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SAI Event Region : Pakistan


Voters and Foreign Policy: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Pakistan

START
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Christopher ClaryPostdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University

In traditional surveys in Pakistan, the vast majority of respondents identify India as an enemy and a serious threat to Pakistan. Do these beliefs affect voter choices? In a novel survey experiment, we find that voters punish politicians who advocate a friendly policy toward India, but only modestly. Candidate attitudes toward India were the least meaningful characteristic for voter choice among five characteristics tested.

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.


Summer Grant Opportunities Open House

START
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Come hear about SAI Summer Funding opportunities, including research and internship grants, and ask any last minute questions about the application process.

Deadline to apply: February 17, 2016

Join the Facebook event.


Mental Health in Disaster Response – Local and International Perspectives

START
Wed, Dec 16, 2015 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Dec 16, 2015 at 08:00pm

The Aman Foundation and the Harvard University South Asia Institute have co-sponsored this conference on mental health in the wake of natural and manmade disasters in Pakistan.

Coping in the Wake of Disasters: Long term Effects of Traumatic “Life-Changing” Situations

Sharmeen Khan, Clinical Psychologist

Sharmeen Khan is a Karachi-based mental health professional and a human rights activist. She has successfully run various campaigns to provide relief at several disasters from the earthquake of 2005 to the earthquake of 2015, as well as other natural and manmade disasters both in Pakistan and abroad. She spearheaded the Naya Jeevan initiative of providing psychological help to survivors of the Army Public School, Peshawar attack. Sharmeen is currently working towards completing a PhD in Disaster Psychology at the University of Karachi.

Panel Discussion:

Dr. Ruth Barron, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Director of Outpatient Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Dr. Mihir Bhatt, Founder and Director, All India Disaster Management Institute

Dr. Jennifer Leaning, FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, T.H. Chan Harvard School of Public Health; Director FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard University

Dr. Ayesha Mian, Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

Dr. Junaid Razzak, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Former CEO, AMAN Healthcare Services

This event will be followed by an invitation-only roundtable discussion from the 17th-18th of December 2015 with key stakeholders in mental health and disaster management in Pakistan. If you are interested in participating in this discussion, please send an email with a 250 word bio about yourself to: shajia_sarfraz@mail.harvard.edu


Beyond the Madrassa: Investigating the Civic Infrastructure of Islamist Groups in an Urban Setting

START
Thu, Nov 5, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 5, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Laila Bushra, Babar Ali Fellow, South Asia Institute

Chair: Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Over the last three decades, Islamic educational institutions (madrassas) operating in Pakistan have witnessed a dramatic expansion in their numbers and geographical scope. Being more than simply the breeding grounds for militant groups and ideologies, madrassas are internally diverse and dynamic institutions. Using the urban milieu of Lahore as the framework, Bushra uses the term ‘Islamist civic infrastructure’ to analyze the vast array of functions and activities that madrassas perform in collaboration with other entities, both religious and secular. These include educational institutions of several types, publications and publishing houses, student and professional organizations, religious merchandise, and regular meetings and rituals. This infrastructure has a well-defined internal hierarchy, and has penetrated evermore arenas of social activity over time. The ideological and cultural reach of this civic Islamic component is arguably even more influential and resilient than the militant component usually associated with ‘jihad’.

Click here to read a summary of the event.


The Capitals of Postcolonial Pakistan: Urbanism as a discourse of Territorial Selfhood

START
Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Urbanization Seminar

Farhan Karim, Assistant Professor The University of Kansas, School of Architecture, Design, and Planning

