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SAI Event Topic : Special Event

Is decentralization good for development? Perspectives from academics & policy makers

START
Fri, Feb 12, 2016 at 11:45am

END
Fri, Feb 12, 2016 at 01:00pm

VENUE
Perkins Room, Rubenstein Building, Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
Perkins Room
Rubenstein Building
Harvard Kennedy School
79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

Jean-Paul Faguet, Professor of the Political Economy of Development, London School of Economics

Cosponsored with the Center for International Development

 


Megacities Asia

START
Thu, Mar 24, 2016 at 05:30pm

END
Thu, Mar 24, 2016 at 08:30pm

VENUE
Auditorium, Arthur M. Sackler Building

ADDRESS
Auditorium, Arthur M. Sackler Building
485 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 0213

Special Event

In collaboration with the upcoming “Megacities Asia” exhibition on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, from April 3 to July 17, 2016, this event will bring together artists and academics to examine contemporary Asian megacities including Beijing, Delhi, Mumbai, Shanghai, and Tokyo. Discussions will focus on the built environment in these cities, how we think about concepts of modern versus vernacular, formal versus informal, and the impact  of rapid urbanization on inhabitants of cities from Mumbai to Shanghai.

Sponsored by the Harvard South Asia Institute and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Cosponsored by Harvard’s Asia Center, Department of Art and Architecture, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Korea Institute, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

 

5:30 – 6 pm      Megacities Asia

Introduction: Tarun KhannaDirector, Harvard South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Al Miner, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Laura Weinstein, Ananda Coomaraswamy Curator of South Asian and Islamic Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

With towering masses of stainless steel vessels, vast quantities of colorful plastic wares, crowded arrangements of discarded architectural elements, and other such accumulations, artists in Megacities Asia including Seoul, Beijing, Shanghai, Delhi, and Mumbai are creating work that reflects the unprecedented wave of urbanization that has swept the region over the last fifty years.

6 – 7 pm           Modern – Vernacular, City – Nature: Imaginations of the New India

Anu Ramaswami, Charles M. Denny, Jr., Chair of Science, Technology, and Public Policy, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota; Professor, College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Sciences, University of Minnesota

Chitra Venkataramani, South Asian Studies Fellow, Harvard South Asia Institute

Asim Waqif, Artist and Architect

Chair: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Responding to the examples in the Megacities Asia exhibit, this conversation will focus on the politics and pluralities of architecture and urban planning in Delhi and Mumbai

 

7 – 7:15 pm     Break

7:15 – 8:30 pm Inhabiting Asian Cities

Theodore C. Bestor, Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology, Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University

Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, Affiliated Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, International Coordinator of the global research-policy-action network Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO)

Hu Xiangcheng, Artist

Chair: Laura WeinsteinAnanda Coomaraswamy Curator of South Asian and Islamic Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

This panel will explore the dynamism of urban life in Asia, both its material and immaterial aspects, in comparative perspective. Panelists will discuss urban planning in relation to the lives and livelihoods of city dwellers in South Asia, China, and Japan

 


The Scope of Spatial Data and Technology for Building Resilience of Vulnerable Groups: A Case of 2015 Nepal Earthquake and Informal Settlements in Kathmandu

START
Thu, Feb 18, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 18, 2016 at 02:00pm

VENUE
Room 124, Gund Hall

ADDRESS
Gund Hall, Room 124
48 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

Informal settlements are the common features of urban growth in most developing countries and are typically the product of an urgent need for shelter by the urban poor. Rapid urbanization, inefficient land administration and inadequate capability to cope with the housing needs of people in urban areas have contributed to the development of informal settlements or slums. The problem related to informal settlements is a very serious urban issue for developing countries. Informal settlers are more exposed and vulnerable to natural hazards that the general population and they are more likely to be affected and displaced by disasters. They tends to receive less housing assistance in their aftermath and are one of the vulnerable groups after disasters as they do not have legal land ownership documents and they are invisible on the records of city authorities. The humanitarian response and the reconstruction program led by central government or concerned authority tends to overlook informal settlers. The spatial data and technology can play a significant role for building resilience of vulnerable urban groups such as informal settlers. This presentation explores the role of spatial data infrastructure (SDI) and technology for disaster risk reduction and community resilience. A case of Nepal Earthquake 2015 has been taken as a case study.

Dev Raj Paudyal is a Lecturer in the School of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Australia. He has a M. Sc. Degree in Geoinformation Management (GIM2) from ITC, the Netherlands and a Doctor of Philosophy from University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Australia. He has more than 15 years of professional experience and approximately 40 research publications. Dev is currently the individual member representative and director at Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Association (GSDIA) Board, Past President of International Geospatial Society (IGA), Co-chair of International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Technical Commission WGIV/4, member of Mixed Methods International Research Association and registered Graduate Surveyor at Surveyors Board of Queensland (SBQ), Australia. Dev’s research interests lie in the areas of cadastral, land and geographic information systems, land administration, spatial data infrastructures, disaster management, urban planning including informal settlements, building resilience of vulnerable groups after disaster and natural resource management.

