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SAI Event Type : Seminars


Transcultural Attractions: American Photographs of an Indian Dancer

START
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

AJAY SINHA, Professor of Art History, Mount Holyoke College

Chair: JINAH KIMGardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture and Faculty Director, Arts @ Mittal Institute

In the Spring of 1938, an Indian dancer, Ram Gopal, posed in a variety of fantastical costumes for the American photographer, Carl Van Vechten, in New York City. Studying over 100 large-size photographs resulting from the photoshoot, the lecture builds an illustrated story of their mutual fascination and exchange, triggered by the camera. The remarkable images, now part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, Yale University, show traces of the myriad, transcultural relations being performed during the photoshoot. They reveal an interplay of differing investments in the image when we ask:  What does the Indian dancer show the camera;  what does the American photographer see through his lens?  Their visual exploration helps us elaborate on an underrepresented history of exchanges between the cultural worlds of India and the U.S. in early-20th century.


Preparing Young Indian Scientists for Life Sciences in the 21st Century

START
Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 03:00pm

END
Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 05:00pm

The landscape of life sciences — biology, biomedicine, biotech, and all the rest — is rapidly changing. Today, the amount of data produced is massive, and it increases exponentially with time. New techniques are invented every week as existing techniques get cheaper, though there are new ethical and moral concerns about playing with life processes. Physical and mathematical sciences are increasingly integrated into the life sciences, and exciting new career options are developing as academic positions get more competitive.

Life science research is at the heart of nearly every economic sector. But how do budding life scientists navigate all of these issues, and what can they do to prepare for the future? In this panel discussion, a group of distinguished life scientists and policymakers will discuss some of these issues and offer their guidance.

This program is delivered in coordination with Harvard Global Research Support Centre India

Please RSVP: mittalinstitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu


Rohingya Persecution in Myanmar: Evidence and Accountability

START
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) surveyed leaders from 604 Rohingya hamlets in Myanmar’s Rakhine state encompassing more than 916,000 people. The findings, coupled with in-depth interviews and forensic medical examinations of Rohingya survivors, point to a widespread and systematic pattern of targeted violence – including rapes and killings of women, men, and children – that drove more than 720,000 Rohingya into neighboring Bangladesh. Dr. Parveen Parmar and Dr. Jen Leigh will present the findings of these studies.


Prevention Science in Child Protection: An Indian Case Study

START
Wed, Sep 19, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Sep 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

COST   Free

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

This seminar, with support from the Harvard University Asia Center, will explore the early findings of a research project that examines community-level strategies to prevent violence, abuse, and exploitation of children in India.


Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis

START
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 08:00pm

Join us for our ongoing India Seminar Series to discuss the growing challenge of Water Fluorosis, in a discussion titled, ‘Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative technology as a solution to the spreading health crisis’

There are about 66 million people in India suffering from toxic levels of fluoride in their drinking water, these are mostly poor people in rural communities in dry / arid area that must depend of groundwater as their drinking water source. Fluoride is a vicious toxic ion in the sense that it affects and attacks the poor far more aggressively that it affects those nutritionally better off. It also is very effective in ruining the lives of very young people who then suffer from serious bone deformation (skeletal fluorosis) and its harmful economic, social, and psychological effects.

The panelists for this discussion include,

 – Dr. Andrew Z. Haddad- ITRI-Rosenfeld Postdoctoral Fellow, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

 – Srikrishna Sridhar Murthy- Founder and CEO, Sattva Consulting

 – Dr. Sunderrajan Krishnan- Executive Director, INREM Foundation

To RSVP write to mittalinsitutedelhi@fas.harvard.edu and confirm your presence at the event.


Urbanization Seminar: Mrinalini Rajagopalan

START
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of History of Art & Architecture, University of Pittsburgh, is a historian of India’s built environment and is particularly interested in the impact of colonialism and nationalism on the architectural, urban, and preservation cultures of modern South Asia. Her first monograph Building Histories: The Archival and Affective Lives of Five Monuments in Modern Delhi (University of Chicago Press, 2016) traces the modern lives of five medieval monuments in India’s capital city, Delhi, and brings attention to their contested histories, unexpected uses, and ideological appropriations by state and non-state actors. This book received the Alice Davis Hitchcock Award from the Society of Architectural Historians in 2018.

