and practitioners working in or on Afghanistan.

Chair
  • Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Speakers
  • Onno Rühl, General Manager, Aga Khan Agency for Habitat
  • Dennis Pieprz, Principal, Sasaki Research
  • Victor Eskinazi, Senior Associate, Urban Designer, Sasaki Research
  • Alykhan Mohamed, Associate, Planner, Sasaki Research
  • Thomas Nideorest, Professional Staff, Landscape Designer, Sasaki Research
  • Einat Rosenkrantz, Senior Associate, Urban Designer, Sasaki Research

This series is organized by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and the Aga Khan Agency for Habitat.


Rediscovering Partition from New Perspectives

START
Tue, Sep 1, 2020 at 10:00am

END
Tue, Sep 1, 2020 at 11:30am

VENUE
Webinar

Partition Webinar Poster
10:00 AM EDT  |  3:00 PM BST  |  7:00 PM PKT  |  7:30 PM IST
Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/95706117879

The impact of the 1947 Partition still ripples throughout South Asia, 73 years later. However, our knowledge of this historic event is constantly being reevaluated by academics and researchers who have continued to illuminate the details of what occurred. This panel will explore how new research efforts help us understand the full depth of the history and legacy of Partition.

Moderator

  • Jennifer Leaning, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Speakers

  • Ian Talbot, Professor of History and Director of the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies, University of Southampton
  • Yaqoob Bangash, Assistant Professor, Information Technology University, Lahore

Registration not required. This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Club of India and the Harvard Club of Pakistan.


Webinar: Entrepreneurs and the COVID-19 Global Reset in South Asia

START
Fri, Jun 5, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Jun 5, 2020 at 10:30am

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

9:00–10:30 AM EST // 6:00–7:30 PM PKT // 6:30–8:00 PM IST // 7:00–8:30 PM BST

Venue: Virtual via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/95880357744

This event will also be streamed on YouTube: https://youtu.be/NhcBsgX5C0M

Panelists

  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Mittal Institute
  • Rajeeb Samdani, Co-Founder and Trustee, Samdani Art Foundation; Managing Director, Golden Harvest Group
  • Osman Khalid Waheed, CEO, Ferozsons Laboratories Limited; Founder and Chair, Lahore Biennale Foundation

Enterprises have found themselves caught in the COVID-19 maelstrom across South Asia. This webinar will explore the extent to which entrepreneurs have been able to work with both the state and civil society to limit the damage and distress caused by the pandemic, but also to begin exploring new opportunities that a possible “global reset” has opened up to the developing world. 


Citizenship in Crisis: The Anti-CAA Protests and the Future of India

START
Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 05:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

The panelists will discuss India’s recent legislation on citizenship and what it means for the nation’s future.

This event is hosted by the Harvard University Asia Center and co-sponsored by the Mittal Institute.

Speakers:

  • Suraj Yengde, Dalit scholar, activist, and postdoctoral fellow, Harvard Kennedy School
  • Esha Meher, Lawyer, Supreme Court of India
  • Hemanth Bharatha Chakravarthy, Sophomore, Harvard College

Moderator:

  • Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Citizenship: History, Policy, and Protests

START
Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 05:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

In South Asia, the current debate around issues of citizenship has ignited divisions and unrest; however, the roots of these issues stretch back much further. This interdisciplinary panel will explore the post-Partition history of citizenship in the region, legal and constitutional developments, and the issues at play on both sides of recent legislation and counter-movements.

Panelists

  • Sana Aiyar, Associate Professor of History, MIT
  • Kalyani Ramnath, Prize Fellow in Economics, History, and Politics, Harvard University
  • Sahana Ghosh, Postdoctoral Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Brown University
  • Suchitra Vijayan, Founder and Executive Director, The Polis Project

Moderator

  • Rohit De, Associate Professor, Yale University

Related Reading

Ashu Varshney gives testimony at USCIRF Hearing on Citizenship Laws and Religious Freedom

 


Meritocracy: Perspectives from China Past and Present

START
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 08:30pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
India International Centre
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India


VENUE
Kamala Devi Complex

How should societies identify and promote merit? Enabling all people to fulfill their full potential and ensuring that competent and capable leaders are selected to govern are central challenges for any society. Failure to meet these challenges can have enormous costs, for individuals and for societies as a whole. The richness of China’s historical experience and its distinctive current practices offer useful tools for reflection and comparative analysis. Does the case of China offer any lessons – positive or negative – for India to consider?


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