Select Page

Events

SAI Event Topic : Urbanization

The Secret Life of Cities

START
Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 06:30pm

END
Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 06:30pm

Urbanization Lecture Series

Series of Lectures with Suketu Mehta, author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found

Read a summary of the event: Exploring a city’s narrative

Tuesday, Oct. 21: “Migration: Storytelling the City(6:30PM, Piper Auditorium GSD)
The worldwide stampede to urban areas has produced a set of narratives about the city; dislocation demands recollection. What are the official and unofficial stories of our cities? How do they attract migrants? The mystery of the self as it relates to the mystery of the city. 

Wednesday, Oct. 22: “Alienation: The Sadness of Cities” (6:30PM, Piper Auditorium GSD)
Each city has its own sadness: loneliness, inequality, slums. After we have stayed in a city awhile, it becomes mapped with love, experienced and lost. The conjunctions between poetry and urbanism.

Thursday, Oct. 23: Community: What is the City but the People?(6:30PM, Stubbins 112, Gund Hall GSD)
Cities can be resilient not just in their physical structure but in their spirit. In the absence of a functioning government, they survive through a series of solidarity networks that sustain the populace, small solutions for the big city. What role does the state have in fostering them? How do we fashion a city that may not include everybody, but excludes nobody?

What is the city but the people?” asks Shakespeare in Coriolanus.

In this series of lectures, writer Suketu Mehta looks at the urban human being, exploring themes of migration, loneliness, and community in the world’s cities. Mehta is author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found (2004), which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. He has won the Whiting Writers Award and an O. Henry Prize for his essays and fiction, which have appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Harper’s, Time, and Newsweek, and featured on NPR’s “Fresh Air” and “All Things Considered.” Mehta is currently working on a book about immigrants in contemporary New York, for which he received a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Both venues are in Gund Hall, Harvard Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy St, Cambridge MA

Cosponsored with the Harvard Graduate School of Design


Healing Bodies, Healing Spaces: Understanding Urban Religiosity in Contemporary India

START
Mon, Oct 6, 2014 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Oct 6, 2014 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Urbanization Seminar

Smriti Srinivas, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis

Chair: Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Cosponsored with the Harvard University Social Anthropology Colloquium

This presentation seeks to understand the ethnographic and analytical registers of contemporary urban religiosity in India. Grounded spatially in Professor Srinivas’ long-term research in Bangalore, India’s “Silicon Valley” of nearly nine million people, it discusses what Srinivas calls the “sacrality of urban sprawl,” i.e. the fact that cities and their expanding boundaries (whether suburban, exurban, or peri-urban) are important arenas for the recruitment of devotees, the construction of habitats to house the religious, new spiritual maps, and ideas of selfhood.

An exploration of the strata and groups who inhabit these spaces is not the main focus of this paper. It is clear, however, that most could be seen as constituting the “new middle class” that represents and lays claim to the benefits of liberalization. Srinivas tries to show that in addition to consumption patterns and lifestyles, new norms of (religious) selfhood are crucial to the production of their identity. Further, while much attention in recent years has been paid to ideologies and displays of religious nationalisms, fundamentalisms and violence in urban areas, Srinivas draws attention in this paper instead to other maps, sensibilities, and architectures of religiosity.

Dr. Smriti Srinivas is Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis. She received her PhD. from the Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi (1995). Her research and teaching interests include urban cultures, place-making, utopias, social memory, cultures of the body and performance, religion, South Asia within a comparative context.


Global Literature Book Group: Behind the Beautiful Forevers

START
Mon, Mar 31, 2014 at 07:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 31, 2014 at 08:00pm

Discussant: Shankar Ramaswami, South Asia Institute South Asian Studies Postdoctoral Fellow

Join the Harvard Global Health Institute and the South Asia Institute in a live webinar discussion for K-12 educators of Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo.

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption. With a little luck, her sensitive, beautiful daughter—Annawadi’s “most-everything girl”—will soon become its first female college graduate. And even the poorest Annawadians, like Kalu, a fifteen-year-old scrap-metal thief, believe themselves inching closer to the good lives and good times they call “the full enjoy.”

But then Abdul the garbage sorter is falsely accused in a shocking tragedy; terror and a global recession rock the city; and suppressed tensions over religion, caste, sex, power and economic envy turn brutal. As the tenderest individual hopes intersect with the greatest global truths, the true contours of a competitive age are revealed. And so, too, are the imaginations and courage of the people of Annawadi.

With intelligence, humor, and deep insight into what connects human beings to one another in an era of tumultuous change, Behind the Beautiful Forevers carries the reader headlong into one of the twenty-first century’s hidden worlds, and into the lives of people impossible to forget.