She is currently developing two new research projects. The first traces the built works of Begum Samru—a wealthy dowager who rose from modest beginnings as a dancing girl to become the independent ruler of a prosperous territory in nineteenth-century North India. The second, and more ambitious project, investigates the various architectural products built, commissioned, and patronized by the Tata Corporation during India’s long twentieth-century transformation from a European colony to a socialist nation and most recently to an economically-liberal state eager to participate in global markets.


Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

START
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Join Vijayendra Rao in a seminar discussing his paper “Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Analysis of Indian Village Assemblies” (Co-authored with R. Parthasarathy and N. Palaniswamy).

Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, a Lead Economist in the Research Department of the World Bank, integrates his training in economics with theories and methods from anthropology, sociology and political science to study the social, cultural, and political context of extreme poverty in developing countries.

He leads the Social Observatory, an inter-disciplinary effort to improve the conversation between citizens and governments. It does this – first – by improving the quality of civic action by strengthening forums for deliberation and developing tools to facilitate collective action, and – second – by building the “adaptive capacity” of large-scale anti-poverty projects;  i.e. the ability of projects to make everyday decisions, and modify project design, on the basis of high-quality descriptive, evaluative and process-oriented information.

His research has spanned a wide variety of subjects including participatory development, deliberative democracy, the rise in dowries in India, the determinants and consequences of domestic violence, the economics of sex work, public celebrations, and culture and development policy.

 

The paper he will be discussing during this seminar can be accessed here


Visiting Artist Program Lecture

START
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute’s Visiting Artist Fellowship (VAF) is an eight-week research fellowship at Harvard that connects artists from South Asia to Harvard’s intellectual resources. The Fellowship provides a platform for conducting independent research that explores critical issues in South Asia through the lens of art and design. The program welcomes applications from mid-career artists in South Asia to come to Harvard University to participate in interdisciplinary discourse with students and faculty on global issues relevant to South Asia.

In this lecture, these fellows will discuss the work they have created over the past year, and comment on their experience during their time in Cambridge.


Constructing a Majority: A Micro-Level Study of Voting Patterns in Indian Elections

START
Fri, Sep 7, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 7, 2018 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S354
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

JOINT SEMINAR ON SOUTH ASIAN POLITICS SERIES

Francesca R. Jensenius, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Oslo, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs

Chair: Emmerich Davies, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

 

Francesca Jensenius specializes in comparative politics, comparative political economy, and research methods, with a regional focus on South Asia and Latin America. Her main research interest is how institutional design and electoral dynamics affect different types of inequality. In the book Social Justice through Inclusion: The Consequences of Electoral Quotas in India (OUP 2017), she explored long-term effects of electoral quotas for the Scheduled Castes in India. In current projects she focus on the relationship between political institutions, electoral dynamics, and local-level development patterns in India, as well as on a how legal regimes and legal change across the world differentially affect women and other marginalized communities.


India Seminar Series: ‘Unspoken Story’

START
Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 04:30pm

END
Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 06:30pm

As part of our ongoing India Seminar Series, we are partnering with Sangath and It’s Ok To Talk for an event titled ‘Unspoken Story’ with Vikram Patel, The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School, in a conversation about mental health. This event is supported by Welcome Trust and the American Centre, and is also in partnership with Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS), USA.

 

 

 


Roads, Region Formation, and the Question of Tribes in Northeast India

START
Wed, Jun 27, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Jun 27, 2018 at 07:30pm

VENUE
India International Centre

ADDRESS
India International Centre
#40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate
Delhi, India


VENUE
Kamala Devi Complex


VENUE
Seminar Hall 3

Ziipao posits that road building has always been an act of power, which has at different times been leveraged to smooth relationships, securing borders, (dis)connecting people, enabling trade, creating spaces of contestation, or diluting boundaries between varied ethnic groups. Read Raile’s recent blog on the People’s Road. 

Presented by Raile Rocky Ziipao
Arvind Raghunathan and Sribala Subramanian South Asia Fellow

Moderated by Nitin A. Gokhale
Journalist and Defence Analyst


It’s Complicated: Unpacking the Material Consequences of Political Reservation in Bihar

START
Tue, May 29, 2018 at 06:00pm

END
Tue, May 29, 2018 at 07:30pm

This seminar focuses on how political reservation in favour of Scheduled Castes (SC) in Bihar affects inequality in private wealth and access to public goods. It presents research and findings of public good access across all of Bihar’s 45,000 villages and analyses data on private wealth for more than two crore rural households across the state.