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SAI Event Type : Seminars


The Radcliffe Boundary Commission: Cartography and Conflict in the Partition of India and Pakistan

START
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Partition Seminar

Lucy ChesterAssociate Professor, University of Colorado Boulder

Over a period of six weeks in the summer of 1947, Cyril Radcliffe, a British lawyer who had never been to India and had no experience in boundary-making, drew a 2500-mile-long line that would divide India and Pakistan. This talk will examine the pseudo-judicial framework and deeply politicized nature of the Radcliffe Boundary Commission’s work. I aim to clarify the geographical thinking of the main political parties involved in this commission, the reasoning behind Radcliffe’s deliberations, and the boundary’s role in partition violence.

The role of maps, as texts that communicate contemporary attitudes and beliefs, will receive particular attention. Many of the maps used in this division had been created as tools of colonial control. The “silences” of such maps, such as the absence of information about the inhabitants of the territory depicted, significantly impacted the Radcliffe Commission’s work. Other maps were the product of nationalist attempts to shape independent South Asia. They had silences of their own, with costs and benefits that continue to influence what is arguably a still unfolding partition.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar. | Facebook Event


The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition / Crowd Sourcing Memories

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Partition Seminar

5:00 – 6:00 PM: The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition

Prashant Bharadwaj, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego

This paper examines how areas affected by the partition fare in the long run. Using migrant presence as a proxy for the intensity of the impact of the partition, and district level data on agricultural output between 1911-2009, we find that areas that received more migrants have higher average yields, are more likely to take up high yielding varieties (HYV) of seeds, and are more likely to use agricultural technologies. These correlations are more pronounced after the Green Revolution in India. Using pre-partition data, we show that migrant placement is uncorrelated with soil conditions, agricultural infrastructure, and agricultural yields prior to 1947; hence, the effects are not solely explained by selective migration into districts with a higher potential for agricultural development. Migrants moving to India were more educated than both the natives who stayed and the migrants who moved out. Given the positive association of education with the adoption of high yielding varieties of seeds we highlight the presence of educated migrants during the timing of the Green Revolution as a potential pathway for the observed effects.

6:00 – 7:00 PM: Crowd Sourcing Memories of Partition

Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

This part of the project is focusing on oral accounts of the Partition. They are attempting to build a comprehensive database of oral histories through crowd-sourcing, and the use of modern techniques to collect, analyze, and store information from an individual’s experience. The aim is to preserve the rightful spot of these stories in history and give a voice to the realities experienced in the data and surrounding research. The project will enrich the descriptive picture of the event and extend the implications of these stories to understand consequences today.

Light refreshments will be served.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30 about the project. All are welcome.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Facebook EventAdd to your calendar.


Religion, Ethics, and Nascent Nationalism and the Partition

START
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Partition Seminar

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Given that Partition is widely considered to have resulted due to religious differences, it is critical to explore the interplay between religion and nationalism in pre-Partition rhetoric, in the post-Partition riots, and in the actual migration process. It is interesting, also, to explore, the historical root of the idea of a separate Muslim homeland, as well as histories of multi-faith society in India.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar. | Facebook Event


Gender and the Partition

START
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Partition Seminar

Catherine WarnerCollege Fellow in South Asian Studies and History, Harvard University

When Partition is viewed from the lens of gender history, what happens? Is this the same history with women’s voices added and silences interpreted, or does it offer alternate scales and geographies? To what extent did Partition shape the gendering of citizenship in South Asia? This seminar will examine how narratives of gendered violence have been collected, read, and interpreted in Partition historiography. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to survey the state of the field and consider possibilities for future research on citizenship, gender, coercion and mobility in post-colonial South Asia.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30. All are welcome.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event


Historical and Humanitarian Consequences of Migration

START
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

The seminar will take place in CGIS S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA.

Partition Seminar

Jennifer Leaning, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

The seminar will explore the story of the mass migration of Hindus/Sikhs and Muslims from Pakistan and India respectively into the other country and the resulting humanitarian crisis. Professor Leaning will analyze: the Boundary Commission’s work, the patterns of migration, and unprecedented sectarian violence, including massacres, physical violence, and destruction of property. Leaning will also consider ethics and mechanics of care provided as part of immediate relief. Special attention will be focused on the role played by the main players during and after Partition, including the key political parties and individuals. Erum Sattar, SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School, will provide insights into how water issues relate to Partition.

Light refreshments will be served.

From 5 to 5:30, we will be hosting a group discussion about the SAI initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of Partition in crowd proportions. The goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. All are welcome to attend the discussion.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event

#SAIPartition




A Conversation with Navtej Sarna, Indian Ambassador to the US

START
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 05:15pm

END
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 06:45pm

Special Event

Navtej Sarna, Indian Ambassador to the US

Chair: Tarun KhannaJorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, South Asia Institute

Ambassador Sarna took charge as Ambassador of India to the United States on November 5, 2016. He has been a Member of the Indian Foreign Service since 1980.

