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SAI Events Archive

2019 Summer Grants Open House

START
Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

The Mittal Institute’s summer student grant applications for 2019 are now open. If you’re a Harvard undergraduate or graduate student looking to fund your researchinternship, or language study in South Asia this summer, the deadline to apply for a grant is February 8. Come hear about The Mittal Institute’s funding opportunities for Summer 2019.

At our Open House, you can get all of your questions answered about the grants and the application process. Join us to learn more and enjoy some delicious South Asian food. RSVP to our event on Facebook!

Please note: This opportunity is only available to current Harvard students.

Preparing Young Indian Scientists for Life Sciences in the 21st Century

START
Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 05:00pm

The landscape of life sciences — biology, biomedicine, biotech, and all the rest — is rapidly changing. Today, the amount of data produced is massive, and it increases exponentially with time. New techniques are invented every week as existing techniques get cheaper, though there are new ethical and moral concerns about playing with life processes. Physical and mathematical sciences are increasingly integrated into the life sciences, and exciting new career options are developing as academic positions get more competitive.

Life science research is at the heart of nearly every economic sector. But how do budding life scientists navigate all of these issues, and what can they do to prepare for the future? In this panel discussion, a group of distinguished life scientists and policymakers will discuss some of these issues and offer their guidance.

This program is delivered in coordination with Harvard Global Research Support Centre India

Please RSVP: mittalinstitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu

Hinduism in Nepal: The Ritual Dimension

START
Sun, Jan 20, 2019 at 10:00am

END
Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 05:00pm

As part of the Nepal Studies ProgramProfessor Michael Witzel will lead a conference titled “Hinduism in Nepal: The Ritual Dimension.” Ritual has played a major role in Hindu societies, from the Vedas to modern times, and it has been particularly prominent in Nepalese society. It accompanies individuals from morning until night, from birth to death, and it shapes the customs of society throughout the year. This conference will explore some of the rituals, past and present, that are typical for Nepal. Stress is put on the extensive documentation that has been carried out over the past few decades. This conference will focus mainly on fire rituals, including Agnihotra, Homa, and more.

This conference is hosted with the support of the Nepal Leadership Academy (NLA). NLA builds leadership capacity in young change-agents—who are guided by the shared values of collaborating, innovating, and serving and the shared principles of community, justice, and sustainability—to architect effective policy, business, and civic solutions that tackle the most grueling adaptive challenges.

The reception on January 21 is provided by Himalayan Children’s Charities. Through quality education and mentorship, this organization provides the under-served youth of Nepal the pathways to become the next generation of professionals, leaders, and change makers.

Symposium: Trace: Artisanal Intelligence, Material Agency, and Ritual Technology in South Asian Art

START
Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Sat, Dec 8, 2018

The ‘material turn’ in art history opened new avenues for research with fresh approaches that shift our attention from considering an object as a static thing in an absolute state to putting more emphasis on the process of making and its use and reuse. A chipped area in a miniature painting is no longer an unfortunate loss but a site of excavation for information about material conditions of production and use, while unfinished surface in a stone sculpture provides a laboratory to explore artisans’ hands at work. This symposium brings together scholars whose research embraces methodological interventions and theoretical implications of art history’s material turn in the field of South Asian art and architecture, mostly focusing on the period between 500 CE and 1500CE.  Thematically organized, papers demonstrate how attending to thingness and the process of making helps reveal hitherto invisible connections across time and space.  Going beyond the rubric of material agency, papers also explore the importance of considering somatic intelligence and ritual technology that developed to activate power and sacrality of objects and buildings in Indic religious contexts. Further consideration of ritual knowledge helps situate the trace of time left in matter through artistic mediations in historical and experiential contexts.

Symposium organizer: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, Harvard University

Keynote Speaker: Vidya Dehejia, Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Columbia University

Urbanization Seminar: Mrinalini Rajagopalan

START
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of History of Art & Architecture, University of Pittsburgh, is a historian of India’s built environment and is particularly interested in the impact of colonialism and nationalism on the architectural, urban, and preservation cultures of modern South Asia. Her first monograph Building Histories: The Archival and Affective Lives of Five Monuments in Modern Delhi (University of Chicago Press, 2016) traces the modern lives of five medieval monuments in India’s capital city, Delhi, and brings attention to their contested histories, unexpected uses, and ideological appropriations by state and non-state actors. This book received the Alice Davis Hitchcock Award from the Society of Architectural Historians in 2018.

