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SAI Event Type : Book Talk


Book Talk: The Future Is Asian

START
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Parag Khanna, Managing Partner of FutureMap, will discuss his new book entitled “The Future Is Asian,” in a talk chaired by Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at Harvard Business School and Director of The Mittal Institute. 
 
This event is co-sponsored with the Harvard University Asia Center.
 
About the book:
 
“The ‘Asian Century‘ is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia—linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. From investment portfolios and trade wars to Hollywood movies and holiday travels, no aspect of life is immune from Asianization.
 
“Dr. Parag Khanna’s latest book, “The Future Is Asian,” presents this irrepressible global Asianization through detailed analysis, data and maps of Asia’s major markets and their combined impact on global economy, society and governance. With his trademark conceptual clarity and on-the-ground reportage, Khanna provides essential guidance for executives as they look to hedge their China exposure and capture the next big commercial opportunities across Asia from real estate and retail to finance and technology, and attract Asian capital and talent into their operations at home and abroad. With his intimate knowledge of Asian history and geopolitics, he also paints a compelling vision of a balanced global system of shared responsibilities across America, Europe and Asia.” (Parag Khanna, 2019)
 

India-Pakistan Crises: Risks, Opportunities, and Options for US Crisis Management

START
Thu, Oct 4, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Thu, Oct 4, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Dr. Moeed Yusuf will present his research on US role in India-Pakistan crisis management, captured in his latest book Brokering Peace in Nuclear Environments: U.S. Crisis Management in South Asia. The book proposes an original theory to study regional nuclear crises and specifically US role in crisis management.


Book Talk | Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries

START
Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 07:30pm

COST   Free

Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School on his new book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries in conversation with Caroline Elkins, Professor of History and African and African American Studies, Harvard University


Book Launch | Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India

START
Mon, Sep 24, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Sep 24, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Benjamin Siegel, an assistant professor of History at Boston University and a former fellow at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, will discuss his new book “Hungry Nation: Food Famine, and the making of Modern India”, alongside commentators Prakash Humar, an associate professor of History and Asian Studies at Penn State University, and Rachel Berger, and associate professor of History at Concordia University.

About the Book:

This ambitious new account details independent India’s struggle to overcome famine and malnutrition in the twentieth century. Siegel explains the historical origins of contemporary India’s malnutrition epidemic, showing how food and sustenance moved to the center of nationalist thought in the final years of colonial rule. Hungry Nation interrogates how citizens and politicians contested the meanings of nation building and citizenship through food, and how these contestations receded in the wake of the Green Revolution. This is the story of how Indians challenged meanings of welfare and citizenship across class, caste, region, and gender in a new nation-state.

 

Sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University


Book Talk | Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries with Tarun Khanna

START
Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 03:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 04:15pm

COST   Free

VENUE
Harvard Book Store

ADDRESS
Harvard Book Store
1256 Mass Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and Harvard Book Store welcome TARUN KHANNA—the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School—for a discussion of his latest book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries.

About Trust

Entrepreneurial ventures often fail in the developing world because of the lack of something taken for granted in the developed world: trust. Over centuries, the developed world has built customs and institutions such as enforceable contracts, an impartial legal system, and credible regulatory bodies—and even unofficial but respected sources of information such as Yelp and Consumer Reports—that have created a high level of what scholar and entrepreneur Tarun Khanna calls “ambient trust.”

This is not the case in the developing world. But Khanna shows that rather than become casualties of mistrust, smart entrepreneurs can adopt the mindset that, like it or not, it’s up to them to weave their own independent web of trust—with their employees, their partners, their clients, their customers, and society as a whole. This can be challenging, and it requires innovative approaches in places where the level of societal mistrust is so high that an official certification of quality simply arouses suspicion—and lowers sales! Using vivid examples from Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and elsewhere, Khanna’s stories show how entrepreneurs can build on existing customs and practices instead of trying to push against them. He highlights the role new technologies can play (but cautions that these are not panaceas) and explains how entrepreneurs can find dependable partners in national and local governments to create impact at scale.

As far back as the 18th century, Adam Smith recognized trust as what Khanna calls “the hidden engine of economic progress.” “Frankness and openness conciliate confidence,” Smith wrote. “We trust the man who seems willing to trust us.” That kind of confidence is critical to entrepreneurial success, but in the developing world, entrepreneurs have to establish it through their own efforts. As Khanna puts it, “The entrepreneur must not just create, she must create the conditions to create.”


Fireside Chat with Tarun Khanna & Manish Sabharwal

START
Mon, Aug 27, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Mon, Aug 27, 2018 at 07:30pm

Join the Harvard Business School India Research Centre and the HBS Club of India for a Fireside Chat with Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, HBS, and Manish Sabharwal, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman, TeamLease for a conversation about Prof. Khanna’s recent book, Trust: Creating the Foundations for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries.

 

Agenda

5:30-6:00 PM Registration, Tea & Networking

6:00-7:00 PM Fireside Chat

7:00-7:30 PM Q & A

 

Please RSVP here

 

Location:

Microsoft Research
9, Vigyan, Lavelle Road, Ashok Nagar
Bengaluru, Karnataka 560001


Cleaning Up India? Obstacles and Assets

START
Mon, Mar 19, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Mar 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Assa Doron, Australian National University
Robin Jeffrey, Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore
Chair: Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Waste of a Nation: Garbage and Growth in India (Harvard UP, 2018) examines national assets and obstacles for achieving a cleaner India. The authors argue that obstacles that appear unique to India are volume, density, and the caste system. The authors will also discuss India’s assets, including old practices of frugality; recycling; global experience and science; and dynamic entrepreneurs, officials, NGOs, and citizens.

 

 

 


Unravelling the Kashmir Knot

START
Mon, Nov 6, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 6, 2017 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

“Unravelling the Kashmir Knot” delves into the questions entangled in the Kashmir issue: Do the rules that created Pakistan make Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) a part of India? Is the routing of the China-Pakistan economic corridor through J&K legal? How did J&K become a “disputed territory”?


Book Talk: The Indian Legal Profession in the Age of Globalization

START
Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 28, 2017

VENUE
Harvard Law School

ADDRESS
Harvard Law School
1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138


VENUE
WCC 2036 Milstein East A/B

The Indian Legal Profession in the Age of Globalization: The Rise of the Corporate Legal Sector and its Impact on Lawyers and Society

A Harvard Law School Library Book Talk

Speakers:
David B. Wilkins, Lester Kissel Professor of Law, Faculty Director of the Center on the Legal Profession, Vice Dean for Global Initiatives on the Legal Profession, Harvard Law School

Vikramaditya S. Khanna, William W. Cook Professor of Law, University of Michigan School of Law School

Commentator:
Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Co-sponsored with the Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession and the Harvard University South Asia Institute.


Book Talk: India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971

START
Fri, Sep 22, 2017 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Sep 22, 2017

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

A book talk on India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971
Dr. Arjun Subramaniam, Asia Center Fellow; former Faculty Member, National Defence College, New Delhi; retired Air Vice Marshal, Indian Air Force

Chair/Discussant: Professor Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

An Asia Center Fellows Seminar; co-sponsored by the South Asia Institute, Harvard University


An Evening with Rana Dasgupta

START
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 09:00pm

Cosponsored Event

A public reading and discussion with British-Indian author Rana Dasgupta. Rana is a novelist and essayist, and the winner of the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for his novel Solo. He currently lives in Delhi and his nonfiction book Capital constructs an intimate oral history to unfold the possibilities and catastrophes of the city’s elite class. Rana is in the United States to lecture this month at Brown University.

No RSVP required. Refreshments will be served.

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/420864254936925/

Sponsored by the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard South Asia Institute


Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia

START
Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
WCC 2009, Harvard Law School

ADDRESS
WCC 2009, Harvard Law School
1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA

Book Talk

Mark TushnetWilliam Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Rohit De, Associate Research Scholar in Law, Yale

Nick Robinson, Resident Fellow, Center on the Legal Profession

Cosponsored with Harvard Law School

Although the field of constitutional law has become increasingly comparative in recent years, its geographic focus has remained limited. South Asia, despite being the site of the world’s largest democracy and a vibrant if turbulent constitutionalism, is one of the important neglected regions within the field. This book remedies this lack of attention by providing a detailed examination of constitutional law and practice in five South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Identifying a common theme of volatile change, it develops the concept of “unstable constitutionalism,” studying the sources of instability alongside reactions and responses to it. By highlighting unique theoretical and practical questions in an underrepresented region, Unstable Constitutionalism constitutes an important step toward truly global constitutional scholarship.