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SAI Event Type : Book Talk


Book Talk: A Military History of India Since 1972: Full Spectrum Operations and the Changing Contours of Modern Conflict

START
Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 10:00am

END
Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 11:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the Webinar

Join the Asia Center on June 24, 2021, from 10:00 – 11:15 a.m. EDT for an Asia Center Author Conversation with Arjun Subramaniam, Retired Air Vice Marshal, IAF; President’s Chair of Excellence in National Security, India’s National Defence College. Subramaniam will discuss his recent book, A Military History of India Since 1972: Full Spectrum Operations and the Changing Contours of Modern Conflict with M. Taylor Fravel, Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science; Director, Security Studies Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James Robson, James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations; Victor and William Fung Director of the Harvard University Asia Center will moderate. 

Arjun Subramaniam is the President’s Chair of Excellence in National Security at NDC. He is a retired fighter pilot from the IAF who has flown MiG-21s and Mirage-2000s. He has commanded a MiG-21 Squadron and a large flying base and held several operational, staff, and instructional assignments in the IAF. He is an airpower doctrinal expert having crafted the current IAF doctrine in 2012. He was awarded the Ati Vishisht Seva Medal for distinguished service by the President of India in 2011. A Ph.D. in Defence and Strategic Studies from the Univ of Madras, he has been a Visiting Fellow at The Harvard Asia Center and Oxford Universities, and a Visiting Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Ashoka and Jindal Universities. Currently, he is also an Adjunct Faculty member at the Naval War College. He has lectured extensively at a wide range of Universities, think tanks, and war colleges in India and abroad including Harvard, MIT, Georgetown University, Oxford, Carnegie Endowment, and the International Institute of Strategic Studies. His current areas of focus are international and regional security, contemporary Indian military history, airpower in integrated operations, and the India-China security relationship. He is the author of four books including ‘India’s Wars: A Military History: 1947-1971’ and its newly-released sequel titled ‘A Military History of India since 1972: Full Spectrum Operations and the Changing Contours of Modern Conflict.’

M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and Director of the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Taylor studies international relations, with a focus on international security, China, and East Asia. His books include Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, (Princeton University Press, 2008), and Active Defense: China’s Military Strategy Since 1949 (Princeton University Press, 2019). His other publications have appeared in International Security, Foreign Affairs, Security Studies, International Studies Review, The China Quarterly, The Washington Quarterly, Journal of Strategic Studies, Armed Forces & Society, Current History, Asian Survey, Asian Security, China Leadership Monitor, and Contemporary Southeast Asia. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his Ph.D. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. In 2016, he was named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the Carnegie Corporation. Taylor is a member of the board of directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and serves as the Principal Investigator for the Maritime Awareness Project.

James Robson is the James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and the Victor and William Fung Director of the Harvard University Asia Center. He is also the Chair of the Regional Studies East Asia M.A. program. Robson received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Stanford University in 2002, after spending many years researching in China, Taiwan, and Japan. He specializes in the history of medieval Chinese Buddhism and Daoism and is particularly interested in issues of sacred geography, local religious history, and Chan/Zen Buddhism. He has been engaged in a long-term collaborative research project with the École Française d’Extrême-Orient studying local religious statuary from Hunan province. He is the author of Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak [Nanyue 南嶽] in Medieval China (Harvard, 2009), which was awarded the Stanislas Julien Prize for 2010 by the French Academy of Inscriptions and Belles-Lettres and the 2010 ToshihideNumata Book Prize in Buddhism. Robson is also the author of “Signs of Power: Talismanic Writings in Chinese Buddhism” (History of Religions 48:2), “Faith in Museums: On the Confluence of Museums and Religious Sites in Asia” (PMLA, 2010), and “A Tang Dynasty Chan Mummy [roushen] and a Modern Case of Furta Sacra? Investigating the Contested Bones of ShitouXiqian.” His current research includes a long-term project on the history of the confluence of Buddhist monasteries and mental hospitals in East Asia.

Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, and Harvard-Yenching Institute


Cultivating Trust Can Unlock India’s Potential

START
Thu, Apr 22, 2021 at 12:30am

END
Thu, Apr 22, 2021 at 01:50am

Register here to join the webinar.

Watch the preview video here.

10:00-11:20 am IST // 12:30-1:50 am ET

Join us for the 13th Session of Distinguished Global Indian Speaker Series by Amity University Gurugram, and co-sponsored by The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.

