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SAI Event Type : Seminars


Representation from Below: How Women Mobilize in India’s Weak Party System

START
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Tanushree Goyal is a fourth and final year PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. Goyal is also an academy scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Harvard University. Starting in Fall 2022, she will join Princeton University as an Assistant Professor in Politics and International Affairs. Her research interests lie at the intersections of comparative politics, gender, and development with a regional focus in South Asia. Goyal’s dissertation uses natural, survey, and quasi-experiments to examine important questions in the field of representation and accountability and is set in the context of the World’s largest democracy: India. It shows how female politicians affect change by influencing intra-party politics in the context of India’s urban cities. Female politicians incorporate women as intermediaries and establish cross-electoral level networks to influence political campaigns and party decisions. This “representation from below” fundamentally alters party politics and democracy for good.


Policing and Gendered Cases in India

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Nirvikar Jassal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on gender, sexual violence, ethnic conflict and hate crime, and policing with a regional focus on South Asia. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Asian Survey and Journal of Asian Studies. He completed his PhD from the University of California—Berkeley in 2020, and previously worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and New York City government.


Capacity Beyond Coercion: Regulatory Pragmatism and Compliance Along the India-Nepal Border

START
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Susan L. Ostermann is Assistant Professor of Global Affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She completed her Ph.D. in the Travers Department of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She also holds a law degree from Stanford Law School and worked for several years as a practicing litigator, focusing on class actions and intellectual property disputes.

Employing both quantitative and qualitative methodology, Ostermann seeks to understand why we sometimes see compliance with regulations in very unlikely places: those in which the state is weak and actors, be they individuals or organizations, have strong incentives to break the law. Her dissertation develops the concept of regulatory pragmatism to explain variation in strategies used by both the Nepali and Indian states to secure compliance with conservation, education and child labor regulations under challenging conditions.

While Professor Ostermann’s research focuses mainly on regulatory compliance in South Asia, she is broadly interested in understanding norms and how they change. Towards this end, she has published papers on inter-caste marriage and the role of skin color in Indian politics. Her current projects are designed to explore the historical roots of conservatism in Indian political thought, the development and expansion of the Indian Election Commission, and variation in sex-ratios throughout the subcontinent. She has also published work on the Indian bureaucracy, state capacity in South Asia, and the 2014 Indian general election.

Ostermann’s work has been published in Asian Survey, Studies in Comparative International Development, the Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, Studies in Indian Politics and Law & Policy.


Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.


Reimagining India’s Health System: The Lancet Citizens’ Commission at Harvard

START
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 10:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/98490180275
Stream via YouTube: https://youtu.be/xJoNzXrky6k

9:00 AM–10:15 AM ET // 7:30–8:45 PM IST

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral initiative to lay out the path to universal health coverage in India. Its guiding principle is that structural change toward universal health coverage can only be achieved through consultative and participatory engagement with the diverse sectors involved in healthcare and, most importantly, with India’s citizenry.

This event aims to introduce the Commission to the Harvard community and invite students, researchers, faculty, and alumni to participate in the initiative. It will consist of a panel discussion featuring several of the Commission’s co-chairs and commissioners, who are leading voices from across India’s healthcare landscape. They will discuss the Commission’s five work streams (citizens’ engagement, financing, governance, human resources, and technology) and ways to get involved.

Those interested in participating in the Commission are encouraged to fill out this survey. For more on the Commission, please read the launch commentary in the Lancet and visit the Commission website.

Moderator
  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University
Panelists
  • Yamini Aiyar, President and Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research
  • Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson, Biocon Ltd.
  • Poonam Muttreja, Executive Director, Population Foundation of India
  • Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School; Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Co-founder, Sangath
  • Sharad Sharma, Co-founder, iSPIRT Foundation
  • S.V. Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard University
  • Rajani Ved, Former Executive Director, National Health Systems Resource Centre

This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Club of India, the Harvard Club of Mumbai, the Harvard Business School Club of India, the Harvard Club of Bengaluru, The Harvard Business School India Research Center, and the Harvard T.H. Chan India Research Center.


Why Do Indians Shun Science?

START
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 08:00am

END
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

8:00 AM ET // 6:30 PM IST
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/imxGZh0NkCk
Add to Google Calendar: http://shorturl.at/dxyCR

It might be odd to aver that Indians shun science — in a country that is lauded as a fount of software engineering, has just touched the heavens with Mangalyaan, and will likely make most of the vaccines for the world.  But, the fact remains that India dramatically underinvests in science, to its detriment. Perhaps worse, we seem to eschew a scientific mindset to promote instead a variety of other modes of reasoning: parochial concerns, religious sentiment, and tradition.

