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SAI Event Topic : Education

The State and the Market in the Delivery of Primary Education in India: Theory and Evidence

START
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 02:30pm

END
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 04:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel K031

ADDRESS
CGIS Knafel K031
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Education Seminar

Karthik Muralidharan, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of California, San Diego

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Cosponsored with the Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics (Brown Watson Institute, Harvard Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and MIT Center for International Studies)


Educators for Teaching India Conference

START
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 04:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Women in India: Negotiating Tradition and Modernity

Keynote Speaker: Harleen Singh, Associate Professor of Literature, Women’s and Gender Studies, and South Asian Studies, Brandeis University
Closing speaker: Tarun KhannaJorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of the Harvard South Asia Institute

 

Established in 2008, Educators for Teaching India (EFTI) is a group of secondary school educators dedicated to deepening our own knowledge of India and to exploring India’s role in school curricula. The organization includes teachers in public and private schools as well as educators in supporting academic institutions.

Read more about the conference here.

Sponsored by:
Educators for Teaching India in conjunction with The Winsor School, Phillips Academy and The Groton School. For more information and to register visit: http://www.teachingindia.org/


India Changing: Searching and Supporting Innovation Insurgents

START
Tue, Oct 22, 2013 at 03:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 22, 2013 at 04:00pm

VENUE
Harvard Kennedy School, T-301, Taubman Building (Third Floor)

ADDRESS
Harvard Kennedy School
T-301, Taubman Building (Third Floor)
79 John F. Kennedy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Professor Anil Gupta, founder of the Honey Bee Network, will deliver a talk titled “India Changing: searching and supporting innovation insurgents.” The talk will focus on the ecosystem of inclusive innovations emerging in India, with global implications. There will be examples from five focii of innovations: children, tech students, informal sector, professionals and public systems.


Attaining Education for All : How do India and China compare?

START
Fri, Oct 4, 2013 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 4, 2013 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Education Seminar

Abhimanyu Singh, Director and Representative, UNESCO Office Beijing
Discussant: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Cosponsored with the Asia Center Modern Asia Seminar

While much international attention has been paid to the recent rapid rise of China and India in  economic terms, there has been relatively little focus on their efforts in the equally critical domain of developing human capabilities through the provision of basic education and adult literacy. China and India both emerged as sovereign nations in the mid-twentieth century with roughly comparable levels of literacy but have since followed distinctive approaches to education.This talk will examine and compare the progress and identify challenges in these domains  within the framework of Education for All (EFA), a  global agenda launched at Jomtien   in 1990 and reaffirmed in Dakar in 2000.

Abhimanyu Singh is Director of the UNESCO Office Beijing and UNESCO Representative to the PRC, DRK, Japan, Mongolia and the Republic of Korea. From 2006 to 2008, Singh served as Director of the UNESCO Office in Abuja, Nigeria. From 2001 to 2006 he led the global coordination and monitoring of the Education for All (EFA) movement at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris. From 1974-2000, as a member of the Indian Administrative Service (IAS), the premier civil service of the country, Singh held key leadership positions at various levels of National and Provincial Governments. He chaired the global drafting committee at the World Education Forum at Dakar in 2000.As a mid-career professional he was a Hubert Humphrey Fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, USA

Lunch will be served.



The Rebirth of Education

START
Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Education Seminar Series

Lant Pritchett, Professor of the Practice of International Development, Harvard Kennedy School
Discussant: Akshay ManglaAssistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School 


Cosponsored with the International Education Policy program at Harvard Graduate School of Education

Despite great progress around the world in getting more kids into schools, too many leave without even the most basic skills. In India’s rural Andhra Pradesh, for instance, only about one in twenty children in fifth grade can perform basic arithmetic. The problem is that schooling is not the same as learning. In  his new book The Rebirth of Education, Lant Pritchett uses two metaphors from nature to explain why. The first draws on Ori Brafman and Rod Beckstrom’s book about the difference between centralized and decentralized organizations, The Starfish and the Spider. Schools systems tend be centralized and suffer from the limitations inherent in top-down designs. The second metaphor is the concept of isomorphic mimicry. Pritchett argues that many developing countries superficially imitate systems that were successful in other nations— much as a nonpoisonous snake or butterfly mimics the look of a poisonous one.

