Select Page

Events

SAI Event Topic : Arts Initiative

Artist talk: Waking Whispers

START
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Komal Shahid Khan, Visiting Artist, South Asia Institute Arts Program

Chair: Susan S. BeanChair, Art & Archaeology Center, American Institute of Indian Studies; Board Member, Textile Society of America; Associate, Peabody Museum, Harvard University; Senior Curator for South Asian and Korean Art. Peabody Essex Museum

Starting with an introduction and practices which lead to her specialization in Miniature painting, Khan will discuss how her work evolved over time, from traditional to conceptual and experimental. She will be talking about her Projects/ Series of Paintings, including: ‘Riddle, I call Life’ (2014), ‘Revelation’ (2015), ‘Aura’ (2015), ‘Her’ (2016), and ‘Imagined Immortals’ (2016).

She will show each painting briefly, commenting on individuals, society and the understanding of consciousness and unconsciousness and how her recent work is based upon what she calls “poetics of masquerade’’ in which the painted narratives are timeless and familiar.

Khan is a Visual Artist, based in Islamabad, Pakistan. She graduated from the University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan in 2012 and then did her Master in Fine Arts from Fatima Jinnah Women University Rawalpindi, Pakistan with specialization in Miniature Painting. On completing the degree in 2014, she scored Distinction and was awarded Gold Medal for herb Thesis Show in 2014. Since graduating, she started her career with Group Shows in art galleries in Islamabad/Rawalpindi and then moved on to Lahore and Karachi as well. She is presently teaching at the National College of Arts Rawalpindi, Pakistan, as a Lecturer. October, 2016 marks her First Solo Exhibition entitled as “Imagined Immortals” in Karachi, Pakistan.

Lunch will be served.

The South Asia Institute Visiting Artist Program hosts emerging artists at Harvard to engage with faculty, students, and the Harvard community.


Artist talk: White Butterfly

START
Wed, Apr 13, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 13, 2016 at 05:30pm

Art Seminar

Milan Rai, Visiting Artist, South Asia Institute Art Program

Chair: Jinah Kim, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Rai’s White Butterfly project was a personal art installation that has grown with a global outreach for different community causes and concerns. It is a demonstration of how the role of art can take different turns when shared across social media, connecting people and communities to effect social change and awareness. From Scotland to Greece to New York to Africa over the past two years, many connections around the world have been established.

Those connections became an unexpected source of support and real change in rapid response to the earthquake disasters in Nepal this year, initiating funding projects for immediate relief to provide sanitation facilities, toilets rebuilding a school and relocating an entire village. In this talk, Rai will introduce The White Butterfly project to the faculty and students at Harvard in the form of a retrospective photographic exhibition, including an interactive presentation.

Rai’s work will be on display starting April 11 in the follow locations: SAI office on the 4th floor CGIS South, CGIS South lobby (1730 Cambridge Street), and CGIS Knafel Lobby (1737 Cambridge Street).

Learn more about Milan Rai.

 


Great Eternal Return: A Social Media Film

START
Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Paribartana MohantyVisiting Artist, South Asia Institute Arts Program

Chair: Namita DhariaLecturer in Anthropology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

The lecture-performance is part of Mohanty’s larger project ‘Act the Victim’ that engages with the images of crisis circulating on social media. It is based on a video excerpt of TV interview of Narendra Modi, then Chief Minister of Gujarat, that went viral on social media just before the 2014 General Elections in India. ‘Great Eternal Return’ will deal with the plethora of anonymous and mysterious images circulating on social media landscape, and traveling across geographical boundaries, contesting meanings and proposing misreadings. It will on one level study the shifting values of these obsessively parasitic images: their displacement, associations, propagandas, and investigate the processes of their creation and resurrection elsewhere. On the other hand, it will attempt to comprehend our encounters with these temporal images that continuously replace each other in an itinerant loop and become part of our collective memory, occupy our everyday conversations, public sphere, and our dreams.

Q+A: Visiting Artist Paribartana Mohanty

 


Muzaffarnagar Baaqi Hai

START
Thu, Mar 10, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 10, 2016 at 07:00pm

VENUE
Yenching Auditorium

ADDRESS
Yenching Auditorium
2 Divinity Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

Film Screening and Discussion

Nakul Singh Sawhney, Filmmaker 

Chair: Asad Ahmed, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

In September 2013, Muzaffarnagar and Shamli districts in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh witnessed a pogrom against local Muslim residents. More than 100 were killed and over 80,000 displaced. This film explores the social, political, and economic dynamics in a region that has historically seen relative harmony between Hindus and Muslims. What happened this time? The film cuts across multiple facets of violence that right-wing nationalism has wrought in north India: ‘honor’ politics, gender violence, caste and class polarization under the umbrella of Hindu-ness or Hindutva. The film also shows how non-Hindutva parties in the region play along with such polarizing rhetoric in the hopes of electoral windfalls in their favor.

