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SAI Event Type : Talk


“Practically No Habitation”: The Yanadi Community and the Colonial Violence of Spaceflight

START
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 01:15pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

SPEAKER: Asif Siddiqi, Professor of History, Fordham University

The Indian state’s broken pacts with Indigenous communities, the so-called ‘scheduled tribes’ or Adivasi, resulted in massive displacements in the name of environmental, territorial, and infrastructural sovereignty, yet none have given rise to such troubling paradoxes as those implemented to build rocket launch sites. To make way for a new space center in Andhra Pradesh, in 1970, the government of India forcibly removed and resettled a large population of Yanadi people. More than fifty years later, the profound and permanent disruptions caused by this dislocation continue to reverberate in the deep social and economic precarity of the Yanadi. I recover this story as a starting point to highlight two broader intersecting frames. The first positions India’s emergent technoscientific projects in the decades after independence as reproducing certain forms of violence redolent of colonial science. The second finds echoes of such violence in infrastructural entanglements across the world in places like Algeria, Kenya, California, Kazakhstan, the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and elsewhere. I argue that the violence of displacement, dislocation, and damage, accompanied by local resistance, were not appendices to the long history of spaceflight but fundamental to it, as space activities unfolded through deeply colonial-minded practices. Moreover, I argue that such initiatives functioned squarely within the modernist aspirations of individual states, the international scientific community, and often, ordinary people, activated by the desires and promise that space exploration invoked.

Asif Siddiqi is Professor of History at Fordham University, where he works on the global history of science and technology in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Science and Technology in Asia Seminar Series is sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and convened by Victor Seow, Assistant Professor of History of Science.


A Strong Handoff in U.S.-India Relations

START
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 10:30am

END
Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 11:45am

VENUE
Webinar

Register here for the talk. 

Please join the Future of Diplomacy Project for a conversation with Kenneth I. Juster, former U.S. Ambassador to India and HKS alumnus, about the U.S.-India relationship.

Ambassador Juster will discuss major achievements in the U.S.-India partnership in the areas of diplomacy, defense, economic relations, energy, and health over the past four years as well as issues on the horizon such as the rise of China and trade policy. Dean of Harvard Kennedy School, Doug Elmendorf, will introduce Ambassador Juster, and Faculty Chair, Nicholas Burns will moderate this discussion.

Please register in advance for this meeting here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Visit the Future of Diplomacy Project website for full event details. 


Identifying Core Values in Research and Leadership: An Open Conversation with Professor Kristin Fabbe and Dr. Rana el Kaliouby

START
Mon, Mar 15, 2021 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 15, 2021

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Professor Kristin Fabbe of the Harvard Business School, and Dr. Rana el Kaliouby, CEO and co-founder of Affectiva, will engage prospective Crossroads Emerging Leaders Program students in an open session on identifying core values as the foundation for effective leadership.

 


Weapons of the Weak: The Violent Consequences of Biased Technological Change

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 11:00am

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 12:30pm

VENUE
Webinar

Register here to join the webinar.

Aditya Dasgupta is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He completed his PhD at Harvard University and was previously a postdoc at Stanford University.

Dasgupta’s research is in comparative politics, political economy, and political-economic history/development. He works in three areas: (i) the political economy of democratization; (ii) the role of technological change in political development; (iii) the development of state capacity. Much of his work is on rural India, including his book project on the political consequences of the green revolution. Dasgupta is also building a lab on the political economy of agriculture and rural societies (PEARS).

His articles appear in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Economic History, and International Organization and have received awards from the APSA Democracy and Autocracy and Science, Technology and Environmental Politics sections.


Why Do Indians Shun Science?

START
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 08:00am

END
Sat, Dec 19, 2020 at 09:30am

VENUE
Webinar

8:00 AM ET // 6:30 PM IST
Join via YouTube: https://youtu.be/imxGZh0NkCk
Add to Google Calendar: http://shorturl.at/dxyCR

It might be odd to aver that Indians shun science — in a country that is lauded as a fount of software engineering, has just touched the heavens with Mangalyaan, and will likely make most of the vaccines for the world.  But, the fact remains that India dramatically underinvests in science, to its detriment. Perhaps worse, we seem to eschew a scientific mindset to promote instead a variety of other modes of reasoning: parochial concerns, religious sentiment, and tradition.

While these have their place, in this talk Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of the Mittal Institute, will illustrate the costs of our apparent science-phobia by briefly discussing benefits of higher scientific literacy which we could tap into in three disparate Indian settings: the moribund market for jobs among youth, a polluted environment, and crumbling art and architectural heritage. To be clear, this is not a diatribe against the humanities and the social sciences, but rather it is an attempt to direct attention to a costly societal myopia. 

——————

Tarun Khanna is the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School and Director of Harvard University’s Lakshmi Mittal & Family South Asia Institute. For over 25 years, he has studied entrepreneurship as a means of economic development. He currently teaches courses related to creativity in emerging economies. An online version, Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, one of Harvard’s most popular, has been taken by ~600,000 students in over 200 countries. A recent book, Trust, and an earlier one, Billions of Entrepreneurs, chronicle creative ventures in China, India and beyond.

In 2007, he was nominated to be a Young Global Leader (under 40) by the World Economic Forum. In 2009, he was elected a Fellow of the Academy of International Business. In 2016, he was recognized by the Academy of Management as Eminent Scholar for Lifetime Achievement in the field of International Management. The Government of India appointed him to lead several national committees connected to entrepreneurship and higher education. In 2020, he was asked by The Lancet, the world’s leading medical journal, to co-chair a commission to re-imagine the future of India’s health system.

