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SAI Event Topic : Special Event

Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

SAI Visiting Artist Meenakshi Sengupta will lead an interactive art performance during the tea break.


Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.


Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Nov 9, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Nov 9, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.


Getting Better: Stories from KEM Hospital and GS Medical College, India

START
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 07:00pm

VENUE
14 Story Street, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
Cambridge, MA

Student Event

Join us for a film screening, dinner, & discussion with Gulserene Dastur, the filmmaker, & Dr. David Jones, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine

“The Hospital that never turns anyone away”: A 2200 bed, state-run hospital which treats 1.7 million people a year – overcrowded, used and abused, KEM Hospital is the last resort for the destitute. On an average day, the hospital admits 230 in-patients, treats 560 emergency patients, operates on 150 patients, and sees 5800 out-patients. “Getting Better” was born out of 2 years of extensive research and 4 years of shooting, and is a snapshot into a system where “nothing is easy, but nothing is impossible.”

Cosponsored with the Harvard Global Health Institute


Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 26, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

*Please note the change in time


The Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean

START
Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 10:00am

END
Sat, Oct 15, 2016 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Special Event

The interregional arena of the Indian Ocean has emerged as a connected—if not unified—field of historical study. While the case for integration had been strongly suggested by historical scholarship since the 1980s on the pre-colonial and early modern periods, comparisons and connections across the Indian Ocean in the colonial and modern eras have been a major feature of historical studies in the twenty-first century. Histories of this rich and complex arena of human interaction have taken the form of books, monographs, and research articles. These works have explored and explained important historical webs of relationships—social, economic, cultural, and political—that bound together the peoples of South Asia, Middle East, East and South Africa, and Southeast and East Asia. In so doing, scholars have transcended rigid area studies boundaries and crossed colonial and national borders in creative ways. While earlier works had focused on trade, newer studies have innovatively blended the aspects of culture and political economy.

In light of the efflorescence of work on a region of both historical and contemporary importance, Sugata Bose and Sunil Amrith have taken on the task of bringing together the best historians of the Indian Ocean to offer a grand synthesis of the scholarship of the past few decades in a two-volume The Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, under contract to Cambridge University Press. Sugata Bose is the general editor of the project, and Sunil Amrith is one of the editors of the second volume. They are joined by Engseng Ho and Tansen Sen (volume 1) and Isabel Hofmeyr (volume 2). The conference will play a pivotal role in a major scholarly endeavor, allowing the editors to hone their overview and conceptualization of the volume as a whole, while providing vital feedback to individual authors.

Learn more at the conference website.

Cosponsored with the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the Asia Center


Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

*Please note the change in time


Hackathon 2016

START
Sat, Oct 15, 2016

END
Sun, Oct 16, 2016

VENUE
Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, MA

ADDRESS
Harvard Kennedy School
Cambridge, MA

Student Event

Pakathon Boston is partnering with SAI, the Harvard Pakistan Student’s Group, and the HKS Pakistan Caucus this year to organize its annual ‘hackathon.’

Teams will work to create a solution for a social issue in Pakistan and work on a business plan to implement this solution. They’ve put together an amazing program; anyone who is passionate about using technology and business to address problems in developing countries should definitely attend.

More details and registration is here: pakhackathon2016.eventbrite.com

For those interesting in returning to Pakistan and starting their own ventures this is a no brainer (Pakathon has a wide network of investors and incubators as well as their own official Returner’s Program ) but even for others this would be a great networking and skill building opportunity – students and professionals from all over New England are coming, so this will be a great chance to meet like-minded people you would not have crossed paths with otherwise.

Teams with Harvard affiliates will also get a chance to compete in Harvard South Asia Institute’s Seed for Change: Pakistan competition ($7,500 prize) in May 2017!


India and Japan, India and China

START
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

Tarun Das,  former Director-General and Chief Mentor of the Confederation of Indian Industries

Chair:  Professor Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Cosponsored with the Asia Center Seminar Series, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, and the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University


Weekly Tea Break

START
Wed, Oct 12, 2016 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 12, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
CGIS South, 4th Floor
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

*Please note the change in time


Research Methods Talk: Using Corpus Analysis to Study Media Discourse: Comparing Discussions of Islamic Marriage Reform in India and Pakistan

START
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Cosponsored Event

Sharon Tai, Research Editor, SHARIAsource

Ali Hashmi, MIT Media Lab Research Affiliate (2015-2016) and SHARIAsource Editor/Data Scientist

Osama Siddique, Henry J. Steiner Visiting Professor in Human Rights, Harvard Law School, Law and Policy Research Network

This talk focuses on using corpus analysis as a research method. Media discourse on legislative issues provides a rich source for deriving research questions. This talk asks for feedback on the development of a new corpus analysis tool that is being used to analyze and compare how contemporary media in India and Pakistan is shaping discourse about issues of marriage reform and Islamic law. The tool uses source corpora from Media Cloud, which is a collaborative project between the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Osama Siddique, Harvard Law School, will be a respondent to the panel by giving feedback on how the tool could be used, improved, and further developed from his experience as a scholar, lawyer, and social scientist.

Cosponsored with ILSP: SHARIAsource at Harvard Law School

Light refreshments will be provided

*Please note the change in location.


Stories of Democracy in India

START
Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Film Screenings

Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Abhijit Banerjee, Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

Screening of Mandir, masjid, mandal and Marx: Democracy in India (45 minutes)

The film, by Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University, tells the story of the interaction of the people and their elected representatives in the plains carved out by India’s great river – the Ganga – flowing through three strategic states – Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal. Filmed in the course of a 1000-mile journey from Delhi to Calcutta during the turbulent general elections of 1991, it provides a rare glimpse into the role of religion, caste and communism in India’s democratic politics.

Screening of The strange case of the water that went up the great-grandfather’s arse and other stories of democracy by Abhijit Banerjee

Democracy is humanity’s bravest experiment. The idea that everyone–women and men, poor and rich, illiterate and educated–should be in charge of shaping the state and society they live in, is at once totally obvious and deeply radical. And yet, the lived experience of democracy is almost always disappointing. Corruption is often the rule and change is slow and difficult.

This film is about living this tension, through the eyes and voices of every day participants in the world’s largest democracy, India. Using unique footage that we shot in dozens of locations all over the country over eight years, with interviews with everyone from theorists to thugs (who are sometimes the same people), we document how profoundly the so-called bit-players in the democratic narrative—the often semi-literate voters, the local activists and the small-time leaders–have absorbed the democratic ethos. For all their cynicism and fear, it is for the poor, the marginalized and the powerless that the idea of democracy matters the most, what gives them the greatest hope for the future.

Combining animation, folk music and street plays with casual conversations at street corners, expert analyses and stump speeches, this is a documentary about a nation, a people and one extraordinary idea.