Cosponsored with the Harvard Graduate School of Design MDes Risk and Resilience Lecture


Opening reception: Altered State: Painting in Myanmar in a Time of Transition

START
Thu, Feb 11, 2016 at 04:30pm

END
Thu, Feb 11, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South Concourse
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South Concourse
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

‘Altered State: Painting Myanmar in a time of transition,’ an exhibit of paintings will be on display Thursday, February 4 – Monday, February 22, 2016 in the Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA

Seminar on February 19: Freedom and Fear in Myanmar with Ian Holliday,Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning), The University of Hong Kong

Cosponsored with the Asia Center


Re-thinking Local: A Cross-regional Dialogue about Strategies for Local Practice in Cities

START
Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 02:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Student Event

“Re-thinking Local” will examine how architects are developing new models of locally-based design practice given the changing realities of urbanization around the world, with a particular focus on South and Southeast Asia.

These two public events feature Vo Trong Nghia, the most prolific contemporary architect in Vietnam, and Marina Tabassum, the leading female architect in Bangladesh – both speaking at Harvard for the first time.

In addition, Nghia and Tabassum will be joined in a round-table discussion by Michael Murphy, Executive Director of MASS Design Group, and Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning at Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

This public discussion program will thematically explore how architects are responding to new patterns of urbanization, creating models for construction and fabrication that support sustainable development, and catalyzing local institutions to promote dialogue about the role of design in improving cities. Together, the work of these architects gives new meaning to the model of practicing locally.

Click here for participant bios.

Roundtable discussion with Vo Trong Nghia, Marina Tabassum, and Michael Murphy, moderated by Rahul Mehrotra
Monday, February 22, 2016, 6:30 pm
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South S010, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Lunchtime Lecture with Vo Trong Nghia
Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 1:00 pm
Portico 124, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy Street

Please contact  Michael Haggerty, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, haggerty@gsd.harvard.edu, with questions.

Cosponsored with the Boston Society of Architects Foundation, Harvard Asia Center, and Harvard Mellon Urban Initiative.


Explore Careers in South Asia: Panel and Mixer

START
Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 05:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 06:30pm

VENUE
Harvard Office of Career Services

ADDRESS
Harvard Office of Career Services
54 Dunster St
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Have you ever thought about working in South Asia, but are unsure of what opportunities exist and what it would be like? Hear from panelists who have worked in a variety of sectors in South Asia including global health, technology, start-ups, and media/journalism. Enjoy food from the region while you learn more about the various types of opportunities available, and how you can get started. After the panel, we will have an informal mixer, where you can meet with the panelists and talk with them more about their experiences. Please register through Crimson Careers.

Panelists include:

  • Joanna Jolly, Shorenstein Fellow & BBC South Asia Editor
  • Karima Ladhani, ScD Candidate HSPH ’18, Founder & CEO of Barakat Bundle
  • Sidhant Jena, HBS ’11, Founder of Jana Care

 

Join the Facebook event.

 

Cosponsored with the Harvard College US-India Initiative and the Harvard South Asian Association.


India Conference at Harvard

START
Sat, Feb 6, 2016

END
Sun, Feb 7, 2016

VENUE
Harvard Kennedy School TBD

ADDRESS
Harvard Kennedy School
79 John F. Kennedy St
Cambridge, MA

India in Transition – Opportunities and Challenges

 

The India Conference at Harvard is one of the largest India conferences in the US. It is hosted at the Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School by the graduate students of Harvard University.

In 2016 we will be celebrating our 13th anniversary. The conference will bring together business leaders, entertainment professionals, government officials, philanthropists, and many other leaders to engage in a conversation about India’s path to Global leadership. Our 2015 conference had over 600 attendees and was a resounding success.

Visit the conference website and register. 


Summer Grant Opportunities Open House

START
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Come hear about SAI Summer Funding opportunities, including research and internship grants, and ask any last minute questions about the application process.

Deadline to apply: February 17, 2016

Join the Facebook event.


Corporate Philanthropy Between Empire and Nation: Tata and the Making of Modern India

START
Mon, Feb 1, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Feb 1, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S354
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Mircea Raianu, PhD Candidate, History Department, FAS; SAI Graduate Student Associate

Chair Sunil AmrithMehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

From one of many merchant families in the port city of Bombay in the mid-nineteenth century, Tata became India’s largest and most influential business firm by the time of independence in 1947, with interests ranging from steel to hydroelectricity, chemicals, and aviation. In parallel, Tata philanthropy took on the burden of development beyond the economic domain, from scientific research to modernist art. This talk will examine the transformation of Tata philanthropy from community-based charity to “constructive” projects on a national scale, and account for the expansive transnational set of actors brought together by Tata patronage, including scientists, technocrats, intellectuals, and artists. The talk will show how the pattern of Tata philanthropic donations was neither the expression of an underlying nationalist vision, nor a purely strategic calculus. Institutions such as the Indian Institute of Science (1909), the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (1936), and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (1947) fulfilled the imagined developmental needs of the nation-state-in-waiting, while at the same time remaining inseparably connected to the firm’s need for technology and expertise in the mills of Bombay and the new steel township of Jamshedpur.


