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SAI Event Type : Lecture


Building a Leading Institution for Research and Education: Insights from Harvard University

START
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 08:00pm

This seminar will focus on recent trends within higher education across the world, and how these trends present opportunities and challenges at Harvard University and similar institutions internationally. Professor Mark C. Elliott, Vice Provost for International Affairs and Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History at Harvard University, will share examples of Harvard’s global engagement and how it supports the University’s standing as a world-class institution of research and education.

This seminar is delivered in coordination with Harvard Global Research Support Centre India. 

Refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to mittalinstitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu. 

 


Pakistan’s Youth and the Welfare State: Bilawal Bhutto

START
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 07:15pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Join us for a conversation with Bilawal Bhutto, Chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party, on Pakistan’s youth and the welfare state. The conversation will be chaired by Mariam Chughtai, Babar Ali Fellow of the Mittal Institute and Associate Dean and Assistant Professor at LUMS Syed Ahsan Ali and Syed Maratib Ali School of Education, Pakistan.

This event is a collaboration between the Mittal Institute and the Harvard Pakistan Student Group.


The First Battlefield of Western Nuclear Competition: India and Light Water Reactors, 1955–1963

START
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

This event is co-hosted by the Asia Center and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.

As part of the Asia Center’s Science and Technology Seminar Series, Professor Jayita Sarkar of the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University will discuss nuclear policy in India.

After President Eisenhower’s 1953 “Atoms for Peace” proposal at the United Nations General Assembly, U.S. technological superiority in nuclear technologies became a powerful tool of U.S. foreign policy in the form of civil nuclear assistance. American light water reactor sales were offered to Western Europe, Asia and elsewhere under Section 123 of the 1954 U.S. Atomic Energy Act, thereby, making General Electric, Westinghouse, Babcock & Wilcox and Combustion Engineering the major reactor suppliers in the world. Both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations were anxious about the impact of an imminent Chinese nuclear weapons test on non-Communist and non-aligned India.

Policymakers in Washington, therefore, decided that the best chance of stalling Indian nuclear proliferation was to offer American power reactors that could help demonstrate the peaceful nuclear capability of the democratic Asian country, in sharp contrast to the military capability of the authoritarian Chinese communist state. Moreover, U.S. reactors would allow U.S. access and oversight on India’s nuclear program through safeguards. This led to the first bilateral reactor agreement between the United States and India leading to U.S. supply of two light water reactors built in Tarapur.

Notwithstanding the Indian Atomic Energy Commission’s opposition to safeguards, its chairman Homi J. Bhabha accepted the US offer because of the generous financial package that it accompanied, thereby, beating the offer of reactors without safeguards from the French Commissariat a l’emergie atomique. After India’s 1974 nuclear explosion, the US supplied light water reactors became tools of U.S. nonproliferation policy toward the Indian Atomic Energy Commission.

Victor Seow, Assistant Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, will chair this lecture. 


De Facto Suffrage: A Field Experiment to Improve Women’s Turnout in Pakistan’s General Elections

START
Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 12, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Sarah Khan, Postgraduate Associate, Yale MacMillan Center

Sarah Khan is a postgraduate associate at the Yale MacMillan Center. Her research interests lie at the intersection of gender and comparative politics, with a regional specialization in South Asia. In her work, she explores gender gaps in political preferences, and the barriers to women’s participation and substantive representation in Pakistan. Additionally, she explores questions related to the prevention of violence against women. Her research has been generously supported by grants from the American Institute of Pakistan Studies, the Abdul Jameel Poverty Action Lab (JPAL) Governance Initiative, and the National Science Foundation.

Khan has worked with Ali Cheema, Shandana Mohmand, and Asad Liaqat to research potential pathways to increasing women’s voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, culminating in a paper entitled “Exercising Her Right: Civic and Political Action as Pathways for Increasing Women’s Turnout in Pakistan.” According to the team, “there is a large and persistent gender gap in voter registration and turnout in Pakistan, making for a heavily male-skewed electorate in all levels of Pakistani elections. This has implications both for the quality of democracy, and for women’s substantive representation in politics.”


