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SAI Event Type : Seminars


An Evening with Rana Dasgupta

START
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 09:00pm

Cosponsored Event

A public reading and discussion with British-Indian author Rana Dasgupta. Rana is a novelist and essayist, and the winner of the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for his novel Solo. He currently lives in Delhi and his nonfiction book Capital constructs an intimate oral history to unfold the possibilities and catastrophes of the city’s elite class. Rana is in the United States to lecture this month at Brown University.

No RSVP required. Refreshments will be served.

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/420864254936925/

Sponsored by the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard South Asia Institute


Rethinking Empires and Space: Histories of South Asia(ns), Mobility & Boundary Making

START
Tue, Apr 18, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Tue, Apr 18, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
William James Hall, 1550

ADDRESS
William James Hall, 1550
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge MA

Cosponsored Event

Panelists:
Kornel Chang, Associate Professor of History and American Studies at Rutgers University-Newark

Catherine Warner, College Fellow in South Asian Studies and History at Harvard University

Vazira Zamindar, Associate Professor of History at Brown University

Discussants:
Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies Professor of History at Harvard University

Hardeep Dhillon, Ph.D. Candidate, History at Harvard University

In the last several decades, the historiography of South Asia has grappled with the prevalence of circulation and mobility in the past, overturning long-held notions of South Asia as a static society prior to colonial intervention, and developed increasingly nuanced analyses of global connections. The production of itinerant subjectivities, the making of new forms of sovereign power, and the creation of a modern, centralizing state are historical dynamics that all call for a re-examination of empire and space. This panel explores these and related issues through forms of boundary making and mobility.

Organized by the Harvard South Asia Institute and South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop 
Co-sponsored by Boston University School of Global Studies Center for the Study of Asia, Task Force on Asian & Pacific American Studies, Tufts Center for South Asian and Indian Ocean Studies


Legal Identity for Children in South Asia: The Role of Birth Registration and Biometric Identification

START
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Amiya Bhatia, Doctor of Science student in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Discussant: Connor Jerzak, PhD student, Government Department

South Asia has the largest number of children who do not have birth certificates. As biometric identification programs (e.g. Aadhaar in India, NADRA in Pakistan) expand, many countries continue to have weak birth registration systems, denying children access to legal identity. This talk examines the unequal distribution of birth certificates and identification documents within each country in South Asia, and whether biometric identification programs could weaken, complement or improve birth registration systems.


Artist Talk: Landscape of Abstraction

START
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 01:30pm

Arts Seminar

Madhu Das, Visiting Artist, SAI Arts Program

Chair: Susan Bean, Independent Scholar and Chair, Art & Archaeology Center, American Institute of Indian Studies

Madhu Das is a multi-disciplinary Visual Artist based in Mumbai, India; his artistic practice is primarily concerned with the projection of identity onto the social and natural world: in a way that the two are woven together in the Indian space (both mythic space and actual); Exploring both conceptual and material sensibilities through range of media including drawing and painting, photography, performance, video, site-specific interventions, collaborative community projects and interactive/performative installations.

In his work, human body often establish an improvisational relationship with object and sculptural elements in the space. The work has involved the spaces in both a narrative sense and as a site of memory to re-narrate historical events as a way of plotting connections between the particular and the universal. Subjectively, he adapt aspects of material culture as well as methods from anthropology, allegorical fiction as conceptual tool, which later extends to the space of the viewer, from the point of a storyteller, exploring exciting linguistic devices and imagery with a sense of irony and paradox.

Lunch will be served.

SAI Visiting Artist Program

The location is Memorial Hall Meade Room 030, 45 Quincy Street. 

 

Directions


Conversation on the Intersection of Culture, Journalism and Religion

START
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Madeeha Syed, Pakistani Journalist

Marco Werman, The World

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Join Pakistani journalist Madeeha Syed, Marco Werman from Public Radio International’s The World, and Ali S. Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures at Harvard University, for a conversation about the intersection of culture, journalism and religion in today’s global environment.

The conversation is cosponsored by the Center Stage program of New England Foundation For The Arts and SAI

Reception to follow.


Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Mar. 1. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.


“Argaḍa” and “Nirargaḍa”

START
Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 01:30pm

Cosponsored Event

Liu Zhen, Professor, National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies, Fudan University; Visiting Scholar, Harvard-Yenching Institute

Chair/Discussant: Michael Witzel, Wales Professor of Sanskrit, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

This talk will offer a short introduction to the Sanskrit word “argaḍa” and its antonym “nirargaḍa”. The word “argaḍa” first appears in Brāhmaṇa literature to refer to a bolt that locks a cowshed. The word continued to be used in post-Vedic literature, including Hindu, Buddhist, and Jainist texts in which it refers to a bolt used on the door of a house or city gate. A more detailed description of an argaḍa is, however, found in the technical texts and its image is found in works of art. “Argaḍa” and its antonym “nirargaḍa” later became a paired metaphor used in a religious context. In addition to this pair of words, this presentation will discuss the related compound “nirargaḍamedha,” which means a kind of sacrifice.

Liu Zhen studied Indology, Tibetology and Sinology at Universität-München, Germany from 2001-2008. He is currently a professor in the National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies, and Director of the Center for Gandhian and Indian Studies, at Fudan University. His research specialties are Veda and Vedic literature, comparisons between Chinese and Indian literature, Indian Mahā- and Hīna-yāna Buddhism, comparisons of Indian, Tibetan and Chinese Buddhist documents, Sanskrit manuscripts and Indian and Central Asian art.

Cosponsored with Harvard Yenching Institute


Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

START
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Special Event

About the group discussion:

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Feb. 1. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

Add to your calendar.


Enfranchising Your Own? Experimental Evidence on Bureaucrat Diversity and Election Bias

START
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Yusuf Neggers, Postdoctoral Fellow, Watson Institute, Brown University

Simon Chauchard, Assistant Professor of Government Department, Dartmouth College

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Read the seminar paper.

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

 


Coins as Historical Puzzles: Examples from Ancient India

START
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Coins are small metallic documents of the past. In the images and legends impressed upon them, they contain clues that can give us insights into the times in which they were created and used. In this talk, examples from ancient India will be used to show how the unpuzzling of these clues can help us bring back forgotten dynasties, recreate historical events and shine a light on political and economic conditions.


The Lessons Private Schools Teach: Using a Field Experiment to Understand the Effects of Private Schools on Political Behavior

START
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Emmerich Davies Escobar, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard University Graduate School of Education 

Bryce Millett Steinberg, Postdoctoral Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

Read the seminar paper.


Dastangoi: The art of Urdu storytelling

START
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

*Please not the change in start time.

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Ankit Chadha, Storyteller / Author

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Dastangoi, the lost art of Urdu storytelling, developed in eighth century A.D. around the adventures of an Arab hero, Amir Hamza. These stories became very popular in the 19th century North India. With the demise of the last known exponent of the art form in 1928, Mir Baqar Ali, the form also died with him. The modern revival has seen not just the performance of the traditional stories from the Hamza dastan, but also the adaptations of more local and contemporary themes. Ankit Chadha, a writer and storyteller, has been a practitioner of Dastangoi since 2010. His writing varies from biographical accounts of personalities like Kabir, Rahim, Dara Shikoh and Majaaz to modern folk tales on corporate culture, internet and mobile technology. Ankit also has works for young audiences and has worked on Urdu adaptations of children’s classics; including Alice and The Little Prince. He is the author of the award-winning book for children, My Gandhi Story, and the recently released, Amir Khusrau – The Man in Riddles.