Pritchett argues that the solution is to allow functional systems to evolve locally out of an environment pressured for success. Such an ecosystem needs to be open to variety and experimentation, locally operated, and flexibly financed. The only main cost is ceding control; the reward would be the rebirth of education suited for today’s world.






Educators for Teaching India Conference

START
Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 03:00pm

Democracy in India: Past Present Future

Keynote Speaker:
Ananya Vajpeyi, Author of Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India,
Associate Fellow, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi,
Senior, American Institute of Indian Studies

Sponsored by:
Educators for Teaching India in conjunction with The Winsor School, Phillips Academy and The Groton SchoolFor more information and to register: http://www.teachingindia.org/For more information about this event, click here.


Education Reform Measures in India: Lessons from the World

START
Wed, May 8, 2013 at 02:45pm

END
Wed, May 8, 2013 at 07:15pm

VENUE
Inn at Harvard

ADDRESS
Inn at Harvard
1201 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

On May 8, the South Asia Institute at Harvard University (SAI) and the Central Square Foundation (CSF) convened a group of high-level stakeholders for a roundtable discussion to shape and commit on the agenda for forging linkages between education reformers in the US and in India focused on improving learning outcomes for children. The program was part of a multi-year effort to strengthen the linkages between education reformers in both the US, India and other countries working to improve educational outcomes at a systemic level. Entrepreneurs who are working at the community level, private philanthropists funding innovation and research and the academics performing this research met to establish a framework for learning and building innovative structures. A central tension in our discussions was: how to achieve excellent learning outcomes at a level of scale that impacts millions of children; how do we balance “excellence” with the pressing need “to scale”?

 

An Overview of India’s Educational Landscape

Overview – Karthik Murlidharan, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of California, San Diego

India’s educational system is failing its children, and the implications for economic development are significant. In the past ten years Government of India spending on education has grown and the results are discouraging; while enrollment levels have improved, students’ learning outcomes are dismal. What are the structural changes that might improve learning in both the public sponsored schools and the private sector ones? How do we frame and sequence the social investment to accomplish this?

 

What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?

Moderator – Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of International Education and Director of Global Education and of International Education Policy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

Panel: Abhijit Banerjee, MIT, Abdul Latif Jamal Poverty Action Lab; Ashish Dhawan, CEO and Founder, Central Square Foundation and Felipe Barrera-Osorio, Assistant Professor of Education and Economics, Harvard Graduate School of Education

What evidence do we have, and what evidence do we need to generate to inform the design and content of this social investment strategy. Educators in India have worked on many levels and across many frontiers to promote improved learning outcomes. Non – profit service providers and philanthropic groups have developed a myriad of interventions; what works and what doesn’t? Looking ahead, where do we need to place our investments to generate the insights and findings that will influence policy makers? Are there important lessons from outside of India that can be applied?

 

What Are the Critical Questions We Can Discern from the US Education Reform Movement?

Moderator – Tarun Khanna, Director, South Asia Institute, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Panel: Tom Haslett, Central Square Foundation; Stig Leschly, CEO, Match Education; Jacqueline Bhabha, Executive Director Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies

The education reform movements outside of India have taken different directions and each offers some insight to efforts in India. The US offers many such important lessons for the emerging education reform movement in India. As we consider the past 20 years here in the US, can we apply “lessons learned” to the Indian context? What are the critical questions that we should pursue?:

What is more important “excellence” or “scale” in program? What is the best application of philanthropic capital: research, pilot stage intervention or scaling programs with promise? How do you support advocacy efforts? If you could restart education reform in the US with 20 years of perspective, what would you do differently?