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

In the two decades following the creation of Pakistan, the government embarked on a lofty project to establish Muslim nationalism as a two pronged symbol: a binding factor for the country’s culturally different east and west wings and a liberating force for the emerging Third World. A major focus of the project was to establish a new executive capital in West Pakistan—Islamabad (established 1959), and a provincial citadel capital in East Pakistan—Sher-e-Bangla Nagar. These two new capitals were conceived as the backdrop to accommodate the new quintessential democratic institutions: parliament buildings, universities, education training centers and polytechnic institutes. However, Pakistan’s shortage of architects and urban planners, in tandem with the country’s martial government’s Cold War leaning towards the Unite States, eventually compelled the government to seek technical assistance from USAID and the Ford Foundation, and commissioned Constantine Doxiadis and Louis Kahn to design Islamabad and Sher-e-Bangla Nagar respectively. The main challenge in designing the two capitals, though they varied significantly in scale, was to establish the new urban setting as the spatial means to manifest and foster a sense of postcolonial selfhood, Muslim nationalism, citizenship, and economic developmentalism. The other concurrent urban design projects in Pakistan, such as Korangi located southeast of Karachi and the largest slum clearance and urban rehabilitation project of its time, complemented the efforts of establishing new capitals by promoting urban space as an apparatus or a spatial armature to transform the placeless and stateless Muslim selfhood into legitimate citizens. Through a critical discussion of different urban design aspects of these two capitals the proposed talk will show that the discursive formation of urban design in postcolonial Pakistan was entangled with the newly anointed citizenship, territoriality and the idea of a composite Muslim self. Urban design was deployed as a metaphor, if not a means to display and exercise the new Pakistani government’s authoritative power, that symbolizes the aspiration of postcolonial identity and selfhood in a complex way.


Challenges to Pakistan’s Tortuous Path to Democracy and Good Governance

START
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Oct 2, 2015

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Cosponsored Event

Ajmal Qureshi, Senior Fellow, Harvard University Asia Center

Discussant: Laila BushraBabar Ali Fellow, South Asia Institute

Cosponsored with the Modern Asia and Fellows Seminar Series, Asia Center


Reflections: A Conversation with Salim and Sulaiman Merchant

START
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Thompson Room
Barker Center

ADDRESS
Thompson Room
Barker Center
12 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Read a summary of the event here.

Salim and Sulaiman Merchant, Musicians and composers

Moderator: Ali AsaniProfessor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

The Merchant brothers, Salim and Sulaiman, rank among the most dynamic and talented musicians and composers in South Asia today. The breadth and range of their musical ability attests to their intrinsic genius: from award winning musical scores and compositions in Indian and American cinema to collaborations with some of the most talented and ground-breaking musicians of our times.  Salim and Sulaiman will reflect on their musical careers and some of their widely acclaimed compositions inspired by Islam’s rich tradition of spirituality and artistic expression.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program


Using Cell Phones to Study Behavior: From Individuals to Entire Nations

START
Tue, Sep 15, 2015 at 08:30am

END
Tue, Sep 15, 2015 at 10:00am

Webinar

Watch the live stream here.

JP Onnela, Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health

Cell phones are no longer just a tool of communication – they are being used to improve the lives of billions of people. As the technology continues to improve, collecting behavioral data is getting easier and less intrusive. Data from cell phones can reveal everything from an individual’s mental health, how pathogens spread, to how social networks function at the societal level. In this session, Professor Onnela will discuss his work on using digital phenotyping to study the behavior of social networks with big data.

8:30 AM in Cambridge, 5:30 PM in Pakistan, 6 PM in India, 6 PM in Sri Lanka, 6:30 PM in Bangladesh, 6:15PM in Nepal

How to participate:

WATCH: One the day of the webinar, watch live on SAI’s website
INTERACT: Tweet your questions and join the conversation on Facebook

Twitter@HarvardSAI, #SAIWebinar
FacebookHarvardSAI
Email: sainit@fas.harvard.edu


South Asia Week 2015: Ambassador Husain Haqqani – Pakistan and US: Dealing with Divergent Interests?

START
Thu, Apr 30, 2015 at 08:30am

END
Thu, Apr 30, 2015 at 10:00am

VENUE
Allison Dining Room, Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Taubman Building
79 John F. Kennedy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Ambassador Husain Haqqani examines the tenuous relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan in a seminar co-sponsored by the India and South Asia Program.

A Hudson Institute Senior Fellow and Director for South and Central Asia, Ambassador Husain Haqqani served as Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States from 2008-2011 and is widely credited with managing a difficult partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. His distinguished career in government includes serving as an advisor to four Pakistani Prime ministers, Yusuf Raza Gilani, Benazir Bhutto, Nawaz Sharif and Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi. He also served as Pakistan’s Ambassador to Sri Lanka in 1992-93.

Ambassador Haqqani’s 2005 book “Pakistan Between Mosque and Military” has been praised in major international journals and newspapers as a path-breaking book on Pakistan’s political history. The book received favorable reviews in Foreign Affairs, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, and academic journals and has sold more copies than any other academic book on Pakistan in the last decade.