Capacity Building Workshop on Rural Livelihoods Creations in the Indian Crafts Sector

START
Mon, Jan 11, 2016

END
Thu, Jan 14, 2016

VENUE
Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India

ADDRESS
Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India

Livelihood Creation Workshop

The Tata Trusts and SAI have collaborated for the Project on Livelihood Creation in India through Social Entrepreneurship and Skill Development’. This Capacity Building Workshop is for organizations from the Handicrafts and Handlooms sectors.

Mukti Khaire, Faculty Chair; Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Dr. Shashank Shah, Project Director, Harvard University South Asia Institute; and Visiting Scholar, Harvard Business School

The production of handicrafts is (after agriculture) the largest source of income among rural populations – an estimated 11.65 million Indians were engaged in craft production in 2013 and this is expected to grow to 13.93 million in 2017 and 17.79 million in 2022. Data from unofficial sources indicate that up to 200 million craftspeople or artisans depend on this sector for a livelihood. The project on Rural Livelihoods focuses on supporting and strengthening the organizational infrastructure of enterprises in the handicrafts and handlooms sectors.

This Capacity Building Workshop aims to provide the support enterprises need in this sector. The workshop will be a focused program that will enable capacity building through knowledge inputs, networking support, social innovation grant funding and mentoring..

More details here.

For questions, please contact kundanmadireddy@fas.harvard.edu.






Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Megacity

START
Mon, Jan 18, 2016 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Jan 18, 2016 at 08:30pm

VENUE
CSMVS Museum, Mumbai

ADDRESS
CSMVS Museum, Mumbai
159-161 Mahatma Gandhi Road
Fort, Mumbai - 400023, Maharashtra, India

Special Event

Welcome by Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Director, CSMVS Museum

Introductory remarks by Vikram Gandhi, Harvard South Asia Institute Advisory Council Member; Founder, Asha Impact

Diana Eck, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Harvard Divinity School

Devesh Chaturvedi, Divisional Commissioner, Allahabad, at the 2013 Kumbh Mela

Satchit Balsari, Weill Cornell Global Emergency Medicine Division; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Alok Sharma, Inspector General of Police, Allahabad, at the 2013 Kumbh Mela

Facilitated by Rahul Mehrotra, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Since its inception early in the first millennium CE, the Kumbh Mela has become the largest public gathering in the world. Today it draws tens of millions of pilgrims over the course of a few weeks. Among the pilgrims at the 2013 Kumbh Mela was a team of some 50 people – faculty, students, and researchers from Harvard University. The team was making an in-depth study of a gathering that is not only a remarkable religious experience, but also a remarkable exercise in urban planning, public health, government administration, security, and commerce.

Launched in 2015, the Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Megacity book and exhibition consolidate research findings and serve as an example of interdisciplinary research conducted at Harvard. The faculty leaders and Kumbh administrators will discuss their experience studying the world’s largest festival, and lessons learned for future research.

Please register here.

 

Cosponsored with the Asia Society India Centre and the Harvard Club of Mumbai


Mental Health in Disaster Response – Local and International Perspectives

START
Wed, Dec 16, 2015 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Dec 16, 2015 at 08:00pm

The Aman Foundation and the Harvard University South Asia Institute have co-sponsored this conference on mental health in the wake of natural and manmade disasters in Pakistan.

Coping in the Wake of Disasters: Long term Effects of Traumatic “Life-Changing” Situations

Sharmeen Khan, Clinical Psychologist

Sharmeen Khan is a Karachi-based mental health professional and a human rights activist. She has successfully run various campaigns to provide relief at several disasters from the earthquake of 2005 to the earthquake of 2015, as well as other natural and manmade disasters both in Pakistan and abroad. She spearheaded the Naya Jeevan initiative of providing psychological help to survivors of the Army Public School, Peshawar attack. Sharmeen is currently working towards completing a PhD in Disaster Psychology at the University of Karachi.

Panel Discussion:

Dr. Ruth Barron, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Director of Outpatient Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Dr. Mihir Bhatt, Founder and Director, All India Disaster Management Institute

Dr. Jennifer Leaning, FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, T.H. Chan Harvard School of Public Health; Director FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard University

Dr. Ayesha Mian, Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

Dr. Junaid Razzak, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Former CEO, AMAN Healthcare Services

This event will be followed by an invitation-only roundtable discussion from the 17th-18th of December 2015 with key stakeholders in mental health and disaster management in Pakistan. If you are interested in participating in this discussion, please send an email with a 250 word bio about yourself to: shajia_sarfraz@mail.harvard.edu