Outside Harvard, he serves on the boards of the Washington-based global power company, AES Corporation, the global adtech company and India’s first unicorn, InMobi, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, PRS India, a non-profit dedicated to India’s parliamentary governance, is a cofounder of Axilor, a Bangalore-based incubator, and of several ventures across the developing world.


Swaraj: Dadabhai Naoroji and the Birth of Indian Nationalism

START
Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 09:00am

END
Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 10:00am

9:00–10:00 AM EST // 6:30–7:30 PM IST // 6:00–7:00 PM PKT // 7:00–8:00 PM BST

Venue: Virtual via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/91387696938 

This event will also be streamed LIVE on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mittalinstitute.newdelhi/ 

Moderator

  • Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History, Harvard University

Speaker

  • Dinyar Patel, Assistant Professor, S.P. Jain Institute of Management and Research

In 1906, Dadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917) declared swaraj, or Indian self-government, as the goal of the Indian National Congress. This talk will examine how Naoroji developed the idea of swaraj during his five decades-long political and nationalist career, which included groundbreaking economic research on Indian poverty, engagement with emancipatory movements around the world, and becoming the first-ever Asian elected to the British Parliament. Naoroji’s swaraj, as we will see, was global in nature. It evolved from contact with European liberalism and socialism and, at the same time, had a significant influence on the growth of global anti-colonialism and antiracism.


Growing the World’s Largest NGO: BRAC, Bangladesh, and Beyond

START
Fri, Mar 6, 2020 at 12:30pm

END
Fri, Mar 6, 2020 at 02:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Founded in 1972, BRAC has become one of the largest and most successful NGOs in the world. Dr. Muhammad Musa, Executive Director of BRAC International, will discuss the efforts that go into making BRAC a success, and explore the organization’s vision to continue expanding in Bangladesh and around the world.

Lunch will be provided.

Speaker

  • Muhammad Musa, Executive Director, BRAC International

Moderator

  • Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Faculty Director, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute

Citizenship in Crisis: The Anti-CAA Protests and the Future of India

START
Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 05:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

The panelists will discuss India’s recent legislation on citizenship and what it means for the nation’s future.

This event is hosted by the Harvard University Asia Center and co-sponsored by the Mittal Institute.

Speakers:

  • Suraj Yengde, Dalit scholar, activist, and postdoctoral fellow, Harvard Kennedy School
  • Esha Meher, Lawyer, Supreme Court of India
  • Hemanth Bharatha Chakravarthy, Sophomore, Harvard College

Moderator:

  • Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Citizenship: History, Policy, and Protests

START
Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 05:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium S010
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

In South Asia, the current debate around issues of citizenship has ignited divisions and unrest; however, the roots of these issues stretch back much further. This interdisciplinary panel will explore the post-Partition history of citizenship in the region, legal and constitutional developments, and the issues at play on both sides of recent legislation and counter-movements.

Panelists

  • Sana Aiyar, Associate Professor of History, MIT
  • Kalyani Ramnath, Prize Fellow in Economics, History, and Politics, Harvard University
  • Sahana Ghosh, Postdoctoral Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Brown University
  • Suchitra Vijayan, Founder and Executive Director, The Polis Project

Moderator

  • Rohit De, Associate Professor, Yale University

Related Reading

Ashu Varshney gives testimony at USCIRF Hearing on Citizenship Laws and Religious Freedom

 


Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

START
Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 08:30pm

“Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World”, an event jointly organized by The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and the Harvard Global Health Institute and presented in New Delhi, examined the connections between human, animal and environmental health, and the response to disease outbreaks in India.


Trauma and Memory: Healing Through Art

START
Sat, Nov 3, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Sat, Nov 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Lalit Kala Akademi Regional Centre

ADDRESS
Lalit Kala Akademi Regional Centre
GARHI, East of Kailash
New Delhi - 110065

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University hosted a special talk as part of its Artist Talk: India Seminar Series. The talk titled “Trauma and Memory: Healing through Art” by Kabi Raj Lama – a Nepal based artist and Visiting Artist Fellow at Harvard University retraced the artist’s personal life story involving art, natural disasters and trauma.

The talk looked at the artist’s journey and experience with mental health after two direct encounters confronting traumatic natural disasters: the 2011 Tsunami in Japan and the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal. Lama talked about his experience and survival stories from the Tsunami and earthquake, and a following realisation that mental health is often ignored in the process of rebuilding after such disasters.


Can Science Make Sense of Life? The Politics of CRISPR Regulation

START
Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 06:00pm

VENUE
C-Camp, LH1, Bengaluru

ADDRESS
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-CAMP)
UAS-GKVK Campus, Bellary Road,
Bengaluru 560 065, Karnataka, India

Since the discovery of the structure of DNA and the birth of the genetic age, a powerful vocabulary has emerged to express science’s growing command over the matter of life. Armed with knowledge of the code that governs all living things, biology and biotechnology are poised to edit, even rewrite, the texts of life to correct nature’s mistakes. Yet, how far should the capacity to manipulate what life is at the molecular level authorize science to define what life is for? This book looks at flashpoints in law, politics, ethics, and culture to argue that science’s promises of perfectibility have gone too far. Science may have editorial control over the material elements of life, but it does not supersede the languages of sense-making that have helped define human values across millennia: the meanings of autonomy, integrity, and privacy; the bonds of kinship, family, and society; and the place of humans in nature.

Prof. Sheila Jasanoff
Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies,
Harvard Kennedy School

Moderator: Jahnavi Phalkey
Director, Science Gallery Bengaluru

The event is a collaborative effort by Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platforms, Science Gallery Bengaluru and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University.