Program:

10:00-10:10 am IST // 12:30-12:40 am ET
Opening Remarks by Prof. (Dr.) Gunjan M. Sanjeev, Vice President, RBEF, Director-International Affairs
Welcome Address by Prof. (Dr) P.B. Sharma,Vice Chancellor, Amity University Gurugram
Words of Wisdom by Dr. Aseem Chauhan, Chancellor, Amity University

10:10-10:15 am IST // 12:40-12:45 am ET
Felicitation Ceremony and Presentation of Virtual Citation to Prof. (Dr.) Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, HBS; Director, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University 

10:15-10:55 am IST // 12:45-1:25 am ET
Special Session: “Cultivating Trust Can Unlock India’s Potential” by Prof. (Dr.) Tarun Khanna

10:55-11:00 am IST // 1:25-1:30 am ET                
Celebrating Three Years of Publication of the Book: Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Emerging Countries, authored by Prof (Dr.) Tarun Khanna 

11:00-11:20 am IST // 1:30-1:50 am ET
Q&A interaction followed by Vote of Thanks by Prof. (Dr) Gunjan M Sanjeev


Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

START
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 05:00pm

VENUE
Webinar

Registration required for this event: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ANpdh_VUTvKvpvWk4AbGGA

Speaker: Andrew B. Liu, Assistant Professor of History, Villanova University

Tea remains the world’s most popular commercial drink today, and at the turn of the twentieth century, it represented the largest export industry of both China and colonial India. In analyzing the global competition between Chinese and Indian tea, Andrew B. Liu challenges past economic histories premised on the technical “divergence” between the West and the Rest, arguing instead that seemingly traditional technologies and practices were central to modern capital accumulation across Asia. He shows how competitive pressures compelled Chinese merchants to adopt abstract industrial conceptions of time, while colonial planters in India pushed for labor indenture laws to support factory-style tea plantations. Characterizations of China and India as premodern backwaters, he explains, were themselves the historical result of new notions of political economy adopted by Chinese and Indian nationalists, who discovered that these abstract ideas corresponded to concrete social changes in their local surroundings. Together, these stories point toward a more flexible and globally oriented conceptualization of the history of capitalism in China and India.

Andrew B. Liu is assistant professor of history at Villanova University, where his research focuses on China, transnational Asia, political economy, and comparative history.

This event is hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by The Mittal Institute and The Joint Center for History and Economics, Harvard University.


Book Talk: Rahul Mehrotra’s “Working in Mumbai”

START
Fri, Nov 13, 2020 at 01:30pm

END
Fri, Nov 13, 2020 at 02:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Rahul Mehrotra will present his new book, Working in Mumbai, with panelists Eve Blau and Mark Lee.

Working in Mumbai is a critical reflection on thirty years of the practice of RMA Architects. Rahul Mehrotra weaves a narrative to connect his multiple engagements in architectural practice, including teaching, research, documenting, writing, and exhibiting since the establishment of the practice in 1990. The book is structured around the subjects of interior architecture, critical conservation, and work and living spaces that straddle the binaries of the global and the local as well as the rural and the urban.

While the book is a portfolio of the selected works of RMA Architects, the projects are curated so as to unravel and clarify the challenges faced by architects in India and in several parts of the “majority” world where issues related to rapid urbanization and the impacts of global capital are among the many that dispute conventional models of practice. Working in Mumbai is used emblematically to interrogate the notion of context and understand how the practice evolved through its association with the city of Bombay/Mumbai.

This Graduate School of Design (GSD) series offers the opportunity for faculty to discuss their recent publications, their research, or their thoughts on teaching. It serves as a forum in which faculty can share and discuss their research and projects while in process, in addition to finished publications. 

How to Join

Register to attend the next lecture here. Once you have registered, you will be provided with a link to join the lecture via Zoom. This link will also be emailed to you. If you have any questions regarding this event, contact lgregory@gsd.harvard.edu.

Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events@gsd.harvard.edu.

This event is organized by the Frances Loeb Library and South Asia Institute.


Maintaining Peace in China-India Relations: Discussion and Book Launch

START
Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 08:30am

END
Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

The China-India relationship is one of the keys to international security, the future of Asia, and the well-being of nearly 3 billion people. Since early May 2020, border tensions between the two powers have underlined the potential for conflict. In 2017, their armies faced off for 73 days. At the same time, they have built a system of engagement designed to manage conflict and their larger rivalry. Their leaders meet regularly, they hold talks on the border quarrel, they have a series of confidence building measures, and they trade and invest with each other. They also cooperate multilaterally.

What are the drivers of the relationship? How can they manage conflict and rivalry? Are there cooperative steps forward, now and looking ahead? Two years ago, the Centre on Asia and Globalization in the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, set out to answer these and other vital questions by working with Routledge UK to produce the Routledge Handbook of China-India Relations. The book was published earlier this year. It assembled experts from China, India, Singapore, other parts of Asia, Australia, Brazil, Europe, and the United States and has 35 chapters on a range of China-India issues.