Register now to attend this session. The first 15 K-12 educators who register will receive a free book – see instructions on registration form.

More information about Global Studies Outreach at Harvard.


Innovation, Exploitation, and Documentation in the 21st-Century Slums

START
Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 06:30pm

END
Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 08:00pm

VENUE
Piper Auditorium
Graduate School of Design
Harvard University

ADDRESS
Piper Auditorium
Graduate School of Design
Harvard University
48 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA

Urbanization Seminar

Katherine Boo, New Yorker Staff Writer, Author of Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity, Senior Loeb Scholar at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Katherine is a staff writer at the The New Yorker Magazine and the author of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, winner of the National Book Award and PEN/Galbraith Award. Her journalism on how social and economic policy affects disadvantaged communities combines immersive and investigative techniques, and has been recognized by a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, a National Magazine Award, and a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.

Cosponsored with the Harvard Graduate School of Design


The Beautification of Postwar Colombo

START
Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Urbanization Seminar

Jonathan Spencer, Professor of the Anthropology of South Asia & Head of School of Social and Political Science, Social Anthropology, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh

Chair: Charles Hallisey, Yehan Numata Senior Lecturer on Buddhist Literatures, Harvard Divinity School

Since the end of the country’s 30-year civil war in 2009, the Sri Lankan armed forces have continued to grow despite the absence of obvious military threats to the government. Under the guidance of the President’s brother, the Ministry of Defence now plays a leading role in town planning through the Urban Development Authority (which is formally part of the Ministry). Colombo has seen an aggressive programme of improvement, which started with a “war” on alleged underworld figures, has taken in the eviction of hawkers from pedestrian spaces, the creation of new leisure areas, and now would seem to involve the clearance of “sub-standard” housing, especially in places like Slave Island, an historically dense and religiously and culturally mixed area near the city centre. This talk will explore the different kinds of politics that may be at work in this moment, and ask what the project of “beautifying” Colombo might tell us about the political dynamics of postwar Sri Lanka.

Cosponsored with the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation



Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Small Cities, Big Issues: Why Small Cities Matter in Debates on Urban Poverty and Inequality

Neema KudvaAssociate Professor, City & Regional Planning, Cornell University

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Planning and Design and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design


Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 06:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 08:00pm

The Future of South Asia: A Landscape of Pluralism

Rahul Mehrotra, Professor and Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Chair: Hiteshkumar Hathi, Producer of NPR’s ‘Here and Now’

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Watch this seminar here.


Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Wed, Nov 9, 2011 at 06:30pm

END
Wed, Nov 9, 2011 at 08:00pm

Planned Neighborhoods: The Long-term Account of An American Design Concept in Independent India

Co-sponsored with the Harvard Graduate School of Design
Sanjeev VidyarthiAssistant Professor of Urban Planning & Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago
Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor and Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

View the seminar through Vimeo, here.


Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Fri, Feb 3, 2012

END
Sat, Feb 4, 2012

Urban Design Conference: Conditions and Projections

Sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Co-sponsored by the South Asia Initiative, The Andes Initiative at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University, The Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard UniversitySwissnex Boston, Switzerland’s science and technology outpost in Boston, and the Loeb Fellowship Program, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

The contemporary conditions that are shaping the built environment globally are of an unprecedented scale and complexity creating the need for a critical evaluation of the methods, tools, and the broader design culture that surrounds the practice of Urban Design. The focus of the conference is to explore the state of urban design globally, and to critically appraise the discipline’s legacy throughout the course of the twentieth century. Furthermore, the conference hopes to propel a discussion about the unfulfilled potential of the practice of urban design and the role it can play in mediating the different disciplines and forces that eventually mold the built environment in our cities, suburbs and peri-urban conditions – the larger landscape that comprises the objects of human interventions of various kinds. It is the objective of the conference to both calibrate the nature of these shifts as well as to speculate about the potential trajectories the practice of urban design could take in the future.


Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 06:30pm

END
Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 08:00pm

A Tale of Three Cities: India’s Urban Future

Chaired by Rahul Mehrotra, Professor and Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Date: Thursday, March 08, 2012 6:30 pm-8:00 pm
Location: Stubbins Room, Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge , MA 02138

Ravi Kalia, Professor of Asian Studies, Division of Humanities and the Arts, City College of New York, CUNY

 

Watch the video:


Urbanization Seminar Series

START
Wed, Apr 18, 2012 at 08:00am

END
Wed, Apr 18, 2012 at 05:00pm

Mega-Cities, the Urban Poor and the Price of Planning: The Case of Slum Upgrading in Indian Cities

Chair: Rahul Mehrotra, Professor and Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Janice Perlman, Founder & President of the Mega-Cities Project

Co-sponsored with the Harvard Graduate School of Design

 

Watch the video below: