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SAI Events Archive

Bangladesh at 50: Looking Back, Looking Forward

START
Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 07:00am

END
Thu, Mar 4, 2021 at 11:00am

VENUE
Webinar

Wednesday, March 3, 2021: 7:00 AM EST – 11:00 AM EST // 6:00 PM BST – 10:00 PM BST 
Thursday, March 4, 2021: 7:00 AM EST – 11:00 AM EST // 6:00 PM BST – 10:00 PM BST
Register here to receive the Zoom link to both days of the conference.
Livestream Day 1 (Wednesday, March 3) on YouTube
Livestream Day 2 (Thursday, March 4) on YouTube

Bangladesh gained independence from Pakistan in 1971. To mark 50 years of Bangladesh’s independence, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University is holding virtual conference on March 3 and 4, 2021. The conference will highlight the arc of Bangladesh’s history from the Language Movement through the Liberation War to the present – and the future.

Panelists will discuss a wide range of topics, including the remarkable economic and human development of independent Bangladesh and the important role of civil society in its development. This arc will be traced and analyzed through a set of panel presentations by leading Bangladeshi scholars and activists moderated by international scholars who have worked on and in Bangladesh.  

 

To view the agenda for both days and the panelists who will be speaking at the event, click here.

Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

START
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 05:00pm

VENUE
Webinar

Registration required for this event: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ANpdh_VUTvKvpvWk4AbGGA

Speaker: Andrew B. Liu, Assistant Professor of History, Villanova University

Tea remains the world’s most popular commercial drink today, and at the turn of the twentieth century, it represented the largest export industry of both China and colonial India. In analyzing the global competition between Chinese and Indian tea, Andrew B. Liu challenges past economic histories premised on the technical “divergence” between the West and the Rest, arguing instead that seemingly traditional technologies and practices were central to modern capital accumulation across Asia. He shows how competitive pressures compelled Chinese merchants to adopt abstract industrial conceptions of time, while colonial planters in India pushed for labor indenture laws to support factory-style tea plantations. Characterizations of China and India as premodern backwaters, he explains, were themselves the historical result of new notions of political economy adopted by Chinese and Indian nationalists, who discovered that these abstract ideas corresponded to concrete social changes in their local surroundings. Together, these stories point toward a more flexible and globally oriented conceptualization of the history of capitalism in China and India.

Andrew B. Liu is assistant professor of history at Villanova University, where his research focuses on China, transnational Asia, political economy, and comparative history.

This event is hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by The Mittal Institute and The Joint Center for History and Economics, Harvard University.

Policing and Gendered Cases in India

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Nirvikar Jassal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on gender, sexual violence, ethnic conflict and hate crime, and policing with a regional focus on South Asia. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Asian Survey and Journal of Asian Studies. He completed his PhD from the University of California—Berkeley in 2020, and previously worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and New York City government.

Reimagining India’s Health System: The Lancet Citizens’ Commission at Harvard

START
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 09:00am

END
Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 10:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/98490180275
Stream via YouTube: https://youtu.be/xJoNzXrky6k

9:00 AM–10:15 AM ET // 7:30–8:45 PM IST

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral initiative to lay out the path to universal health coverage in India. Its guiding principle is that structural change toward universal health coverage can only be achieved through consultative and participatory engagement with the diverse sectors involved in healthcare and, most importantly, with India’s citizenry.

This event aims to introduce the Commission to the Harvard community and invite students, researchers, faculty, and alumni to participate in the initiative. It will consist of a panel discussion featuring several of the Commission’s co-chairs and commissioners, who are leading voices from across India’s healthcare landscape. They will discuss the Commission’s five work streams (citizens’ engagement, financing, governance, human resources, and technology) and ways to get involved.

Those interested in participating in the Commission are encouraged to fill out this survey. For more on the Commission, please read the launch commentary in the Lancet and visit the Commission website.

