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SAI Events Archive

“Practically No Habitation”: The Yanadi Community and the Colonial Violence of Spaceflight

START
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 01:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

SPEAKER: Asif Siddiqi, Professor of History, Fordham University

The Indian state’s broken pacts with Indigenous communities, the so-called ‘scheduled tribes’ or Adivasi, resulted in massive displacements in the name of environmental, territorial, and infrastructural sovereignty, yet none have given rise to such troubling paradoxes as those implemented to build rocket launch sites. To make way for a new space center in Andhra Pradesh, in 1970, the government of India forcibly removed and resettled a large population of Yanadi people. More than fifty years later, the profound and permanent disruptions caused by this dislocation continue to reverberate in the deep social and economic precarity of the Yanadi. I recover this story as a starting point to highlight two broader intersecting frames. The first positions India’s emergent technoscientific projects in the decades after independence as reproducing certain forms of violence redolent of colonial science. The second finds echoes of such violence in infrastructural entanglements across the world in places like Algeria, Kenya, California, Kazakhstan, the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and elsewhere. I argue that the violence of displacement, dislocation, and damage, accompanied by local resistance, were not appendices to the long history of spaceflight but fundamental to it, as space activities unfolded through deeply colonial-minded practices. Moreover, I argue that such initiatives functioned squarely within the modernist aspirations of individual states, the international scientific community, and often, ordinary people, activated by the desires and promise that space exploration invoked.

Asif Siddiqi is Professor of History at Fordham University, where he works on the global history of science and technology in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Science and Technology in Asia Seminar Series is sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and convened by Victor Seow, Assistant Professor of History of Science.

B4 Webinar: Building Bharat Boston Biosciences

START
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:00am

VENUE
Webinar

SESSION I: NEUROSCIENCE AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE – AN ONGOING DIALOGUE
9:00 – 9:45 am EST // 6:30 – 7:15 pm IST

OPENING REMARKS: 

  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: 

  • Venkatesh Murthy, Raymond Leo Erikson Life Sciences Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology; Director Center for Brain Science, Harvard University

Q&A moderated by Professor Tarun Khanna

SESSION II: THE B4 PROGRAM: A TEMPLATE FOR FUTURE US – INDIA, PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS
9:50 – 11:00 am EST // 7:20 – 8:30 pm IST (Panel discussion + Q&A)

PANELISTS:

  • Philippe Cluzel, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Harvard University
  • Parvathi Sreekumar, B4 Fellow’17; Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Physiology, College of Horticulture, Vellanikkara, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur, Kerala, India
  • Ramya Purkanti, B4 Fellow ’17; Post-doctoral Fellow with Dr. Nadine Vastenhouw, The Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
  • Ajay Labade, B4 Fellow ’21; Postdoctoral Fellow, Buenrostro Lab, Harvard University

Discussion moderated by Professor Venkatesh Murthy

The Building Bharat Boston Biosciences (B4) Program is a collaboration between The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University, Harvard Global Research Support Centre India, IBAB, and IISER, and funded by the Department of Biotechnology, Govt. of India.

Capacity Beyond Coercion: Regulatory Pragmatism and Compliance Along the India-Nepal Border

START
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Susan L. Ostermann is Assistant Professor of Global Affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She completed her Ph.D. in the Travers Department of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She also holds a law degree from Stanford Law School and worked for several years as a practicing litigator, focusing on class actions and intellectual property disputes.

Employing both quantitative and qualitative methodology, Ostermann seeks to understand why we sometimes see compliance with regulations in very unlikely places: those in which the state is weak and actors, be they individuals or organizations, have strong incentives to break the law. Her dissertation develops the concept of regulatory pragmatism to explain variation in strategies used by both the Nepali and Indian states to secure compliance with conservation, education and child labor regulations under challenging conditions.

While Professor Ostermann’s research focuses mainly on regulatory compliance in South Asia, she is broadly interested in understanding norms and how they change. Towards this end, she has published papers on inter-caste marriage and the role of skin color in Indian politics. Her current projects are designed to explore the historical roots of conservatism in Indian political thought, the development and expansion of the Indian Election Commission, and variation in sex-ratios throughout the subcontinent. She has also published work on the Indian bureaucracy, state capacity in South Asia, and the 2014 Indian general election.

Ostermann’s work has been published in Asian Survey, Studies in Comparative International Development, the Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, Studies in Indian Politics and Law & Policy.

A Strong Handoff in U.S.-India Relations

START
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 10:30am

END
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 11:45am

VENUE
Webinar

Register here for the talk. 

Please join the Future of Diplomacy Project for a conversation with Kenneth I. Juster, former U.S. Ambassador to India and HKS alumnus, about the U.S.-India relationship.

Ambassador Juster will discuss major achievements in the U.S.-India partnership in the areas of diplomacy, defense, economic relations, energy, and health over the past four years as well as issues on the horizon such as the rise of China and trade policy. Dean of Harvard Kennedy School, Doug Elmendorf, will introduce Ambassador Juster, and Faculty Chair, Nicholas Burns will moderate this discussion.