Crisis and Credibility: The Politics of Ideas in India and Developing Democracies

START
Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 8, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S450

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S450
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Dr. Bilal A. Baloch is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science & Economics and a Lecturer and Regional Director in South Asia, Middle East and North Africa at The Joseph H. Lauder Institute, Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania.

At CASI, Bilal focuses on the political economy of government behavior in India and other developing democracies. Here, he is revising his doctoral dissertation, Crisis, Credibility, and Corruption: How Ideas and Institutions Shape Government Behavior in India, into a monograph. Bilal has presented academic papers at several international conferences, including the annual meetings of the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. In addition to his scholarly publications, his commentary has appeared in a number of outlets, including: The GuardianForeign Policy, The Washington Post, and The Hindu. (Source)

In this lecture, Bilal will go beyond the claim that ideas matter in Indian politics, and will identify which set of ideas, as well as how these ideas shape political behavior during a credibility crisis. He will examine two main credibility crisis moments in contemporary Indian history: that which led to the declaration of an internal emergency and suspension of civil liberties by the ruling Congress government in 1974-1975; and the crisis milieu which led to policy paralysis within the UPA government in 2011-2012. This argument draws upon over 120 interviews with state elites, including prime ministers, cabinet ministers, party leaders, senior bureaucrats, and others.


Gender, Violence and Vulnerabilities of Adolescents in India

START
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 07:30pm

As part of our ongoing India Seminar Series, we are partnering with the Center on Gender Equity and Health, UC San Diego for a talk titled, ‘Gender, Violence and Vulnerabilities of Adolescents in India’ by Dr. Anita Raj, Tata Chancellor Professor of Medicine, Director of Center on Gender Equity & Health (Department of Medicine), UC San Diego. Dr. Raj will present research on adolescent risk for early marriage, family violence and sexual assault, and the role these have on mental health concerns for both adolescent girls and boys. Policy and program implications based on these findings will be discussed.

To RSVP write to mittalinsitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu and confirm your presence at the event.

 


The Emerging Markets Technological Revolution: Financial Inclusion & Development Through Digitization

START
Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 05:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 07:00pm

Nadeem Hussain, founder of Telenor Microfinance Bank, is globally recognized for his dedication and service to financial inclusion. He has chaired the United Nation’s MDG Session on Financial Inclusion, is a frequent speaker at international forums on branchless banking and microfinance, and has held numerous board and committee positions in the sector. He will discuss the technological revolution taking place across emerging markets, analogous to the 19th century Industrial Revolution in the West in terms of the transformational impact on development and society.

Chair: Asim KhwajaSumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard University 


The Great Indian Migration Wave

START
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST   Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Join visiting scholar Chinmay Tumbe and moderator Ian Talbot for a discussion about the great Indian Migration wave.  In this seminar, Tumbe provides an overview of his book, India Moving: A History of Migration, that attempts to explain when, how and why people have moved to, from and within the subcontinent over centuries. It reveals one of the world’s largest, longest and on-going episodes of labour migration, referred to as the Great Indian Migration Wave, and its significance in modern Indian history. It provides a new perspective on the migration of business communities both within and outside India. It shows how 25 million people who trace their roots to India in the past three centuries, were dispersed across the world from Japan to Jamaica and why internal diasporas matter as much as international diasporas. It documents the mass migrations caused by multiple Partitions, refugee crises and other displacements in Indian history and their disproportionate impact on particular communities. And finally, it provides a perspective on migration and development, in history and in 21st century India.

Chinmay Tumbe is faculty member of the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad and the 2018 Alfred D. Chandler Jr International Visiting Scholar in Business History at Harvard Business School. He works on migration, cities, firms and history. He chairs the IIMA Archives initiative and coordinates the History Internship series at IIMA. An alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science and the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, he has been a faculty member at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyderabad and was the 2013 Jean Monnet Fellow at the Migration Policy Centre, European University Institute, Florence, Italy. He has published widely on migration for a decade and has served on policymaking groups.


