Select Page

Category : Announcements


In Pakistan, Life and Society Become Art

In Pakistan, Life and Society Become Art

“I was born in a very literary family full of artists, poets, and writers. The art was in the blood, and then my uncle, who is also a visual artist internationally recognized, so he basically channeled my interest into visual arts. Since then I have been involved in visual arts,” says Mahbub Jokhio, one of the Mittal Institute’s newest Visiting Artist Fellows for Spring 2019.

Art Exhibition Unveils Partition’s Lasting Legacy

Art Exhibition Unveils Partition’s Lasting Legacy

“In 1947, British India was divided into Pakistan and India, resulting in the largest forced migration in the history of migration. Certain records say there were about three million who migrated and were displaced, but studies done at Harvard show that the numbers were much higher — about 10–13 million people. The question becomes: Who lives to tell the story?” asks Meena Sonea Hewett, Executive Director of the Mittal Institute. “Art as a medium is a great way to tell these stories, because it allows for multiple perspectives to be shared about the Partition and the feelings associated with it.”

Robots in Classrooms? Next Stop, India

Robots in Classrooms? Next Stop, India

We recently sat down with Dmitry Popov and Ankur Goel, two members of the Soft Robotics Toolkit team at Harvard. This project — currently in the research, development, and testing phase — will become a comprehensive resource that teaches students how to design, fabricate, model, and test their own soft robotic devices.

The Partition Divided Cultures and Legacies — Can Artwork Unite?

The Partition Divided Cultures and Legacies — Can Artwork Unite?

Krupa Makhija is of the first generation of her family to be born in post-Partition India, her parents and grandparents having migrated from the Sindh Province of Pakistan during the Partition. She grew up hearing stories of the pre-Partition era, but only after high school and her art education did she become more curious about her culture, language, and identity. “Art education has created a kind of sensitivity in me, to question things about myself,” she says. Krupa takes the experiences she’s been told about from the Partition era and infuses their emotions and symbolism into her artwork to create a larger dialogue.  

Navigating the Gray Area Between Ethics and Genetics

Navigating the Gray Area Between Ethics and Genetics

Does the issue of ethics apply to all areas of genetics research? The news is constantly filled with stories questioning the authority of scientists to make decisions about human gene-editing and the future of the human race — but there’s more to genetics research than changing someone’s eye color or other physical predispositions. Genetics research opens the door to profound advancements in food security and public health, the management of which will become crucial in the years to come. 

Become a Student Ambassador with the Mittal Institute

Become a Student Ambassador with the Mittal Institute

To build our relationships with Harvard’s different schools, faculty, and student body, we are looking to hire student ambassadors from each of Harvard’s schools. These student ambassadors will help us connect with Harvard students, spread the word about our events, and use their unique knowledge of their own school to brainstorm potential new or partnered events for the Mittal Institute to host.

Ashoka University Builds Up Liberal Arts in India

Ashoka University Builds Up Liberal Arts in India

Last week, Dr. Pratap Bhanu Mehta — Vice Chancellor of Ashoka University in India — visited the Mittal Institute for an informal lunch with faculty and doctoral students. At the lunch, Dr. Mehta discussed the creation of Ashoka University, its commitment to the liberal arts, and the plans for its future.

Embracing Art at the TRACE Symposium

Embracing Art at the TRACE Symposium

On December 7–8, 2018, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University, and the Harvard Art Museums organized “TRACE: Artisanal Intelligence, Material Agency, and Ritual Technology in South Asian Art” — a symposium that brought together scholars of South Asian art, history, and culture.