She is currently developing two new research projects. The first traces the built works of Begum Samru—a wealthy dowager who rose from modest beginnings as a dancing girl to become the independent ruler of a prosperous territory in nineteenth-century North India. The second, and more ambitious project, investigates the various architectural products built, commissioned, and patronized by the Tata Corporation during India’s long twentieth-century transformation from a European colony to a socialist nation and most recently to an economically-liberal state eager to participate in global markets.

Transcultural Attractions: American Photographs of an Indian Dancer

START
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

AJAY SINHA, Professor of Art History, Mount Holyoke College

Chair: JINAH KIMGardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture and Faculty Director, Arts @ Mittal Institute

In the Spring of 1938, an Indian dancer, Ram Gopal, posed in a variety of fantastical costumes for the American photographer, Carl Van Vechten, in New York City. Studying over 100 large-size photographs resulting from the photoshoot, the lecture builds an illustrated story of their mutual fascination and exchange, triggered by the camera. The remarkable images, now part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, Yale University, show traces of the myriad, transcultural relations being performed during the photoshoot. They reveal an interplay of differing investments in the image when we ask:  What does the Indian dancer show the camera;  what does the American photographer see through his lens?  Their visual exploration helps us elaborate on an underrepresented history of exchanges between the cultural worlds of India and the U.S. in early-20th century.

Urban Resilience Asia Pacific Conference 2018

START
Wed, Nov 7, 2018

END
Thu, Nov 8, 2018

While urbanisation brings unprecedented social and economic opportunity, it also increases the threat of disasters, with greater concentrations of people living in dangerous places, such as those living in coastal areas, on land that floods, or on marginalised land.

Asia Pacific is one of the world’s fastest urbanising regions. It is also home to the largest number of people living in low-income settlements. The region is susceptible to a wide range of natural hazards, including flood, windstorms, earthquake, volcano, tsunami and landslide. Climate change is also expected to contribute to sea level rise, stronger windstorms and higher temperatures, increasing urban risk and exacerbating migration.

To address this, Sustainable Development Goal 11 has identified resilience as a key approach for creating inclusive, safe and sustainable cities.

This two-day conference invites practitioners, researchers and decision-makers from all disciplines to present, discuss, debate and recommend realizable social, physical, political and economic measures that build resilience in the Asia Pacific region. The guiding question is, how can vulnerable, low-income neighborhoods in fast-growing cities in the Asia Pacific region become more resilient to disasters and climate change?

For more information or to register, please visit https://www.urap2018.com/registration-2/

 

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

START
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Join Vijayendra Rao in a seminar discussing his paper “Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Analysis of Indian Village Assemblies” (Co-authored with R. Parthasarathy and N. Palaniswamy).

Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, a Lead Economist in the Research Department of the World Bank, integrates his training in economics with theories and methods from anthropology, sociology and political science to study the social, cultural, and political context of extreme poverty in developing countries.

He leads the Social Observatory, an inter-disciplinary effort to improve the conversation between citizens and governments. It does this – first – by improving the quality of civic action by strengthening forums for deliberation and developing tools to facilitate collective action, and – second – by building the “adaptive capacity” of large-scale anti-poverty projects;  i.e. the ability of projects to make everyday decisions, and modify project design, on the basis of high-quality descriptive, evaluative and process-oriented information.

His research has spanned a wide variety of subjects including participatory development, deliberative democracy, the rise in dowries in India, the determinants and consequences of domestic violence, the economics of sex work, public celebrations, and culture and development policy.

 

The paper he will be discussing during this seminar can be accessed here

Center for Government & International Studies Trick or Treat!

START
Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST   Free

VENUE
CGIS Knafel Concourse

ADDRESS
CGIS Knafel Concourse
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Explore the globe this Halloween!

  • Visit the international centers in CGIS South and CGIS Knafel (1730 and 1737 Cambridge Street)
  • Learn more about programs and funding opportunities
  • Enjoy some delicious holiday treats

 

Participating centers: Asia Center, Center for African Studies, Committee on Regional Studies East Asia, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, History Department, Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Korea Institute, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Visiting Artist Program Lecture

START
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute’s Visiting Artist Fellowship (VAF) is an eight-week research fellowship at Harvard that connects artists from South Asia to Harvard’s intellectual resources. The Fellowship provides a platform for conducting independent research that explores critical issues in South Asia through the lens of art and design. The program welcomes applications from mid-career artists in South Asia to come to Harvard University to participate in interdisciplinary discourse with students and faculty on global issues relevant to South Asia.

In this lecture, these fellows will discuss the work they have created over the past year, and comment on their experience during their time in Cambridge.

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