Ambassador Haqqani is the Director of the Center of International Relations, and a Professor of the Practice of International Relations at Boston University. His specializations include: Diplomacy, Muslim Political Movements, International Journalism, Intercultural Relations, South Asia, Central Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle-East, and U.S.-Pakistan Relations.

Cosponsored with the Future of Diplomacy Project, Harvard Kennedy School


South Asia Week 2015: A Moment of Opportunity for U.S. Engagement in Afghanistan and Pakistan

START
Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Malkin Penthouse, Littauer Building 4th Floor

ADDRESS
Malkin Penthouse
Littauer Building 4th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School

Ambassador Daniel Feldman, U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, discusses U.S. engagement in the region in a seminar co-sponsored by the India and South Asia Program and the South Asia Initiative at Harvard University.

Daniel F. Feldman is the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP) with the personal rank of Ambassador. He has served in the S/SRAP office since its creation in 2009, first as deputy and then as principal deputy to Ambassadors Richard Holbrooke, Marc Grossman, and James Dobbins. Ambassador Feldman has been deeply engaged in all aspects of U.S. policy formulation and implementation for both countries, including overseeing political transition issues, economic growth initiatives, regional integration efforts, international engagement with key partners, strategic communications, and Congressional outreach. For his service in the S/SRAP office, he was awarded the Secretary’s Distinguished Honor Award by Secretary Clinton.

Before reentering government, he was a law partner and co-chair of the international Corporate Social Responsibility group at Foley Hoag LLP, the only such legal practice in the U.S. His previous government experience includes serving as Director of Multilateral and Humanitarian Affairs at the National Security Council in the Clinton Administration, and as Counsel and Communications Adviser to the U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

Ambassador Feldman was Senior Foreign Policy and National Security Advisor to the Kerry presidential campaign in 2004, communications advisor and recount attorney for the Gore campaign in 2000, and a senior campaign advisor to Senator Mark Warner. He helped to found, and subsequently served on the board of, the National Security Network, and is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has been appointed a White House Fellow and a Henry Luce Scholar, and was a law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and on the South African Supreme (Constitutional) Court. He is a graduate of Tufts University, Columbia Law School, and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.

Cosponsored with the The Future of Diplomacy Project, Harvard Kennedy School. 


South Asia Week 2015: Ambassador Jalil Jilani on US-Pakistan relations

START
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 02:30pm

END
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 04:00pm

VENUE
Allison Dining Room, Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Taubman Building
79 John F. Kennedy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

In this first public event of the Future of Diplomacy Project’s annual South Asia Week Ambassador Jalil Abbas Jilani discusses his country’s relationship with the United States and regional powers in a talk moderated by South Asia Institute Director, Professor Tarun Khanna, Harvard Business School.

Ambassador Jilani assumed his responsibilities as Ambassador of Pakistan on January 2, 2014. Prior to his appointment as Ambassador of Pakistan to the United States, Ambassador Jilani served as Foreign Secretary of Pakistan from March 2012 to December 2013. He is a career diplomat and has also served as Ambassador of Pakistan to Belgium, Luxembourg and the European Union (2009-2012) and as Pakistan’s High Commissioner to Canberra, Australia (2007-2009).

Ambassador Jilani holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Law and M.Sc. in Defence and Strategic Studies. In his professional life, he has specialized in South Asian affairs and remained Director India (1992-1995), Deputy High Commissioner/Acting High Commissioner to New Delhi (1999-2003) and Director General South Asia and SAARC (2003-2007). In 2005 he also served as the Government’s Spokesman on Foreign Affairs. From 1989 to 1992, Ambassador Jilani served as Deputy Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Secretariat. His other overseas assignments included; Jeddah (1983-1985), London (1985-1988) and Washington (1995-1999).

Cosponsored with The Future of Diplomacy Project, Harvard Kennedy School.


Summer in South Asia: Pre-Departure Orientation

START
Thu, Apr 30, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 30, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

This is an orientation for students who are traveling to South Asia in summer 2015, and will include travel tips and logistics, health and safety information, cultural introduction, and will provide an opportunity to meet other students who will be in the region. Food will be served!

All Harvard Students traveling to South Asia in the summer are welcome. Please RSVP to Nora Maginn, maginn@fas.harvard.edu if you’d like to join.