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SAI Event Type : Lecture


Afghanistan’s Next Transition: How we got here, and what comes next

START
Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 12:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

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This Harvard University panel, co-sponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies’ Negotiation Task Force, will explore the lead up to the collapse of the Afghan government, as well as what the new Taliban regime means for the future of the country and its people.

Moderator

Arvid Bell, Director, Negotiation Task Force, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies; Lecturer, Government Department, Harvard University.

Panelists

Anand Gopal, Journalist and Author

Fara Abbas, Fellow, Negotiation Task Force, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University; Former Director of Programs, National Security Council, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Philipp Ackermann, Director General, Africa, Latin America, Near and Middle East, German Ministry of Foreign Affairs

 


India at 75: The Global Roots of Independence

START
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 08:00am

END
Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

5:30 PM IST – 7:00 PM IST / 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM ET 

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Since independence in 1947, India has played a considerable role in shaping the world. But the world also played a considerable role in shaping Indian independence. As India approaches the 75th anniversary of its freedom, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, in association with the Harvard Club of India, presents a webinar on how the anti-colonial struggle developed beyond India’s borders, in diaspora settlements and with non-Indian partners. This webinar brings together three scholars—all with previous or current Harvard connections—to examine the overseas careers of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay, Mahendra Pratap, and J.J.Singh.

This event is part of Harvard Worldwide Week, an annual weeklong celebration of the university’s global breadth and depth.

Moderator

Dinyar PatelAssistant Professor, History, SP Jain Institute of Management and Research Affiliate, Mittal Institute, Harvard University

Speakers


Nico Slate
, Professor and Department Head, Department of History, Carnegie Mellon University

Carolien Stolte, Senior Lecturer in History at Leiden University, The Netherlands


COVID-19 in South Asia – A Practitioner’s Workshop: Part 2

Part 2 – High Value Therapeutics

7:00-8:00 pm IST/ 9:30-10:30 am ET

Zoom link for the talk
Stream the talk on YouTube

 

The science and practice of Covid-19 clinical care continues to evolve as new discoveries change our treatment options, management of complications and influence vaccination strategies. The Mittal Institute, with the support of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System, and the Swasth Community Science Alliance, is organizing a series of panel discussions by leading scientists and frontline clinicians on the latest evidence-based updates for COVID-19 care. Our goal through these talks is to assist with the management of COVID-19 and improvement of health outcomes in South Asia.

This session will focus on high value therapeutics for COVID-19 patients, including the latest evidence-based reasoning for their use and impact.

Moderator:

Amita Sudhir, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine 

 

Speakers:

  • Priya Nori, Associate Professor of Medicine & Orthopedic Surgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rajesh T. Gandhi, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Shitij Arora, Associate Professor in Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

COVID-19 in South Asia – A Practitioner’s Workshop: Part 1

Part 1 – Oxygenation and Ventilation: At home and in the hospital

7:30-8:30 pm IST/ 10:00-11:00 am ET

Zoom link for the talk
Stream the talk on YouTube

 

The science and practice of Covid-19 clinical care continues to evolve as new discoveries change our treatment options, management of complications and influence vaccination strategies. The Mittal Institute, with the support of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the  Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System, is organizing a series of panel discussions by leading scientists and frontline clinicians on the latest evidence-based updates for COVID-19 care. Our goal through these talks is to assist with the management of COVID-19 and improvement of health outcomes in South Asia.

This session will share the latest updates on protocols for oxygenation and ventilation in COVID-19 patients, contextualized for resource-limited and rural environments.

Moderator:

Rajani Surendar Bhat, Consultant Physician and Pulmonologist, BoardofDoctors.com

 

Speakers:

  • Paul Sonenthal, Associate Director for Inpatient Medicine and Critical Care, Partners In Health; Pulmonary and Critical Care Physician, Brigham & Women’s Hospital
  • Richa Gupta, Professor and Head of the Department of Respiratory Medicine, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore

A Strong Handoff in U.S.-India Relations

START
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 10:30am

END
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 11:45am

VENUE
Webinar

Register here for the talk. 

Please join the Future of Diplomacy Project for a conversation with Kenneth I. Juster, former U.S. Ambassador to India and HKS alumnus, about the U.S.-India relationship.

Ambassador Juster will discuss major achievements in the U.S.-India partnership in the areas of diplomacy, defense, economic relations, energy, and health over the past four years as well as issues on the horizon such as the rise of China and trade policy. Dean of Harvard Kennedy School, Doug Elmendorf, will introduce Ambassador Juster, and Faculty Chair, Nicholas Burns will moderate this discussion.

Please register in advance for this meeting here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Visit the Future of Diplomacy Project website for full event details. 


Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

START
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 05:00pm

VENUE
Webinar

Registration required for this event: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ANpdh_VUTvKvpvWk4AbGGA

Speaker: Andrew B. Liu, Assistant Professor of History, Villanova University

Tea remains the world’s most popular commercial drink today, and at the turn of the twentieth century, it represented the largest export industry of both China and colonial India. In analyzing the global competition between Chinese and Indian tea, Andrew B. Liu challenges past economic histories premised on the technical “divergence” between the West and the Rest, arguing instead that seemingly traditional technologies and practices were central to modern capital accumulation across Asia. He shows how competitive pressures compelled Chinese merchants to adopt abstract industrial conceptions of time, while colonial planters in India pushed for labor indenture laws to support factory-style tea plantations. Characterizations of China and India as premodern backwaters, he explains, were themselves the historical result of new notions of political economy adopted by Chinese and Indian nationalists, who discovered that these abstract ideas corresponded to concrete social changes in their local surroundings. Together, these stories point toward a more flexible and globally oriented conceptualization of the history of capitalism in China and India.

Andrew B. Liu is assistant professor of history at Villanova University, where his research focuses on China, transnational Asia, political economy, and comparative history.

This event is hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by The Mittal Institute and The Joint Center for History and Economics, Harvard University.


Representation from Below: How Women Mobilize in India’s Weak Party System

START
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Tanushree Goyal is a fourth and final year PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. Goyal is also an academy scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Harvard University. Starting in Fall 2022, she will join Princeton University as an Assistant Professor in Politics and International Affairs. Her research interests lie at the intersections of comparative politics, gender, and development with a regional focus in South Asia. Goyal’s dissertation uses natural, survey, and quasi-experiments to examine important questions in the field of representation and accountability and is set in the context of the World’s largest democracy: India. It shows how female politicians affect change by influencing intra-party politics in the context of India’s urban cities. Female politicians incorporate women as intermediaries and establish cross-electoral level networks to influence political campaigns and party decisions. This “representation from below” fundamentally alters party politics and democracy for good.


Policing and Gendered Cases in India

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

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Nirvikar Jassal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on gender, sexual violence, ethnic conflict and hate crime, and policing with a regional focus on South Asia. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Asian Survey and Journal of Asian Studies. He completed his PhD from the University of California—Berkeley in 2020, and previously worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and New York City government.


Capacity Beyond Coercion: Regulatory Pragmatism and Compliance Along the India-Nepal Border

START
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

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Susan L. Ostermann is Assistant Professor of Global Affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She completed her Ph.D. in the Travers Department of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She also holds a law degree from Stanford Law School and worked for several years as a practicing litigator, focusing on class actions and intellectual property disputes.

Employing both quantitative and qualitative methodology, Ostermann seeks to understand why we sometimes see compliance with regulations in very unlikely places: those in which the state is weak and actors, be they individuals or organizations, have strong incentives to break the law. Her dissertation develops the concept of regulatory pragmatism to explain variation in strategies used by both the Nepali and Indian states to secure compliance with conservation, education and child labor regulations under challenging conditions.

While Professor Ostermann’s research focuses mainly on regulatory compliance in South Asia, she is broadly interested in understanding norms and how they change. Towards this end, she has published papers on inter-caste marriage and the role of skin color in Indian politics. Her current projects are designed to explore the historical roots of conservatism in Indian political thought, the development and expansion of the Indian Election Commission, and variation in sex-ratios throughout the subcontinent. She has also published work on the Indian bureaucracy, state capacity in South Asia, and the 2014 Indian general election.

Ostermann’s work has been published in Asian Survey, Studies in Comparative International Development, the Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, Studies in Indian Politics and Law & Policy.


Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

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Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.


Business, Voters, and Distributive Politics in Developing Democracies

START
Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 4, 2020

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the event: https://bit.ly/32yhBGS

Gautam Nair, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, will explore the impact of business on developing democracies and inequality.

Gautam Nair is a a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he is a faculty affiliate of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and the Center for International Development. His research is in comparative and international political economy, and focuses primarily on the politics of democracy and redistribution. He has been published in The Journal of Politics and International Organization. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Leitner Political Economy Program at Yale.

This seminar series is co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown University, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

More Info: http://southasianpolitics.net/


Discrimination and Defiant Pride: How the Demand for Dignity Creates Slack for Poor Governance

START
Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the event: https://bit.ly/3iGc1YK

Incoming Assistant Professor of Government Mashail Malik will discuss how social identities shape and are shaped by political life.

Mashail Malik studies how social identities – such as ethnicity and class – both shape and are shaped by political life. Currently a Gerald J. Lieberman Fellow, a Ric Weiland Graduate Fellow, and a Dissertation Fellow at the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, Malik, will begin her appointment as Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard University in fall 2021. Her dissertation project is centered on the politics of ethnicity in Karachi – Pakistan’s largest megacity. Her research agenda further includes topics on political violence, state repression, civil-military relations, and the intersection of identity and economic conflict.

Discussant: Steven Rosenzweig, Boston University

This seminar series is co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown University, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

More Info: http://southasianpolitics.net/