Select Page

SAI Event Region : India


Global Health Seminar Series

START
Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 04:30pm

END
Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 06:00pm

VENUE
FXB Building, Room G13
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

ADDRESS
FXB Building, Room G13
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health
651 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA

What is mhealth? Its Future and Its Implications

Michael Frost, Director, JSI Center for mHealth, Technical Advisor, USAID Deliver Project

Joel D. Selanikio, MD, FAAP, CEO and co-founder, DataDyne.org, Assistant Professor, Georgetown University Department of Pediatrics

Patricia Mechael, Executive Director, mHealth Alliance, United Nations Foundation

Chair: Marc Mitchell, Lecturer on Global Health, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health; D-Tree International

**Please note that this event is now at the Harvard School of Public Health**


Extraordinary Law at the Colonial Frontier: Notes on the East India Company Archive

START
Fri, Mar 29, 2013 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 29, 2013 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Extraordinary Law at the Colonial Frontier: Notes on the East India Company Archive

Bhavani RamanAssistant Professor of History; David L. Rike University Preceptor in History; Princeton University

Chair: Parimal PatilProfessor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Co-sponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

We often think of martial law being deployed upon suspension of municipal law in the context of urban civil unrest. Raman draws on East India Company archives from the Madras and Bengal Presidencies to argue that in India between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, martial law is deployed in largely unsettled, jungle-infested frontier lands in contexts in which municipal law is absent. At stake in this use of martial law is the ability of the British East India Company – then a corporate sovereign power – to designate certain inhabitants as “rebellious” in order to justify the acquisition of their land and resources.

Raman’s discussion of martial law takes us beyond its immediate economic repercussions to its long-term effects. Martial law is used in this context with the specific intent of restricting free trade and expanding the agrarian resources of a trading company – all in the name of security and protection. Examples drawn from this context, Raman argues compellingly, will contribute to current conversations about the aims and effects of emergency law in various international contexts.

Written by Deonnie Moodie, PhD Candidate at GSAS

 

 

 

 

 

 


Educators for Teaching India Conference

START
Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 03:00pm

Democracy in India: Past Present Future

Keynote Speaker:
Ananya Vajpeyi, Author of Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India,
Associate Fellow, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi,
Senior, American Institute of Indian Studies

Sponsored by:
Educators for Teaching India in conjunction with The Winsor School, Phillips Academy and The Groton SchoolFor more information and to register: http://www.teachingindia.org/For more information about this event, click here.


Education Reform Measures in India: Lessons from the World

START
Wed, May 8, 2013 at 02:45pm

END
Wed, May 8, 2013 at 07:15pm

VENUE
Inn at Harvard

ADDRESS
Inn at Harvard
1201 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

On May 8, the South Asia Institute at Harvard University (SAI) and the Central Square Foundation (CSF) convened a group of high-level stakeholders for a roundtable discussion to shape and commit on the agenda for forging linkages between education reformers in the US and in India focused on improving learning outcomes for children. The program was part of a multi-year effort to strengthen the linkages between education reformers in both the US, India and other countries working to improve educational outcomes at a systemic level. Entrepreneurs who are working at the community level, private philanthropists funding innovation and research and the academics performing this research met to establish a framework for learning and building innovative structures. A central tension in our discussions was: how to achieve excellent learning outcomes at a level of scale that impacts millions of children; how do we balance “excellence” with the pressing need “to scale”?

 

An Overview of India’s Educational Landscape

Overview – Karthik Murlidharan, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of California, San Diego

India’s educational system is failing its children, and the implications for economic development are significant. In the past ten years Government of India spending on education has grown and the results are discouraging; while enrollment levels have improved, students’ learning outcomes are dismal. What are the structural changes that might improve learning in both the public sponsored schools and the private sector ones? How do we frame and sequence the social investment to accomplish this?

 

What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?

Moderator – Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of International Education and Director of Global Education and of International Education Policy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

Panel: Abhijit Banerjee, MIT, Abdul Latif Jamal Poverty Action Lab; Ashish Dhawan, CEO and Founder, Central Square Foundation and Felipe Barrera-Osorio, Assistant Professor of Education and Economics, Harvard Graduate School of Education

What evidence do we have, and what evidence do we need to generate to inform the design and content of this social investment strategy. Educators in India have worked on many levels and across many frontiers to promote improved learning outcomes. Non – profit service providers and philanthropic groups have developed a myriad of interventions; what works and what doesn’t? Looking ahead, where do we need to place our investments to generate the insights and findings that will influence policy makers? Are there important lessons from outside of India that can be applied?

 

What Are the Critical Questions We Can Discern from the US Education Reform Movement?

Moderator – Tarun Khanna, Director, South Asia Institute, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Panel: Tom Haslett, Central Square Foundation; Stig Leschly, CEO, Match Education; Jacqueline Bhabha, Executive Director Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies

The education reform movements outside of India have taken different directions and each offers some insight to efforts in India. The US offers many such important lessons for the emerging education reform movement in India. As we consider the past 20 years here in the US, can we apply “lessons learned” to the Indian context? What are the critical questions that we should pursue?:

What is more important “excellence” or “scale” in program? What is the best application of philanthropic capital: research, pilot stage intervention or scaling programs with promise? How do you support advocacy efforts? If you could restart education reform in the US with 20 years of perspective, what would you do differently?

 


Film Screening: Little Zizou and Q&A with director Sooni Taraporevala

START
Sat, Oct 27, 2012 at 02:00pm

END
Sat, Oct 27, 2012 at 04:00pm

VENUE
Harvard Film Archive

ADDRESS
Harvard Film Archive
Carpenter Center
Harvard University

Join internationally acclaimed filmmaker Sooni Taraporevala for a screening of her film and Q&A afterwards, as part of an ongoing exhibit at the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts of her photography, Parsis: The Zoroastrians of India (Oct. 25 – Dec. 20).

 

Little Zizou is a comedy for all ages. It is the rambunctious and moving story of how two battling Bombay families finally come to terms. In the spirit of Federico Fellini, with just a hint of Mel Brooks, Little Zizou presents characters who show us the necessity of love and the possibility of grace. This excerpt taken from movie’s official website; read more here.

This event is cosponsored with the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, with generous support from the Tata Group.




Citizenship and Its Discontents

START
Mon, Sep 23, 2013 at 12:30pm

END
Mon, Sep 23, 2013 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Harvard South Asia Institute Book Talk

Niraja Jayal, Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Chair: Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Citizenship and Its Discontents explores a century of contestations over citizenship from the colonial period to the present, analyzing evolving conceptions of citizenship as legal status, as rights, and as identity. The early optimism that a new India could be fashioned out of an unequal and diverse society led to a formally inclusive legal membership, an impulse to social and economic rights, and group-differentiated citizenship. Today, these policies to create a civic community of equals are losing support in a climate of social intolerance and weak solidarity. Once seen by Western political scientists as an anomaly, India today is a site where every major theoretical debate about citizenship is being enacted in practice, and one that no global discussion of the subject can afford to ignore.



Chaat / SAI Welcome Back Party

START
Fri, Sep 28, 2012 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Sep 28, 2012 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South Concourse
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South Concourse
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard students and faculty, start the school year off right with SAI’s Chaat Party! Meet representatives from student groups across Harvard that focus on South Asia, learn about SAI’s internship and funding opportunities, and enjoy delicious South Asia food!


Boot Polish

START
Sun, Sep 9, 2012 at 04:00pm

END
Sun, Sep 9, 2012 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Harvard Film Archive

ADDRESS
Harvard Film Archive
Carpenter Center
Harvard University

RAJ KAPOOR FILM SERIES presented by:
SOUTH ASIA INITIATIVE AND THE HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE

Directed by Raj Kapoor, India, 1953

A tear-jerking neorealist tale in the mold of Vittorio De Sica’s ShoeshineBoot Polish follows an orphaned brother and sister who are forced by their horrid aunt to beg on the streets, until their lives are torn apart by the monsoon.


Bobby

START
Mon, Sep 10, 2012 at 07:00pm

END
Mon, Sep 10, 2012 at 09:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

RAJ KAPOOR FILM SERIES presented by:
SOUTH ASIA INITIATIVE AND THE HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE

Directed by Raj Kapoor, India, 1973

Raj Kapoor’s charming paean to youth, starring his son Rishi, follows a young couple who hit the road pursued by a zany horde of bounty hunting bandits.