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SAI Event Type : Seminars


Fri, April 12, 2019 at 02:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

De Facto Suffrage: A Field Experiment to Improve Women’s Turnout in Pakistan’s General Elections

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Sarah Khan, Postgraduate Associate, Yale MacMillan Center

Sarah Khan is a postgraduate associate at the Yale MacMillan Center. Her research interests lie at the intersection of gender and comparative politics, with a regional specialization in South Asia. In her work, she explores gender gaps in political preferences, and the barriers to women’s participation and substantive representation in Pakistan. Additionally, she explores questions related to the prevention of violence against women. Her research has been generously supported by grants from the American Institute of Pakistan Studies, the Abdul Jameel Poverty Action Lab (JPAL) Governance Initiative, and the National Science Foundation.

Khan has worked with Ali Cheema, Shandana Mohmand, and Asad Liaqat to research potential pathways to increasing women’s voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, culminating in a paper entitled “Exercising Her Right: Civic and Political Action as Pathways for Increasing Women’s Turnout in Pakistan.” According to the team, “there is a large and persistent gender gap in voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, making for a heavily male-skewed electorate in all levels of Pakistani elections. This has implications both for the quality of democracy, and for women’s substantive representation in politics.”

START
Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 12, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Fri, February 8, 2019 at 02:00pm  /  CGIS South, S450

Crisis and Credibility: The Politics of Ideas in India and Developing Democracies

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Dr. Bilal A. Baloch is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science & Economics and a Lecturer and Regional Director in South Asia, Middle East and North Africa at The Joseph H. Lauder Institute, Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania.

At CASI, Bilal focuses on the political economy of government behavior in India and other developing democracies. Here, he is revising his doctoral dissertation, Crisis, Credibility, and Corruption: How Ideas and Institutions Shape Government Behavior in India, into a monograph. Bilal has presented academic papers at several international conferences, including the annual meetings of the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. In addition to his scholarly publications, his commentary has appeared in a number of outlets, including: The Guardian, Foreign Policy, The Washington Post, and The Hindu. (Source)

In this lecture, Bilal will go beyond the claim that ideas matter in Indian politics, and will identify which set of ideas, as well as how these ideas shape political behavior during a credibility crisis. He will examine two main credibility crisis moments in contemporary Indian history: that which led to the declaration of an internal emergency and suspension of civil liberties by the ruling Congress government in 1974-1975; and the crisis milieu which led to policy paralysis within the UPA government in 2011-2012. This argument draws upon over 120 interviews with state elites, including prime ministers, cabinet ministers, party leaders, senior bureaucrats, and others.

START
Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 8, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S450

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Wed, January 23, 2019 from 03:00pm - 05:00pm  /  Auditorium of National Institute of Plant Genome Research

Preparing Young Indian Scientists for Life Sciences in the 21st Century

The landscape of life sciences — biology, biomedicine, biotech, and all the rest — is rapidly changing. Today, the amount of data produced is massive, and it increases exponentially with time. New techniques are invented every week as existing techniques get cheaper, though there are new ethical and moral concerns about playing with life processes. Physical and mathematical sciences are increasingly integrated into the life sciences, and exciting new career options are developing as academic positions get more competitive.

Life science research is at the heart of nearly every economic sector. But how do budding life scientists navigate all of these issues, and what can they do to prepare for the future? In this panel discussion, a group of distinguished life scientists and policymakers will discuss some of these issues and offer their guidance.

Please RSVP: mittalinstitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu

Tue, November 27, 2018 from 06:00pm - 08:30pm  /  India International Centre  /  Kamala Devi Complex

Meritocracy: Perspectives from China Past and Present

Speaker: PROF. MICHAEL SZONYI
Frank Wen-hsiung Wu Memorial Professor of Chinese History and Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University

Moderator: PROF. TARUN KHANNA
Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School and Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

How should societies identify and promote merit?  Enabling all people to fulfill their full potential and ensuring that competent and capable leaders are selected to govern are central challenges for any society. Failure to meet these challenges can have enormous costs, for individuals and for societies as a whole.  The richness of China’s historical experience and its distinctive current practices offer useful tools for reflection and comparative analysis.  Does the case of China offer any lessons – positive or negative – for India to consider?

 

START
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 08:30pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India


VENUE
Kamala Devi Complex

Fri, November 16, 2018 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Transcultural Attractions: American Photographs of an Indian Dancer

AJAY SINHA, Professor of Art History, Mount Holyoke College

Chair: JINAH KIM, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture and Faculty Director, Arts @ Mittal Institute

 

In the Spring of 1938, an Indian dancer, Ram Gopal, posed in a variety of fantastical costumes for the American photographer, Carl Van Vechten, in New York City. Studying over 100 large-size photographs resulting from the photoshoot, the lecture builds an illustrated story of their mutual fascination and exchange, triggered by the camera. The remarkable images, now part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, Yale University, show traces of the myriad, transcultural relations being performed during the photoshoot. They reveal an interplay of differing investments in the image when we ask:  What does the Indian dancer show the camera;  what does the American photographer see through his lens?  Their visual exploration helps us elaborate on an underrepresented history of exchanges between the cultural worlds of India and the U.S. in early-20th century.

START
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Fri, November 2, 2018 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

Join Vijayendra Rao in a seminar discussing his paper “Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Analysis of Indian Village Assemblies” (Co-authored with R. Parthasarathy and N. Palaniswamy).

Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, a Lead Economist in the Research Department of the World Bank, integrates his training in economics with theories and methods from anthropology, sociology and political science to study the social, cultural, and political context of extreme poverty in developing countries.

He leads the Social Observatory, an inter-disciplinary effort to improve the conversation between citizens and governments. It does this – first – by improving the quality of civic action by strengthening forums for deliberation and developing tools to facilitate collective action, and – second – by building the “adaptive capacity” of large-scale anti-poverty projects;  i.e. the ability of projects to make everyday decisions, and modify project design, on the basis of high-quality descriptive, evaluative and process-oriented information.

His research has spanned a wide variety of subjects including participatory development, deliberative democracy, the rise in dowries in India, the determinants and consequences of domestic violence, the economics of sex work, public celebrations, and culture and development policy.

 

The paper he will be discussing during this seminar can be accessed here

START
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Tue, October 30, 2018 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S030

In Focus

A panel discussion on capturing identity, everyday life and activism in South Asia through the digital lens.

 

PANELISTS

AMAN KALEEM and SAMSUL ALAM HELAM

Mittal Institute 2018-19 Visiting Artist Fellows

Chair: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture

START
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 05:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138