Select Page

 Venue Information


CGIS South, S010

CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Events at this Venue

23rd Annual Harvard India Poetry Meeting

START
Sun, May 19, 2019 at 02:00pm

END
Sun, May 19, 2019

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

The theme for this year’s India Poetry Reading is “Compassion.” This annual event celebrates India’s contribution to the field of literature and invites local poets to recite original compositions in the language of their choosing. 

This event is presented in partnership with the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University and South Asian Poets of New England.

Please contact Bijoy Misra (bmisra@fas.harvard.edu) or Chandu Shah (bostonwale@gmail.com) for more information.

22nd Annual Harvard India Poetry Reading

START
Sun, May 13, 2018 at 02:00pm

END
Sun, May 13, 2018 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

The theme for this year’s India Poetry Reading is “Humanity”. This annual event celebrates India’s contribution to the field of literature and invites local poets to recite original compositions in the language of their choosing. 

Are South Asians a Single Population? Insights from Culture, Genetics and Disease

START
Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

During this interdisciplinary discussion, the four panelists will discuss the ways that cultural practices and social structures intersect with biomedicine and genetics. Specifically, they will be examining the ways that endogamy and caste structures in South Asian contexts have produced implications for health practices and medical predispositions. Ultimately, the discussion will touch upon the ways that seemingly disparate academic fields can help inform and improve the practices and understandings of other disciplines. This seminar was inspired by the New York Times article “In South Asian Social Castes, a Living Lab for Genetic Disease” by Steph Yin, published on July 17, 2017.

David Reich, Professor, Harvard Medical School
Priya Moorjani, Assistant Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development, University of California, Berkeley
Richard Meadow, Director, Zooarchaeology Laboratory, Peabody Museum of Harvard University
Michael Witzel, Wales Professor of Sanskrit, Harvard University

Chair: Venkatesh Murthy, Professor and Chair of Molecular and Cellular Biology

Co-sponsored with the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University; Possible through the generosity of the Asia Center

Check out the NY Times article that inspired today’s panel discussion on South Asia population genetic. 

Monday, April 23, 2018
4:00PM – 5:30PM
Reception to follow

21st Annual Harvard India Poetry Reading

START
Sun, May 14, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Sun, May 14, 2017 at 05:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Cosponsored Event

The South Asia Institute and Department of South Asian Studies presents the 21st annual Harvard India poetry reading. It is also the ninth anniversary meeting of South Asian Poets of New England (SAPNE). The theme for this event is Truth. We encourage new poets and new expressions. All languages are welcome, with some annotations in English. Entries will be accepted until May 7 and we can accommodate up to 25 readers.


For questions, please contact:
Bijoy Misra, bmisra@fas.harvard.edu
Chandu Shah, Bostonwale@gmail.com

Mumbai: Research + Projections Social Sciences and Spatial Thinking

START
Sat, Mar 4, 2017

END
Sat, Mar 4, 2017

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA


VENUE
Harvard University

Special Event

Featuring new and largely unpublished work, this one-day conference sets up a dialogue between designers and social scientists. By connecting fine-grained micro studies with broader imaginations for the metropolitan region, we intend to open up new scalar possibilities for Mumbai.

Cosponsored with Harvard Mellon Urban Initiative.

Enter the conference website and register.

Stories of Democracy in India

START
Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Film Screenings

Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Abhijit Banerjee, Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

Screening of Mandir, masjid, mandal and Marx: Democracy in India (45 minutes)

The film, by Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University, tells the story of the interaction of the people and their elected representatives in the plains carved out by India’s great river – the Ganga – flowing through three strategic states – Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal. Filmed in the course of a 1000-mile journey from Delhi to Calcutta during the turbulent general elections of 1991, it provides a rare glimpse into the role of religion, caste and communism in India’s democratic politics.

Screening of The strange case of the water that went up the great-grandfather’s arse and other stories of democracy by Abhijit Banerjee

Democracy is humanity’s bravest experiment. The idea that everyone–women and men, poor and rich, illiterate and educated–should be in charge of shaping the state and society they live in, is at once totally obvious and deeply radical. And yet, the lived experience of democracy is almost always disappointing. Corruption is often the rule and change is slow and difficult.

This film is about living this tension, through the eyes and voices of every day participants in the world’s largest democracy, India. Using unique footage that we shot in dozens of locations all over the country over eight years, with interviews with everyone from theorists to thugs (who are sometimes the same people), we document how profoundly the so-called bit-players in the democratic narrative—the often semi-literate voters, the local activists and the small-time leaders–have absorbed the democratic ethos. For all their cynicism and fear, it is for the poor, the marginalized and the powerless that the idea of democracy matters the most, what gives them the greatest hope for the future.

Combining animation, folk music and street plays with casual conversations at street corners, expert analyses and stump speeches, this is a documentary about a nation, a people and one extraordinary idea.

 

DeCoding Asian Urbanism

START
Fri, Oct 28, 2016

END
Sat, Oct 29, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Special Event

The symposium on DeCoding Asian Urbanism explores the current discourse and creation of innovative architecture and urban interventions that are effectively transforming the spatial and operational landscape of the complex Asian city. The focus is to highlight efforts that strategically embrace the rapid growth and the cultural and physical complexity of the built environment in Asia. The symposium builds on an exhibition at the A+D Architecture +Design Museum>Los Angeles, curated by Kenneth Frampton, Ken Yeang and Farooq Ameen. The comprehensive effort including the exhibition, this symposium and accompanying publication stimulates a dialogue between designers, policy makers and public officials who are shaping the Asian city today.

Cosponsored with the Bengal Foundation and the A+D Museum, Los Angeles

Enter the conference website and register.

What the Fields Remember

START
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Film Screening

Subsari Krishnan, Filmmaker

Shankar RamaswamiLecturer on South Asian Studies; Director of Undergraduate Studies, Harvard University

On 18th February 1983, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, more than 2000 Muslims were killed in the town of Nellie and its surrounding villages in Assam, India. People’s homes were burnt down and their fields destroyed. Most of those who died were old people, women and children. Till date the Nellie massacre, remains on the margins of India’s public history, and is virtually wiped out from the nation’s collective memory.

The documentary film What the Fields Remember revisits the massacre three decades later. From the survivors, Sirajuddin Ahmed and Abdul Khayer’s, retelling of the event, and their struggles of coping with loss and memories that refuse to fade away, the film attempts to explore ideas of violence, memory and justice. It also tries to understand how physical spaces that have witnessed the violence continue to mark people’s relationship to history and memory. What the Fields Remember also attempts to raise larger questions around collective memory – of what we choose to remember and why we choose to forget.

20th Annual Harvard India Poetry Reading

START
Sun, May 15, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Sun, May 15, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
CGIS South, S010
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Poems of all languages are invited for recitation. All are welcome.

Cosponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies and the South Asian Poets of New England

For questions, please contact:
Bijoy Misra, bmisra@fas.harvard.edu
Chandu Shah, Bostonwale@gmail.com