He was previously posted in London as High Commissioner, and before moving to London, Mr Sarna was Secretary (West) in the Ministry of External Affairs. Mr Sarna was among the longest-serving spokespersons of the ministry between 2002 and 2008. He has also had postings in Moscow, Warsaw, Tehran, Geneva and Thimphu. Mr Sarna is also a prolific author of many fiction and non-fiction books, recently ‘Second Thoughts: On Books, Authors and the Writerly Life’ that was released last year.

Reception to follow.

Please note: This event will be off the record (Chatham House Rules).


Artist Talk: Boys don’t cry

START
Mon, Dec 5, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Dec 5, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Meenakshi Sengupta, Visiting Artist, South Asia Institute Arts Program

Chair: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture, South and Southeast Asian Art, Harvard University

This talk will focus on the celebration of womanhood and how Sengupta comes to this work. Boys don’t cry is a title of her recent drawing series. She will mainly talk about her practice and how she developed her language primarily surrounded by conventional art practice, and finally the way she explore that form into a broader aspect. Her talk will be supported by an audio-visual presentation of her works, followed by a discussion.

Born in 1987, Kolkota, India and Sengupta holds a B.V.A. 2011 (Painting), from the University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India and a M.F.A. 2013 (Painting) with distinction (Gold Medal), from the Maharaja Sayajirao University, Baroda, India. Since then she has been practicing her art and showing it together with Gallery Maskara, Mumbai, India. In her work, she uses traditional pictorial representation to push formal and aesthetic conventions producing new meaning by using wit and irony to explore gender identity and complexities in contemporary life.

Lunch will be served.

Sengupta will also lead an interactive art work on Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 3PM at SAI’s office in CGIS South, 4th Floor.

South Asia Institute Visiting Artist Program


Artist talk: Waking Whispers

START
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Komal Shahid Khan, Visiting Artist, South Asia Institute Arts Program

Chair: Susan S. BeanChair, Art & Archaeology Center, American Institute of Indian Studies; Board Member, Textile Society of America; Associate, Peabody Museum, Harvard University; Senior Curator for South Asian and Korean Art. Peabody Essex Museum

Starting with an introduction and practices which lead to her specialization in Miniature painting, Khan will discuss how her work evolved over time, from traditional to conceptual and experimental. She will be talking about her Projects/ Series of Paintings, including: ‘Riddle, I call Life’ (2014), ‘Revelation’ (2015), ‘Aura’ (2015), ‘Her’ (2016), and ‘Imagined Immortals’ (2016).

She will show each painting briefly, commenting on individuals, society and the understanding of consciousness and unconsciousness and how her recent work is based upon what she calls “poetics of masquerade’’ in which the painted narratives are timeless and familiar.

Khan is a Visual Artist, based in Islamabad, Pakistan. She graduated from the University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan in 2012 and then did her Master in Fine Arts from Fatima Jinnah Women University Rawalpindi, Pakistan with specialization in Miniature Painting. On completing the degree in 2014, she scored Distinction and was awarded Gold Medal for herb Thesis Show in 2014. Since graduating, she started her career with Group Shows in art galleries in Islamabad/Rawalpindi and then moved on to Lahore and Karachi as well. She is presently teaching at the National College of Arts Rawalpindi, Pakistan, as a Lecturer. October, 2016 marks her First Solo Exhibition entitled as “Imagined Immortals” in Karachi, Pakistan.

Lunch will be served.

The South Asia Institute Visiting Artist Program hosts emerging artists at Harvard to engage with faculty, students, and the Harvard community.


India and Japan, India and China

START
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

Tarun Das,  former Director-General and Chief Mentor of the Confederation of Indian Industries

Chair:  Professor Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Cosponsored with the Asia Center Seminar Series, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, and the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University


Research Methods Talk: Using Corpus Analysis to Study Media Discourse: Comparing Discussions of Islamic Marriage Reform in India and Pakistan

START
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Cosponsored Event

Sharon Tai, Research Editor, SHARIAsource

Ali Hashmi, MIT Media Lab Research Affiliate (2015-2016) and SHARIAsource Editor/Data Scientist

Osama Siddique, Henry J. Steiner Visiting Professor in Human Rights, Harvard Law School, Law and Policy Research Network

This talk focuses on using corpus analysis as a research method. Media discourse on legislative issues provides a rich source for deriving research questions. This talk asks for feedback on the development of a new corpus analysis tool that is being used to analyze and compare how contemporary media in India and Pakistan is shaping discourse about issues of marriage reform and Islamic law. The tool uses source corpora from Media Cloud, which is a collaborative project between the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Osama Siddique, Harvard Law School, will be a respondent to the panel by giving feedback on how the tool could be used, improved, and further developed from his experience as a scholar, lawyer, and social scientist.

Cosponsored with ILSP: SHARIAsource at Harvard Law School

Light refreshments will be provided

*Please note the change in location.