While these have their place, in this talk Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of the Mittal Institute, will illustrate the costs of our apparent science-phobia by briefly discussing benefits of higher scientific literacy which we could tap into in three disparate Indian settings: the moribund market for jobs among youth, a polluted environment, and crumbling art and architectural heritage. To be clear, this is not a diatribe against the humanities and the social sciences, but rather it is an attempt to direct attention to a costly societal myopia. 

——————

Tarun Khanna is the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of Harvard University’s Lakshmi Mittal & Family South Asia Institute. For over 25 years, he has studied entrepreneurship as a means of economic development. He currently teaches courses related to creativity in emerging economies. An online version, Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, one of Harvard’s most popular, has been taken by ~600,000 students in over 200 countries. A recent book, Trust, and an earlier one, Billions of Entrepreneurs, chronicle creative ventures in China, India and beyond.

In 2007, he was nominated to be a Young Global Leader (under 40) by the World Economic Forum. In 2009, he was elected a Fellow of the Academy of International Business. In 2016, he was recognized by the Academy of Management as Eminent Scholar for Lifetime Achievement in the field of International Management. The Government of India appointed him to lead several national committees connected to entrepreneurship and higher education. In 2020, he was asked by The Lancet, the world’s leading medical journal, to co-chair a commission to re-imagine the future of India’s health system.

Outside Harvard, he serves on the boards of the Washington-based global power company, AES Corporation, the global adtech company and India’s first unicorn, InMobi, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, PRS India, a non-profit dedicated to India’s parliamentary governance, is a cofounder of Axilor, a Bangalore-based incubator, and of several ventures across the developing world.


Consequences: South and Southeast Asia and the 2020 U.S. Election

START
Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 01:00pm

VENUE
Webinar

Location: Online, via Zoom

Register to join the webinar herehttps://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_b-fBxaQxT96uKpkNd5LpfA

Panelists:

Mattias Fibiger, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Erik Kuhonta, Associate Professor of Political Science, McGill University

Doreen Lee, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Northeastern University; Visiting Scholar, Harvard University Asia Center

Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of International Studies and the Social Sciences; Professor of Political Science; Director; the Center for Contemporary South Asia, Brown University

Chair/Moderator: James Robson, James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations; Victor and William Fung Director, Harvard University Asia Center; Chair, Regional Studies East Asia, Harvard University

Asia Beyond the Headlines Seminar Series, Harvard University Asia Center; co-sponsored with the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute


Art and Science of Heritage Conservation: Finding the Right Balance, Part 2

START
Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 10:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92896152942
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/ekNo4vZwkLA

6:00–7:15 AM PT // 9:00 AM–10:15 AM ET // 7:00–8:15 PM PKT // 7:30–8:45 PM IST // 8:00–9:45 PM BST

This event is the second in a 2-part series. View Part 1 here.

As part of the Mittal Institute’s Program for Conservation of Culture, this webinar will focus on the status of art conservation science in South Asia today. The panelists will explore how to develop and carry out a leading art conservation science program in South Asia.

This event is co-hosted by the Mittal Institute and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, India. 

Moderator

  • Anupam Sah, Head of Art Conservation, Research, and Training, CSVMS, Mumbai

Speakers

  • Vinod Daniel, Board Member of International Council of Museums and Chairman of AusHeritage
  • Anusha Kasthuriarachchi, Department of Archaeology, Colombo
  • Jinah Kim, Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University
  • Bijaya Kumar Shahi, Founder Chairperson, ICOM, Nepal;
  • Manager Singh, Director General, National Research Laboratory for Conservation of Cultural Property, Lucknow
  • Sharada Srinivasan, Professor, School of Humanities, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru

To add this event to your iCalendar, click here: https://bit.ly/2UsQRCA

 


Art and Science of Heritage Conservation: Finding the Right Balance, Part 1

START
Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 11:00am

END
Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 12:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92896152942
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/sr9oSHiX62I

8:00–9:15 AM PT // 11:00 AM–12:15 PM ET // 9:00–10:15 PM PKT // 9:30–10:45 PM IST // 10:00–11:45 PM BST

This event is the first in a 2-part series. View Part 2 here.

As part of the Mittal Institute’s Program for Conservation of Culture, this webinar will focus on recent developments in science and the impact of these developments on the field of art conservation. It will also delve into the current understanding about materials and techniques in the conservation of antiquities. 