Art and Science of the Forbes Pigment Collection | Color and Pigments in Indian Painting

START
Thu, Aug 9, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Aug 9, 2018

VENUE
CSMVS Museum, Mumbai

ADDRESS
CSMVS Museum, Mumbai
159-161 Mahatma Gandhi Road
Fort, Mumbai - 400023, Maharashtra, India


VENUE
Visitors' Centre Auditorium

Please join us for this two-part lecture cosponsored by Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) and supported by Jai & Sugandha Hiremath – Hikal Ltd. An invitation to this event may be found here

 

Art and Science of the Forbes Pigment Collection by Narayan Khandekar

Dr Narayan Khandekar tells us about the Forbes Pigment Collection. It will cover the reasons why Edward Waldo Forbes started collecting pigments, how the collection grew, new additions to the collection and how it is used now by using case studies from the activities of the Straus Centre for Conservation and Technical Studies.

Narayan Khandekar leads the Strauss Center’s conservation and research activities, as well as those for the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art. Specializing in the scientific analysis of paintings and painted surfaces, he has published extensively on the subject. He curates the Forbes Pigment Collection and the Gettens Collection of Binding Media and Varnishes.

Color and Pigments in Indian Painting by Jinah Kim

How blue is Krishna? Does the Sankrit term “kṛṣṇa” mean blue? Color experience is highly subjective, and color terms pose semiotic challenges. A fluid semantic range in Sanskrit makes it even more challenging to identify which color a color term denotes. Here, the data gleaned from scientific analysis of pigments and the study of material and physical aspects of paintings as objects can help unpack the role of artists in shaping the way we see color. Identifying pigments in use in Indian miniature painting and reading them in close comparison with the colors discussed in theoretical texts and artistic treatises, afford us a glimpse into artists’ intimate, embodied knowledge of each color’s material properties.  This talk will demonstrate how efforts to contextualize the analytical data on pigments with art historical questions can help advance our understanding of color and pigments in the history of painting beyond a matter of confirmation of a pigment’s use.

Jinah Kim is the Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture. Professor Kim’s research and teaching interests cover a broad range of topics with special interests in intertextuality of text-image relationship, art and politics, female representations and patronage, issues regarding re-appropriation of sacred objects, and post-colonial discourse in the field of South and Southeast Asian Art.

 

 


South Asia Without Borders Seminar: Citizenship of the Outcastes

START
Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:00pm

END
Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 02:00pm

The panel will discuss conceptions of “citizenship” in India as related to caste and indigeneity. The discussion will be an opportunity to explore the ways that citizenship and belonging have been constructed through exclusion and marginalization based on social, political, and ethnic lines.

Rajyashri Goody, Visiting Artist, The Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Suraj Yengde, W.E.B. Du Bois Nonresident fellow, Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University; Research Associate, Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Raile Rocky Ziipao, Arvind Raghunathan and Sribala Subramanian South Asia Visiting Fellow, The Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Moderator: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Lunch will be provided.

Co-sponsored by the Committee on Ethnicity Migration and Rights (EMR) and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.


B4 Valedictory Event in Bangalore

START
Sat, Dec 23, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Sat, Dec 23, 2017 at 05:00pm

B4’s intensive two-week workshop on Genomic Applications in Healthcare & Translational Research will culminate in a valedictory event featuring a key note by Dr. VijayRaghavan (Secretary of Department of Biotechnology, India.)


Kudiyattam Lecture

START
Wed, Nov 8, 2017 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Nov 8, 2017 at 04:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Dean Shulman of Hebrew University will be discussing Kudiyattam, the last living performance tradition of Sanskrit theater in the world. Kudiyattam is recognized by Unesco as a “masterpiece of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity.”