In the midst of this violence, the film also narrates a growing resistance in Muzaffarnagar and Shamli, where the story has yet to be played out. ‘What will be the fate of Muzaffarnagar, eventually?’

Sawhney graduated from the Film and Television Institute of India in 2006. His films focus on labor, gender, and caste issues in north India.


Freedom and Fear in Myanmar

START
Fri, Feb 19, 2016 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Feb 19, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Modern Asia Seminar and Arts at SAI Seminar

Ian Holliday,Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning), The University of Hong Kong

‘Altered State: Painting Myanmar in a time of transition,’ an exhibit of paintings will be on display Thursday, February 4 – Monday, February 22, 2016 in the Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA

Sponsored by the Asia Center and the South Asia Institute 

View the paintings here.


The Cross-Dressing God

START
Tue, Feb 9, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 9, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Arts at SAI Seminar

Devdutt Pattanaik, Author, Mythologist, Artist (@devduttmyth)

Chair: Gokul Madhavan, Preceptor in Sanskrit, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Can you imagine a cross-dressing God? Hindus can, and have, for over a thousand years. Did this express a universal social reality or was this a highly refined metaphor for a few remains a matter of speculation and fierce debate. But no one can deny that in Hindu holy books and temple imagery when God descends on earth to be the ‘complete man’, it involves incorporating the feminine. Such queer ideas extend themselves to Buddhist and Jain stories too, making it not just a Hindu idea but generally an Indic idea. Through shifts in gender, the fluid nature of the world was shared by the sages to help people expand (brah) their mind (mana). Come experience the stories and ideas they shared through art through Devdutt Pattanaik’s brilliant and unique sketches!

An exhibit of the same name will be on view February 2 – March 23, 2016 at the CGIS Knafel Concourse, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Cosponsored with the Arts Connect International, Asia Center, Carr Center, India GSD, LAMBDA at Harvard Law, Harvard India Student Group, South Asia Institute, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

Watch an interview with Devdutt Pattanaik:


A memory, a monument, a material

START
Wed, Dec 2, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Dec 2, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Basir Mahmood, Visiting Artist, SAI Arts Program

Chair: Jennifer Leaning, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights; Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health

Basir Mahmood, recipient of South Asia Institute 2015 Emerging Artist Award, will be offering insights into his practice as he has developed over the last few years, and will attempt to meaningfully engage audiences to mutually construct new narratives around his works. Using video, film or photographs, Mahmood’s work weaves together various threads of thoughts, findings and insights into poetic sequences, building various forms of narratives. In order to engage with situations around him, he ponders upon embedded social and historical terrains of the ordinary, as well as his personal milieu.

In “My father” 2010, an upright sewing needle appears in sharp focus as the blurred image of an old man attempting to thread the needle fills the screen. The agonizing process evokes a sense of humility and empathy through a personal connection suggested by means of the work’s title, as the man fails each attempt at the task. His work titled “Missing Letters” revolves around a collection of ashes from Returned Letter Office (RLO) at Pakistan Post Office, Lahore. Prior to Pakistan’s independence, and during the British Raj era, the RLO was known as “Dead Letters Office”, wherein undelivered letters were kept for thirty days before eventually being burnt. In this work, Mahmood drew some of the ashes of burnt undelivered letters, and reduced these ashes to the point where they cannot be burned anymore.

Basir’s work is currently on display at the SAI office on the 4th floor of CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street.

Q+A with Basir Mahmood

www.basirmahmood.com

The Arts at SAI initiative connects South Asia’s curators, museum administrators, artists, and art educators with Harvard faculty and students to support activity and research that advance understanding and appreciation of the tapestry of South Asian art and the heritage that defines its voice in the world.


cityinflux

START
Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Arts Seminar

Ranjit Kandalgaonkar, Visiting Artist, SAI Arts Program

Chair: Chitra Venkataramani, South Asian Studies Fellow, South Asia Institute

Kandalgaonkar’s art practice focuses primarily on unseen or ignored processes of urbanization. In his work, he draws upon contemporary visual arts media, archival documentation and historical artifacts to document, represent and critique urban flows. cityinflux is the name of his practice and an ode to the city’s urban condition that he is continuously invested in unlocking.