Please register in advance for this meeting here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Visit the Future of Diplomacy Project website for full event details. 

Identifying Core Values in Research and Leadership: An Open Conversation with Professor Kristin Fabbe and Dr. Rana el Kaliouby

START
Mon, Mar 15, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 15, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Professor Kristin Fabbe of the Harvard Business School, and Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, CEO and co-founder of Affectiva, will engage prospective Crossroads Emerging Leaders Program students in an open session on identifying core values as the foundation for effective leadership.

 

Bangladesh at 50: Looking Back, Looking Forward

START
Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 07:00am

END
Thu, Mar 4, 2021 at 11:00am

VENUE
Webinar

Wednesday, March 3, 2021: 7:00 AM EST – 11:00 AM EST // 6:00 PM BST – 10:00 PM BST 
Thursday, March 4, 2021: 7:00 AM EST – 11:00 AM EST // 6:00 PM BST – 10:00 PM BST
Register here to receive the Zoom link to both days of the conference.
Livestream Day 1 (Wednesday, March 3) on YouTube
Livestream Day 2 (Thursday, March 4) on YouTube

Bangladesh gained independence from Pakistan in 1971. To mark 50 years of Bangladesh’s independence, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University is holding virtual conference on March 3 and 4, 2021. The conference will highlight the arc of Bangladesh’s history from the Language Movement through the Liberation War to the present – and the future.

Panelists will discuss a wide range of topics, including the remarkable economic and human development of independent Bangladesh and the important role of civil society in its development. This arc will be traced and analyzed through a set of panel presentations by leading Bangladeshi scholars and activists moderated by international scholars who have worked on and in Bangladesh.  

 

To view the agenda for both days and the panelists who will be speaking at the event, click here.

Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

START
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 05:00pm

VENUE
Webinar

Registration required for this event: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ANpdh_VUTvKvpvWk4AbGGA

Speaker: Andrew B. Liu, Assistant Professor of History, Villanova University

Tea remains the world’s most popular commercial drink today, and at the turn of the twentieth century, it represented the largest export industry of both China and colonial India. In analyzing the global competition between Chinese and Indian tea, Andrew B. Liu challenges past economic histories premised on the technical “divergence” between the West and the Rest, arguing instead that seemingly traditional technologies and practices were central to modern capital accumulation across Asia. He shows how competitive pressures compelled Chinese merchants to adopt abstract industrial conceptions of time, while colonial planters in India pushed for labor indenture laws to support factory-style tea plantations. Characterizations of China and India as premodern backwaters, he explains, were themselves the historical result of new notions of political economy adopted by Chinese and Indian nationalists, who discovered that these abstract ideas corresponded to concrete social changes in their local surroundings. Together, these stories point toward a more flexible and globally oriented conceptualization of the history of capitalism in China and India.

Andrew B. Liu is assistant professor of history at Villanova University, where his research focuses on China, transnational Asia, political economy, and comparative history.

This event is hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by The Mittal Institute and The Joint Center for History and Economics, Harvard University.

Policing and Gendered Cases in India

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Nirvikar Jassal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on gender, sexual violence, ethnic conflict and hate crime, and policing with a regional focus on South Asia. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Asian Survey and Journal of Asian Studies. He completed his PhD from the University of California—Berkeley in 2020, and previously worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and New York City government.

Reimagining India’s Health System: The Lancet Citizens’ Commission at Harvard

START
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 10:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/98490180275
Stream via YouTube: https://youtu.be/xJoNzXrky6k

9:00 AM–10:15 AM ET // 7:30–8:45 PM IST

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral initiative to lay out the path to universal health coverage in India. Its guiding principle is that structural change toward universal health coverage can only be achieved through consultative and participatory engagement with the diverse sectors involved in healthcare and, most importantly, with India’s citizenry.

This event aims to introduce the Commission to the Harvard community and invite students, researchers, faculty, and alumni to participate in the initiative. It will consist of a panel discussion featuring several of the Commission’s co-chairs and commissioners, who are leading voices from across India’s healthcare landscape. They will discuss the Commission’s five work streams (citizens’ engagement, financing, governance, human resources, and technology) and ways to get involved.

Those interested in participating in the Commission are encouraged to fill out this survey. For more on the Commission, please read the launch commentary in the Lancet and visit the Commission website.

Moderator
  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University
Panelists
  • Yamini Aiyar, President and Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research
  • Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson, Biocon Ltd.
  • Poonam Muttreja, Executive Director, Population Foundation of India
  • Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School; Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Co-founder, Sangath
  • Sharad Sharma, Co-founder, iSPIRT Foundation
  • S.V. Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard University
  • Rajani Ved, Former Executive Director, National Health Systems Resource Centre

This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Club of India, the Harvard Club of Mumbai, the Harvard Business School Club of India, the Harvard Club of Bengaluru, The Harvard Business School India Research Center, and the Harvard T.H. Chan India Research Center.

Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.