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SAI Event Type : Talk


India Science Festival 2020

START
Sat, Jan 11, 2020 at 10:30am

END
Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 06:45pm

The beginning of 2020 will mark a massive celebration of science and technology with the India Science Fest, which aims to bridge the gap between science and society. This extravaganza is a non-profit initiative to help youth engage with the latest in science from across the world, fueling curiosity and demystifying the scientific career path. Aspiring Minds, an Indian-born global assessments leader, is a lead organizer of the Festival in association with the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard University, the primary academic partner for the event.


Breaking the Mould: Girl Power and Beyond in Contemporary India

START
Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 03:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 06:00pm

Jacqueline Bhabha (Professor, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health) will be in conversation with Neha J Hiranandani to discuss her book Girl Power: Indian Women Who Broke the Rules. The discussion will focus on the challenges young women still face when it comes to access to education and health while negotiating with the societal expectations. Keeping in with the theme of Neha Hiranandani’s Girl Power – a book about bringing forth the stories of ‘rebel women’ in India – it will ponder on the factors that contribute to the success of many who do break the mould, against the odds.


Fractal Urbanization: Spatial Segregation in Liberalizing India

START
Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 08:00pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
India International Centre
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India

Speaker: Naveen Bharathi, Mittal Institute Raghunathan Family Fellow, 2019-2020

Moderator: Satish Deshpande, Professor of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics

This presentation will show how residential caste-segregation is independent of city size, using the first-ever large-scale evidence of neighborhood-resolution data from 147 of the largest cities in contemporary India. Bharathi will discuss one of the central conundrums in Indian urbanism — the persistence of caste segregation across the country, and across cities of varying sizes. This finding punctures a hole in one of the central normative promises of India’s urbanization: the gradual withering of traditional caste-based segregation. The talk will provide further fine-grained evidence on the ghettoization of the most spatially marginalized groups in urban India: Muslims and Dalits.


The Past, Present and Potential Future of Coal in India

START
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

India’s coal industry is highly contested today. Between the immediacy of coal shortages, the transition to renewable energy, and air pollution problems, the long history of the coal industry and India’s deep economic and social dependence on the fuel gets lost in conversation. In this talk, Rohit will give a brief historical sketch of the Indian coal industry, and discuss some of the reasons why Coal India as both a company and a developmental actor has persisted, and is likely to persist in the near future. In particular, he will discuss the political and financial adaptations of the Indian coal industry since its nationalization in the early 1970s and some of the characteristics which differentiate it from other PSUs.

 


Primary Health Care Reforms in India: Field Lessons from Early Implementation

START
Thu, Dec 5, 2019 at 05:30pm

END
Thu, Dec 5, 2019 at 07:00pm

Location: Kresge G3, HSPH, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA

Rajani R. Ved is the Executive Director of National Health Systems Resource Centre in India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and a Visiting Scientist at HSPH. For over ten years, she led the establishment and institutionalization of India’s ASHA community health worker program. Currently, she is leading the design and implementation support for India’s primary health care initiative, Ayushman Bharat Health and Wellness Centers.

Speaker: Dr. Rajani R. Ved, Executive Director, National Health Systems Resource Center, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India

Moderator: Bhargav Krishna, Doctoral Candidate in Public Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Adjunct Faculty, Public Health Foundation of India

This event is co-sponsored with the South Asian Students Association at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.


Until the Lions: Echoes from the Mahabharata Book Talk

START
Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Speaker: Karthika Naïr, Author and Poet

Moderator: Parimal Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Harvard University

In Until the Lions, Karthika Naïr retells the Mahabharata through the embodied voices of women and marginal characters, so often conquered and destroyed throughout history. She captures the richness and complexity of the Mahabharata, while illuminating lives buried beneath the edifices of one of the world’s most venerated books — revealing the most intimate threads of desire, greed, and sacrifice.


Fractal Urbanization: Spatial Segregation in Liberalizing India

START
Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Speaker: Naveen Bharathi, Mittal Institute Raghunathan Family Fellow, 2019-2020

Moderator: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

This presentation will show how residential caste-segregation is independent of city size, using the first-ever large-scale evidence of neighborhood-resolution data from 147 of the largest cities in contemporary India. Bharathi will discuss one of the central conundrums in Indian urbanism — the persistence of caste segregation across the country, and across cities of varying sizes. This finding punctures a hole in one of the central normative promises of India’s urbanization: the gradual withering of traditional caste-based segregation. The talk will provide further fine-grained evidence on the ghettoization of the most spatially marginalized groups in urban India: Muslims and Dalits.

Poster image: Photo: Mahesh Bhat from the book Bengaluru/Bangalore – In First Person Singular


Between the Yogi and the Commissar

START
Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 04:15pm

END
Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 05:45pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Between the Yogi and the Commissar: Imagining De-Colonial Science in Postcolonial India, c. 1952–1977

Projit Bihari Mukharji, Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Moderated by Victor Seow, Assistant Professor, Department of History of Science, Harvard University

For the generation of political leaders who took charge of the newly independent Indian state in 1947, the world seemed to ripen for renewal. They had brought a mighty empire to its knees, and now sought to build a new nation, where science would play a key role. But what was “science”? What ends should it pursue? And how did its work relate to that of statecraft? These were some of the questions they explored.

Most of the scholarship on science in the newly independent Indian republic has focused on “Nehruvian science.” But Nehru was far from being the only influential postcolonial politician to be interested in science and its role in nation-building. This talk will explore a very different set of engagements between science, postcolonial statecraft, and the quest for a de-colonial future through the history of parapsychology in northern India.

This event is sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and co-sponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.


Shareholder Cities: Land Transformations Along Urban Corridors in India

START
Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Economic corridors — ambitious infrastructural development projects throughout Asia and Africa — are dramatically redefining the shape of urbanization. As these corridors cut across croplands, the conversion of agricultural lands into new urban uses has erupted in volatile land conflicts. This talk will focus on urbanization along the first economic corridor built in India, the Mumbai-Pune Expressway.

Speakers:
Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Bish Sanyal, Ford International Professor of Urban Development and Planning, Director of the Special Program in Urban and Regional Studies/Humphrey Fellows Program, MIT
Patrick Heller, Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Susan Fainstein, Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow in Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Moderator:
Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design



Tools for Urban Conservation in Lucknow: Advocacy, Politics, and Civic Engagement

START
Mon, Oct 28, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 28, 2019 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Urban conservation is often a pressing challenge in historic Indian cities experiencing the pressures of development. Many cities, often lacking any viable local-level policy and enforcement, have resorted to alternative tools, often citizen-led, to accomplish the goal of conservation. This seminar will explore the tools of advocacy, politics, and civic engagement through recent examples from the city of Lucknow in northern India.


Royal City Invented: Mysore in the 20th Century

START
Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

After the 1880s, Mysore was established as the home of the royal family. Despite its interrupted and uncertain status as a “capital” city, it became the site of an experiment in ornamentalism by the 20th century. It was among the first cities in India to have a City Improvement Trust in 1903, a few years after the Bombay Improvement Trust was set up in 1898. In the Trust’s negotiations with the municipality on the one hand, and the Palace establishment on the other, we see a specific form of material and temporal “ordering” that drew as much on the sovereign power of the monarch — though mediated by an increasingly powerful bureaucracy — as on a creative adaptation of the diverse forces, techniques, and devices more properly associated with “governmentality.” How does the invention of Royal Mysore challenge existing conceptions of the colonial city as a site of modernity?

Speaker:

Janaki Nair, Professor of History, Jawaharlal Nehru University