About Ranjit Kandalgaonkar’s work:

Since 2009, Stories of Philanthropic Trusts is a research project documenting all the communities living in 19th century Bombay and recording their philanthropic activities. Prior to that, Kandalgaonkar had collaborated with two architects on a project named Gentricity. It is a composite project covering urban planning, public culture, and visual art. The project has developed some multi-disciplinary paintings of localities in Mumbai, which represent narratives of the sites examined (old tenements and mixed-housing scenarios). build/browse looked at markets across London and Mumbai and aims to install an ongoing alternate archive of oral histories of objects found in markets. The online platform allows the public to engage in this project in the form of an interactive building game made with the help of web-coders. 7 isles unclaimed is a speculative/science fiction work imagining the original 7 island archipelago of Mumbai as never having become the reclaimed land form it is today. The stories, drawings and fictive maps re-imagine points in history where the city narrative could have gone either way.

The Arts at SAI initiative connects South Asia’s curators, museum administrators, artists, and art educators with Harvard faculty and students to support activity and research that advance understanding and appreciation of the tapestry of South Asian art and the heritage that defines its voice in the world.


Beyond Harvard

START
Mon, Mar 9, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 9, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
Science Center Hall A

ADDRESS
Science Center Hall A
Harvard University
Cambridge MA 02138

Student Event

Rahul BoseActor, Director & Social Activist

Chair: Richard DelacyPreceptor in Hindi and Urdu, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University 

Welcome by Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Harvard College

Described as the ‘Indian art house icon’ by TIME magazine, Rahul Bose won Best Actor, Singapore Film Festival, and Best Debut Director (second prize), for ‘Everybody Says I’m Fine!’ at Palm Springs. His NGO, The Foundation, works in the areas of education and child sexual abuse. He is an Oxfam Global Ambassador and is a former India international rugby player.

Cosponsored with the Harvard India Student Group


Perspectives: A Conversation with Rohail Hyatt

START
Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Arts Initiative and Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Rohail Hyatt, Producer, Coke Studio; actor; film composer; rock music artist; and keyboardist

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Hyatt will discuss the laws of nature in contrast to the current state of global music standards. Like genetically altered food, our sense of what is considered ‘musical’ seems to have been altered too. In the eastern world, music is considered to be the ‘food for the soul’. Do we know what are we feeding our souls lately? Has organic music completely died, or will there be a resurgence in this field as in the case of the food industry?

Co-sponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program


Cancelled: The Ephemeral City: Looking at Temporary Landscape of Religion in South Asia and Latin America

START
Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 05:30pm

END
Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Due to weather and the University closing, this event has been cancelled and will be rescheduled.

SAI Arts Initiative Event

Exhibition Reception and Personal Tour at 5:30PM in the CGIS South Second Floor Lobby, followed by a panel discussion at 6:30PM CGIS S010.

What is the role of the Ephemeral City in the broader discussion about urbanism globally? Rahul Mehrotra, Chair of  the Department of Urban Planing and Design (GSD), will moderate a conversation across disciplines about ephemerality in the landscapes of South Asian and Latin American cities.

Rahul Mehrotra (GSD), in collaboration with Jose Mayoral (GSD) and Felipe Vera (Universidad Adolfo Ibañez, Chile) will guide the audience through the exhibition at 5:30 PM.

Panelists:

Felipe Hernandez, Lecturer in Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Shankar RamaswamiLecturer on South Asian Studies, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Marianne Potvin, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Tarun Khanna, Director of the South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School
Luis ValenzuelaLecturer in Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

This panel is part of the exhibition The Ephemeral City: Looking at Temporary Landscape of Religion in South Asia and Latin America.

The Research Project on the Ephemeral City, led by professor Rahul Mehrotra at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, has been engaged in documenting and systematically compiling different forms of temporary urbanism worldwide, particularly in South Asia and Latin America. This exhibition focuses primarily on religion, one of the seven taxonomies  identified for the ephemeral city. It present ten cases of temporary occupation of urban spaces for religious events and celebration that demonstrate powerful ways in which the public realm is temporarily appropriated to create sacred spaces. In religious ephemeral landscapes, human ingenuity breaches the boundaries between the local and the global, the historic and the contemporary, converting permanent cities and landscapes into sacred grounds.

Cosponsored with the  David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) at Harvard University

 Q+A with Rahul Mehrotra


The Politickle Pickle: A Conversation on Indo-US Relations

START
Wed, Mar 25, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 25, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
Elliot Lyman Room, Longfellow Hall

ADDRESS
Elliot Lyman Room
Longfellow Hall
Harvard Graduate School of Education
13 Appian Way
Cambridge, MA

SAI Special Event

Tanvi Madan, PhD Fellow, Foreign Policy Director, The India Project The Brookings Institution

Shivshankar Menon, Former Indian NSA and Foreign Secretary

Chair: Nicholas Burns, Sultan of Oman Professor of the Practice of International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School

Cosponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the WCFIA Fellows Program. Supported by the Hindustan Times and the South Asian Art Council – Boston.

Reception at Gutman Library to follow.

Opinion by Nicholas Burns ‘A US-India Comeback?’ in The Boston Globe