Moderator
  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University
Panelists
  • Yamini Aiyar, President and Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research
  • Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson, Biocon Ltd.
  • Poonam Muttreja, Executive Director, Population Foundation of India
  • Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School; Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Co-founder, Sangath
  • Sharad Sharma, Co-founder, iSPIRT Foundation
  • S.V. Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard University
  • Rajani Ved, Former Executive Director, National Health Systems Resource Centre

This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Club of India, the Harvard Club of Mumbai, the Harvard Business School Club of India, the Harvard Club of Bengaluru, The Harvard Business School India Research Center, and the Harvard T.H. Chan India Research Center.

Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.

Why Do Indians Shun Science?

START
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 08:00am

END
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

8:00 AM ET // 6:30 PM IST
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/imxGZh0NkCk
Add to Google Calendar: http://shorturl.at/dxyCR

It might be odd to aver that Indians shun science — in a country that is lauded as a fount of software engineering, has just touched the heavens with Mangalyaan, and will likely make most of the vaccines for the world.  But, the fact remains that India dramatically underinvests in science, to its detriment. Perhaps worse, we seem to eschew a scientific mindset to promote instead a variety of other modes of reasoning: parochial concerns, religious sentiment, and tradition.

While these have their place, in this talk Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of the Mittal Institute, will illustrate the costs of our apparent science-phobia by briefly discussing benefits of higher scientific literacy which we could tap into in three disparate Indian settings: the moribund market for jobs among youth, a polluted environment, and crumbling art and architectural heritage. To be clear, this is not a diatribe against the humanities and the social sciences, but rather it is an attempt to direct attention to a costly societal myopia. 

——————

Tarun Khanna is the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of Harvard University’s Lakshmi Mittal & Family South Asia Institute. For over 25 years, he has studied entrepreneurship as a means of economic development. He currently teaches courses related to creativity in emerging economies. An online version, Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, one of Harvard’s most popular, has been taken by ~600,000 students in over 200 countries. A recent book, Trust, and an earlier one, Billions of Entrepreneurs, chronicle creative ventures in China, India and beyond.

In 2007, he was nominated to be a Young Global Leader (under 40) by the World Economic Forum. In 2009, he was elected a Fellow of the Academy of International Business. In 2016, he was recognized by the Academy of Management as Eminent Scholar for Lifetime Achievement in the field of International Management. The Government of India appointed him to lead several national committees connected to entrepreneurship and higher education. In 2020, he was asked by The Lancet, the world’s leading medical journal, to co-chair a commission to re-imagine the future of India’s health system.

Outside Harvard, he serves on the boards of the Washington-based global power company, AES Corporation, the global adtech company and India’s first unicorn, InMobi, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, PRS India, a non-profit dedicated to India’s parliamentary governance, is a cofounder of Axilor, a Bangalore-based incubator, and of several ventures across the developing world.

Art and Science of Heritage Conservation: Finding the Right Balance, Part 2

START
Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 10:15am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92896152942
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/ekNo4vZwkLA

6:00–7:15 AM PT // 9:00 AM–10:15 AM ET // 7:00–8:15 PM PKT // 7:30–8:45 PM IST // 8:00–9:45 PM BST

This event is the second in a 2-part series. View Part 1 here.

As part of the Mittal Institute’s Program for Conservation of Culture, this webinar will focus on the status of art conservation science in South Asia today. The panelists will explore how to develop and carry out a leading art conservation science program in South Asia.

This event is co-hosted by the Mittal Institute and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, India. 