Swaraj: Dadabhai Naoroji and the Birth of Indian Nationalism

START
Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 10:00am

9:00–10:00 AM EST // 6:30–7:30 PM IST // 6:00–7:00 PM PKT // 7:00–8:00 PM BST

Venue: Virtual via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/91387696938 

This event will also be streamed LIVE on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mittalinstitute.newdelhi/ 

Moderator

  • Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History, Harvard University

Speaker

  • Dinyar Patel, Assistant Professor, S.P. Jain Institute of Management and Research

In 1906, Dadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917) declared swaraj, or Indian self-government, as the goal of the Indian National Congress. This talk will examine how Naoroji developed the idea of swaraj during his five decades-long political and nationalist career, which included groundbreaking economic research on Indian poverty, engagement with emancipatory movements around the world, and becoming the first-ever Asian elected to the British Parliament. Naoroji’s swaraj, as we will see, was global in nature. It evolved from contact with European liberalism and socialism and, at the same time, had a significant influence on the growth of global anti-colonialism and antiracism.


Breaking the Mould: Girl Power and Beyond in Contemporary India

START
Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 03:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 06:00pm

Jacqueline Bhabha (Professor, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health) will be in conversation with Neha J Hiranandani to discuss her book Girl Power: Indian Women Who Broke the Rules. The discussion will focus on the challenges young women still face when it comes to access to education and health while negotiating with the societal expectations. Keeping in with the theme of Neha Hiranandani’s Girl Power – a book about bringing forth the stories of ‘rebel women’ in India – it will ponder on the factors that contribute to the success of many who do break the mould, against the odds.


Until the Lions: Echoes from the Mahabharata Book Talk

START
Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Speaker: Karthika Naïr, Author and Poet

Moderator: Parimal Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Harvard University

In Until the Lions, Karthika Naïr retells the Mahabharata through the embodied voices of women and marginal characters, so often conquered and destroyed throughout history. She captures the richness and complexity of the Mahabharata, while illuminating lives buried beneath the edifices of one of the world’s most venerated books — revealing the most intimate threads of desire, greed, and sacrifice.


The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century

START
Fri, Nov 15, 2019 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 15, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Speaker: Thant Myint-U, Writer, Historian, and Founder and Chairman of the Yangon Heritage Trust

Copies of Thant Myint-U’s recent book, “The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century” will be available to purchase.

This event is co-sponsored with the Harvard University Asia Center.


Delusional States: Feeling Rule and Development in Pakistan’s Northern Frontier

START
Fri, Oct 25, 2019 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 25, 2019 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Delusional States is the first in-depth study of state-making and social change in Gilgit-Baltistan, a Shia-majority region of Sunni-dominated Pakistan and a contested border area that forms part of disputed Kashmir. Ali will discuss how Gilgit-Baltistan’s image within Pakistan as an idyllic paradise overlooks how the region is governed as a suspect security zone and dispossessed through multiple processes of state-making, including representation, militarization, and sectarianized education.

Speakers:

Nosheen Ali, Karti Dharti, Institute for Ecological Studies, Pakistan

Ali Asani, Harvard University, will moderate the discussion


Book Talk: Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia

START
Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Dr. Shenila Khoja-Moolji is Assistant Professor of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at Bowdoin College. Her work examines the interplay of gender, race, religion, and power in transnational contexts, particularly in relation to Muslim populations.

Dr. Khoja-Moolji is the author of Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia. She combines historical and cultural analyses with ethnography to examine the meaning of the “educated girl” figure in colonial India and postcolonial Pakistan. Through her work, she has deepened the scholarship on the evolving politics of educational reform and development campaigns. Dr. Khoja-Moolji argues that advocacy for women’s and girl’s education is not simply about access, but more concerned with producing ideal Muslim women and girls with specific relationships to patriarchy, paid work, Islam, and the nation-state. As such, the discourse on girl’s and women’s education also encompasses issues in class relations, religion, and the nation.

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University


Book Talk: The Future Is Asian

START
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Parag Khanna, Managing Partner of FutureMap, will discuss his new book entitled “The Future Is Asian,” in a talk chaired by Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at Harvard Business School and Director of The Mittal Institute. 
 
This event is co-sponsored with the Harvard University Asia Center.
 
About the book:
 
“The ‘Asian Century‘ is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia—linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. From investment portfolios and trade wars to Hollywood movies and holiday travels, no aspect of life is immune from Asianization.
 
“Dr. Parag Khanna’s latest book, “The Future Is Asian,” presents this irrepressible global Asianization through detailed analysis, data and maps of Asia’s major markets and their combined impact on global economy, society and governance. With his trademark conceptual clarity and on-the-ground reportage, Khanna provides essential guidance for executives as they look to hedge their China exposure and capture the next big commercial opportunities across Asia from real estate and retail to finance and technology, and attract Asian capital and talent into their operations at home and abroad. With his intimate knowledge of Asian history and geopolitics, he also paints a compelling vision of a balanced global system of shared responsibilities across America, Europe and Asia.” (Parag Khanna, 2019)