This event is co-hosted by the Mittal Institute and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, India. 

Moderator

Panelists

  • Alison Heritage, Project Manager, Strategic Planning and Research, International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), Rome
  • Narayan Khandekar, Director, Straus Conservation Center, Harvard Art Museums
  • Austin Nevin, Head of Department of Conservation, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • Stefan Simon, Director, Rathgen Research Laboratory, Staatliche Museen, Berlin

To add this event to your iCalendar, click here: https://bit.ly/2UsQRCA

 


The US Election’s Impact on South Asia

START
Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 02:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 03:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/99466323023
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/V_OIBk8x9uo

Ronak Desai, Research Associate at the Mittal Institute, will moderate a discussion between Nirupama Rao, Former Foreign Secretary of India, and Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT, as they explore how the potential outcomes of the US presidential election may impact the region of South Asia.

 

Moderator
  • Ronak Desai, Associate, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute
Speakers
  • Nirupama Rao, Former Foreign Secretary, India
  • Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Webinar: The Labor of Fashion, the Global COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of Resistance in Bangladesh

START
Fri, Jun 12, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Jun 12, 2020 at 10:30am

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

9:00–10:30 AM EST // 6:00–7:30 PM PKT // 6:30–8:00 PM IST // 7:00–8:30 PM BST

Virtual via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/99118872916
Stream via YouTube Live: https://youtu.be/JgegRQEm1UY

Moderators

  • Dr. Elora Chowdhury, Professor, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • Dr. Durba Mitra, Assistant Professor, Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Harvard University

Speakers

  • Taslima Akhter, Photographer and Organizer, Bangladesh Garments Sramik Shanghati
  • Barrister Jyotirmoy Barua, Advocate, Supreme Court of Bangladesh
  • Dr. Seuty Sabur, Associate Professor, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, BRAC University, Bangladesh
  • Dr. Dina M. Siddiqi, Clinical Associate Professor, Liberal Studies, New York University
  • Dr. Nafisa Tanjeem, Assistant Professor, Global Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Lesley University

The global apparel industry is currently facing an unprecedented crisis resulting from the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Major fashion retailers in the Global North are closing their stores and laying off workers. The same brands that demonstrated strong public commitment for protecting the safety and security of Bangladeshi garment workers after the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013 are not hesitating to cancel or suspend orders or delay payments. Thousands of workers are currently out of work and facing a unique livelihood, as well as a health threat. 

Bangladeshi local labor rights organizers are urging the garment factory owners and the Bangladesh government to stop laying off workers, pay the unpaid salary, and enact health safety protocols at the workplace. On the other hand, Bangladeshi garment factory owners and international labor rights groups are exclusively targeting the global brands and asking them to take responsibility for the workers. What is missing in the local and global COVID-19 organizing initiatives is an understanding of how focusing exclusively on either the global brands or the local Bangladeshi actors – such as the government and the factory owners – creates an unfortunate disjuncture between local and global labor organizing priorities and fails to address global capitalism’s creative ways of feminizing and racializing garment workers’ bodies and labor across the supply chain.

By bringing together labor rights organizers and critical scholars, this webinar addresses: How can we move beyond the spotlight approach of focusing on one actor of the apparel supply chain at a time? How can we engage in dialogues and organizing across borders to simultaneously hold the global retailers, governments, and factory owners accountable for ensuring workers’ safety and wellbeing? What does a transnational resistance that is mindful of the power differences between labor organizers in the Global North and the Global South look like?


South Asia Youth Resilience Summit

START
Thu, Apr 16, 2020

END
Sat, Apr 18, 2020

More information here: https://bylc.org/resiliencesummit2020/

Facebook Live: facebook.com/youthleadershipcenter

South Asia, home to more than one-fourth of the world’s population, is set to be one of the hardest hit regions in the world by COVID-19, as the region endures prolonged lockdowns. The economic impact here is likely to be greater than the health impact, as countries in the region do not have the fiscal space or safety nets for flattening the curve by halting production and economic activity.

To facilitate a conversation on the adaptation that will be required to address the current crisis, Bangladesh Youth Leadership Center (BYLC) is organizing the South Asia Youth Resilience Summit 2020, on April 16-18, to be hosted live on Facebook. On each of the three days, we will have a moderated conversation with a global expert for an hour on how youth in South Asia can build resilience and navigate the complexities of present times caused by COVID-19. In addition, there will be panel discussions on each of the three days on issues ranging from youth leadership, entrepreneurial ecosystems in South Asia in a post-pandemic world to staying resilient in times of crisis.