Moderator

  • Anupam Sah, Head of Art Conservation, Research, and Training, CSVMS, Mumbai

Speakers

  • Vinod Daniel, Board Member of International Council of Museums and Chairman of AusHeritage
  • Anusha Kasthuriarachchi, Department of Archaeology, Colombo
  • Jinah Kim, Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University
  • Bijaya Kumar Shahi, Founder Chairperson, ICOM, Nepal;
  • Manager Singh, Director General, National Research Laboratory for Conservation of Cultural Property, Lucknow
  • Sharada Srinivasan, Professor, School of Humanities, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru

To add this event to your iCalendar, click here: https://bit.ly/2UsQRCA

 

Reimagining India’s Health System: A Lancet Citizens’ Commission

START
Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 06:30am

END
Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 07:30am

VENUE
Webinar

Join via YouTube Live: https://bit.ly/rihslaunch 

 

The Lancet Citizens’ Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System is an ambitious, cross-sectoral endeavor to lay out the roadmap to achieving universal health coveragefor the people of India. The Lancet is a leading international medical journal that has paved the way for medical reforms and global health discussions around the world.The Commission on Reimagining India’s Health System will be the first participatory report of its kind to be published by the journal.

A guiding principle for this Commission is that structural change towards UHC can only be attained through consultative and participatory engagement with the diverse sectors involved in healthcare and, most importantly, with India’s citizenry. The Commission has already brought together leaders from academia, the scientific community, civil society, and private healthcare to spearhead this effort. We now aim to go beyond the traditional boundaries of expertise to actively engage stakeholders whose voices have rarely been heard in previous reports: those who deliver healthcare and those who receive it. We envision our efforts be underpinned by a Citizens’ Commission, an unprecedented attempt to gather insights from across the country through grassroots surveys, public consultations, and online discussions.

The launch event on December 11th aims to formally announce the Lancet Citizens’ Commission to the public. It will consist of a panel discussion among three leading voices in healthcare, followed by a conversation among co-chairs, commissioners and the public on the Commission’s aim and the Indian health system more broadly.

Co-Chairs

  • Tarun Khanna, Director, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University
  • Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson, Biocon Ltd. 
  • Vikram Patel, Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School
  • Gagandeep Kang, Professor, Christian Medical College, Vellore

Speakers

  • Pamela Das, Senior Executive Editor, The Lancet
  • K. Vijay Raghavan, Principal Scientific Advisor, GoI
  • Soumya Swaminathan, Chief Scientist, WHO
  • V.K. Paul, Member, NITI Aayog

Art and Science of Heritage Conservation: Finding the Right Balance, Part 1

START
Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 11:00am

END
Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 12:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Join via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92896152942
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/sr9oSHiX62I

8:00–9:15 AM PT // 11:00 AM–12:15 PM ET // 9:00–10:15 PM PKT // 9:30–10:45 PM IST // 10:00–11:45 PM BST

This event is the first in a 2-part series. View Part 2 here.

As part of the Mittal Institute’s Program for Conservation of Culture, this webinar will focus on recent developments in science and the impact of these developments on the field of art conservation. It will also delve into the current understanding about materials and techniques in the conservation of antiquities. 

This event is co-hosted by the Mittal Institute and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, India. 

Moderator

Panelists

  • Alison Heritage, Project Manager, Strategic Planning and Research, International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), Rome
  • Narayan Khandekar, Director, Straus Conservation Center, Harvard Art Museums
  • Austin Nevin, Head of Department of Conservation, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • Stefan Simon, Director, Rathgen Research Laboratory, Staatliche Museen, Berlin

To add this event to your iCalendar, click here: https://bit.ly/2UsQRCA

 

Business, Voters, and Distributive Politics in Developing Democracies

START
Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Dec 4, 2020

VENUE
Webinar

Register for the event: https://bit.ly/32yhBGS

Gautam Nair, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, will explore the impact of business on developing democracies and inequality.

Gautam Nair is a a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he is a faculty affiliate of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and the Center for International Development. His research is in comparative and international political economy, and focuses primarily on the politics of democracy and redistribution. He has been published in The Journal of Politics and International Organization. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Leitner Political Economy Program at Yale.

This seminar series is co-sponsored by the Watson Institute at Brown University, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

More Info: http://southasianpolitics.net/